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RPM Festival

Revolutions per Minute festival, an artist run festival, is dedicated to short-form poetic, personal, cinematic work in experiments, essay film, animation, documentary, video and audiovisual performance.

RPM24: We are looking for any work that experiments with the formal possibilities or hybrid form of film, audiovisual, animation and video.

Shorts under 10mins
Medium Length under 20mins
Essay and Documentary under 30mins
Thematic Category: Water under 15mins


Submit your work (produced after Jan. 1st, 2023)
through FilmFreeway. Selections by Sept. 1, 2024.

Revolutions Per Minute Festival 2023 - 2024 was co-hosted by
Art and Art History Department and Cinema Studies at UMass-Boston, Goethe-institut Boston , Brattle Theatre in Cambridge & Harvard FAS CAMLab.
RPM Series at Boston City hall presented with the support of a grant from Mayor's Office of Arts & Culture. For more info: contact@revolutionsperminutefest.org




RPM24
PROGRAMS


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March 15th, 7PM

Made by Hand: FILM FARM


Harvard CAMlab
Lower Auditorium
485 Broadway
Cambridge MA 02138



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March 15th, 9PM
Philip Hoffman

Collaborations & Meditations
45-year practice

Harvard CAMlab
Lower Auditorium
485 Broadway
Cambridge MA 02138



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March 16th, 7PM
Jim Finn

The Apocalyptic is the Mother of All Christian Theology
Harvard CAMlab
Lower Auditorium
485 Broadway Cambridge MA 02138



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March 16th, 9PM Breathscapes
Curated by
Kalpana Subramanian

Harvard CAMlab
Lower Auditorium
485 Broadway Cambridge MA 02138



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April 17th, 6PM
Vitreous Chamber:
Malic Amalya &
Nathan Hill


  • Brattle Theatre
    40 Brattle Street
    Cambridge MA
    617-876-6837


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    Boston City Hall Plaza
    CIVIC PAVILION


    April 30th

    1 CITY HALL SQUARE, BOSTON, MA 02201

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    February 13th
    Passages


  • Alternative Cinema
    Colgate University

    13 Oak Street
    Hamilton, NY



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    April 16th
    RPM @ Colgate University
    (Program 02: 16mm)


  • Alternative Cinema
    Colgate University

    13 Oak Street
    Hamilton, NY


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    Sunday
    Feb. 11th, 2PM

    Hymn to Her:
    Stan Brakhage & Barbara Hammer
    • Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge MA
      617-876-6837



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    Sunday
    Jan. 28th, 2PM

    RPM Solo Artist:

    Kelly Sears
    We were given these instructions
    • Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge MA
      617-876-6837



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    Tuesday
    Feb.27
    4PM
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    • Tuesday, Feb. 27th, 4PM
      The Campus Center (03-3540)
      University of Massachusetts Boston
      100 Morrissey Boulevard
      Boston, MA 02125

    Artist Lecture Series
    Su Friedrich

    How to Drag Your Private Life, Kicking and Screaming, Into the Public: Looking Back at Forty-Six Years of Filmmaking


    Su Friedrich will present a “clip talk” that surveys many of her twenty-five films, including Gently Down the Stream (1981), Sink or Swim (1990), Gut Renovation (2012), and I Cannot Tell You How I Feel (2016). For each work, she will give a brief summary of the motivations, ideas, and formal concerns involved in making the film and then show a three-to-five-minute excerpt.
    "Artist Lecture Series" is free and open to the public, and co-hosted by Art and Art History Department and Cinema Studies at UMass-Boston

    Su Friedrich photo by Alexander Tuma, 2013



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    Gently Down the Stream

    Su Friedrich | 1981 | 14 minutes | B&W | SILENT

    About Su Friedrich:

    Su Friedrich has directed twenty-five films and videos since 1978, which have been featured in twenty-three retrospectives at major museums and film festivals including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Rotterdam Film Festival, the Buenos Aires Festival of Independent Cinema and the National Film Theater in London and they have been widely screened and extensively written. Her work is the subject of two recent books: Su Friedrich: Interviews, edited by Sonia Misra and Rox Samer, Univ. of Mississippi Press (2022) and Su Friedrich by Barbara Mennel, Univ of Illinois Press (2023.) The films have won numerous awards, including Grand Prix at the Melbourne Film Festival, Outstanding Documentary Award at Outfest and Best Narrative Film Award at the Athens International Film Festival. Fifteen of her films are available on DVD and VOD streaming from Outcast Films and her two most recent films are at Icarus Films.

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    Gently Down the Stream

    Su Friedrich | 1981 | 14 minutes |
    B&W | SILENT 16mm film, 18 fps

    Constructed from fourteen dreams taken from my journals. The text is scratched directly onto the film, so that you hear your own voice as you read. The "framed" images accompanying the words are of women, water, animals and saints, which were chosen for their indirect but potent correspondence to the text.

    "... her films (particularly the celebrated GENTLY DOWN THE STREAM) signalled an important change that was occurring within the evolution of experimental cinema ... [I]t demonstrates her considerable technical talents and formal creativity." - Bruce Jenkins, Millennium Film Journal "The film portrays a dreamscape where society's conflicts step on stage in muted, mysterious forms." - Kathleen Hulser, In These Times

    "What's so striking is her use of film to create a language which corresponds materially to the semi-conscious state between dreaming and waking." - Jo Comino, City Limits, London Exhibition: Osnabr?ck Media Arts Festival, 1983; Women's Film Festival, NY, 1983; Women's Film Festival, Montreal, 1985; Haifa Int'l Film Festival, Israel, 1985; Experimental Film Festival, Argentina, 1983.

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    Thursday
    March 7th
    7PM
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    • Thursday, March 7th, 7PM
      Boston City Hall Plaza

      Civic Pavilion
      5 Congress St.
      Boston
      MA 02203

    Affinity + Rhythm


    RPM Festival, in collaboration with Non-Event, Presents "Affinity + Rhythm": A Night of Expanded Cinema, Audiovisual Performance, and Noise Duo Live

    Boston, MA – RPM Festival, in partnership with Non-Event, is thrilled to announce the co-presentation of ""Affinity + Rhythm," an evening of immersive experiences featuring expanded cinema, audiovisual performances, and live noise duos. Proudly supported by the Boston Mayor's Office of Art and Culture, this event is scheduled to captivate audiences on March 7th from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM at the Boston City Hall Civic Pavilion.

    "Affinity + Rhythm" blends three distinct sonic and visual explosions. Witness the convergence of expanded cinema with noise performances, as electronic beats interweave seamlessly with abstract visual effects, creating a multisensory feast for attendees. This event marks the second installment of the RPM at Boston City Hall Civic Pavilion series, an initiative dedicated to promoting contemporary experimental cinema and fostering a dynamic creative dialogue between visual and auditory art forms.
    The collaboration has garnered crucial support from the Boston Mayor's Office of Art and Culture, underlining the city's commitment to nurturing and showcasing the arts.


    "Affinity + Rhythm" is free and open to the public.

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    The lineup for "Affinity + Rhythm" includes:

    1. Sheer Anxiety (Chris Strunk and Andrea Pensado):
    Chris Strunk - Boston-based percussionist and drummer, focusing on cymbal overtones, friction, and non-traditional objects used as percussion instruments in his solo work.
    Andrea Pensado - Experimental musician, composer, and concert organizer based in Salem, Massachusetts. She creates a highly personal sonic language using harsh, dense layers of sounds, often interwoven with her voice.

    2. Tomonari Nishikawa:
    Utilizing a 16mm film projector since 2013, Nishikawa scratches the film emulsion to produce visual and sound effects. He will present his ongoing 16mm film projection performance project, "Six Seventy-Two Variations," as part of the Expanded Cinema Performance.

    3. Feng Jiangzhou:
    Concluding the evening is Feng Jiangzhou, a solo electronic artist with a diverse background in new media art, sound art, installation art, film and television scores, and stage design. Formerly the lead singer of the Fly Band, Feng Jiangzhou is recognized as an early electronic musician in China.

    "Affinity + Rhythm" is a free and open-to-the-public event, inviting all art enthusiasts and curious minds to experience the cutting-edge convergence of audiovisual creativity. Join us on March 7th at the Boston City Hall Civic Pavilion for an experimental exploration.

    Sheer Anxiety (Noise Duo)
    Chris Strunk + Andrea Pensado

    Six Seventy-Two Variations
    Tomonari Nishikawa

    Feng Jiangzhou

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    Sheer Anxiety


    Chris Strunk + Andrea Pensado

    CHRIS STRUNK is a Boston based percussionist and drummer. His solo work focuses on cymbal overtones, friction, and the vibration and rattle of non traditional objects used as percussion instruments. He has been an active show promoter and musician in the Boston area for the past twenty years. He has been active in many groups such as Los Condenados, Avoidance, Taps, Phantom Rides, Sheer Anxiety, Conversions, Baja Blatz, Sleeper Cell, and many more. His released a solo CD called No Chart Could Map My Constellations on the Philadelphia based label Killing Time Between the Ice Ages in 2017, and recently authored a zine about the history of DIY punk spaces in Boston that was published by Free the Future Press and was nominated for a Broken Pencil Zine Award.

    ANDREA PENSADO is an experimental musician, composer, and concert organizer, based in Salem, Massachusetts. While she initially composed mainly for acoustic instruments, she was gradually more attracted to working in a different, far more abrasive sound world. In her current work, she creates a highly personal sonic language using harsh, dense layers of sounds, often interwoven with her voice. Her live, interactive musical systems and use of invented language combine into inherently unstable performances full of ecstatic energy. She also curates the Sonorium concert series in Salem.

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    Six Seventy-Two Variations
    Tomonari Nishikawa


    Nishikawa ’s films explore the idea of documenting situations/phenomena through a chosen medium and technique, often focusing on process itself. His films have been screened at numerous film festivals and art venues, including Berlinale, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, London Film Festival, Media City Film Festival, New York Film Festival, Singapore International Film Festival, and Toronto International Film Festival. In 2010, he presented a series of 8mm and 16mm films at MoMA P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, and his film installation, Building 945, received the 2008 Grant Award from the Museum of Contemporary Cinema in Spain. Nishikawa started using a 16mm film projector for his performance projects in 2013, scratching the film emulsion to produce the visual and sound. His on-going 16mm film projection performance project, “Six Seventy-Two Variations,” have been performed at Cosmic Rays Film Festival, Exploratorium in San Francisco, FRACTO in Berlin, New York Film Festival, Shapeshifters Cinema in Oakland, among others. He also uses slide projectors in his performance or collaborative work with sound artists, and one of such works, “Chiratsuki,” was performed with SONTAG SHOGUN at Mono no Aware VIII in New York.

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    Feng Jiangzhou



    Renowned as the frontman for the Fly Band and hailed as a trailblazer in the realm of electronic music in China, Feng Jiangzhou has left an indelible mark on the Chinese scene. In 1998, he embarked on a groundbreaking collaboration with the Taiwanese electronic group 3rdNova, resulting in the release of his inaugural electronic music album, "Love in the Time of Flies." This marked a significant milestone in Feng Jiangzhou's career, showcasing his versatility and innovation.

    Beyond his achievements in music, Feng Jiangzhou's artistic pursuits extend across a diverse spectrum. His influence resonates in new media art, sound art, installation art, film and television scores, and stage design, reflecting a multifaceted creative spirit.

    In 2006, Feng Jiangzhou co-founded the "Deaf Mute Blind School Club" label alongside Wu Ershan, contributing to the release of three albums before taking a hiatus from his musical endeavors. The year 2019 witnessed his triumphant return as he graced the stage at the Tomorrow Music Festival in Shenzhen, reigniting his passion for performance. Fast forward to 2023, Feng Jiangzhou embarked on an extensive series of tours with the Fly Band, making waves at prestigious events such as the West Lake Music Festival, Strawberry Music Festival, and the Hong Kong Clockenflap Music Festival. With an enduring commitment to pushing boundaries and exploring new sonic landscapes, Feng Jiangzhou continues to captivate audiences worldwide.



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    Thursday
    March.14
    9PM
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    • Thursday, March. 14th, 9PM
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle St.

      Cambridge MA



    another horizon

    Stephanie Barber



    RPM Film Festival and the Brattle Theatre are proud to announce the screening of solo artist Stephanie Barber. Famed for her avant-garde vision and unparalleled mastery of visual poetry, Barber stands out as an extraordinary talent, captivating audiences with her innovative storytelling and immersive cinematic experiences.

    With an exceptional ability to push the boundaries of traditional filmmaking and video art, Stephanie Barber has become a trailblazer in the realm of experimental cinema. Her keen eye for detail and flair for the unconventional invite viewers on a transformative journey of introspection and discovery, redefining the art of storytelling through the lens of avant-garde creativity. From intricate montages to evocative soundscapes, Barber's films serve as a testament to the boundless power of experimental storytelling, challenging perceptions and igniting the imagination of audiences.

    Sponsored by RPM Festival, Brattle Theatre, Art and Art History Department & Cinema Studies Program at UMB, SCMS (Society for Cinema and Media Studies & Experimental Film and Media Special Interest Group)






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    another horizon
    2020 | 00:08:54 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | 16mm film to HD

    Oh My Homeland
    2020 | 00:03:50 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | 16mm film to HD

    3 peonies
    2017 | 3m 13 sec | color | sound | 16mm to HD

    The Hunch that Caused the Winning Streak and Fought the Doldrums Mightily
    2010 | 00:02:05 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | DV video

    dwarfs the sea
    2008 | 00:06:15 | B&W | Stereo | 4:3 | DV video

    the visit and the play
    2008 | 00:08:00 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | DV video

    BUST CHANCE
    2010 | 00:07:00 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | miniDV

    flower, the boy, the librarian
    1997 | 00:05:00 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | 16mm to video

    total power dead dead dead
    2005 | 00:03:00 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | 16mm to video

    shipfilm
    1998 | 00:04:00 | B&W | SILENT | 16mm to Video

    dogs
    2000 | 00:05:00 | color | sound | 16mm to Video

    letters, notes
    1997 | 00:06:00 | color | Sound | 16mm to Video

    the information
    2022 | 00:01:12 | Color | Sound | 4:3 | video

    Total: 70mins

    Post-screening discussion:
    Stephanie Barber & Kalpana Subramanian

    Stephanie Barber is an American writer and artist. She has created a poetic, conceptual and philosophical body of work in a variety of media. Many of her videos are concerned with the content, musicality and experiential qualities of language. They ferry viewers through philosophical inquiry with the unexpected oars of play, emotionalism, story, and humor. Many balance several seemingly unrelated concepts––subtly suggesting or brazenly demanding a focused and imaginative reception. Many create gently complex, emotional studies. Others are funny; a sorrowful sort of funny. There are videos of obsessive observing and ambient sounds; small artificial fireworks, animals, and silence. They are tightly wound, dense, and light simultaneously. Barber's films and videos have has been screened nationally and internationally in solo and group shows at MOMA, NY, The Tate Modern, London; The Whitney Museum of American Art, NY; The Paris Cinematheque; The Walker Art Center, MN; MOCA Los Angeles, The Wexner Center for Art, OH, among other galleries, museums and festivals. Her essays, stories and poems have been published in books, magazines and online journals.

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    another horizon
    2020 | 00:08:54 | United States | English | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | 16mm film

    The horizon, where the sky and the earth meet, is always elsewhere, a promised place where these two elements come together. A metaphor, an orienting, a promise of transition, change, transcendence. A place where the corporeal and spiritual meet, or are cleaved apart.

    Another Horizon is an experimental documentary, a meeting of fact and fiction. Jayne Love reads a text I wrote for her––short sentences on the concept of the horizon and the briefest suggestion of narrative collide with pieces of Richard (Oswan) Williams' beautiful, rum-fueled living room sermons to me. I created the long scrolling collage out of found images. After filming the collage I physically scratched the horizon line out of each frame, further enunciated this space between.

    I lived, for a few months, in Richard, and his wife Mary’s, apartment, the site of their Voodoo Spiritual Temple in New Orleans. Of course, as priests and priestesses Richard and Mary spoke often of death, transcendence, ethics and health. Our days were slow and filled with philosophical rumination, Richard, a brilliant old man schooling a young wandering wonderer. I recorded most everything on cassette tapes back then and some of those have made it here to the present. To this horizon we’re at now.

    --SB

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    Oh My Homeland
    2020 | 00:03:50 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | 16mm film to HD

    In 1985 the great soprano Leontyne Price sung the title role in Verdi’s Aida as her farewell opera. After the ‘O patria mia’ aria, the audience breaks into a four-minute applause. 'Oh My Homeland' is the third in a series of minimal single shot 16mm films I’m currently building. It’s a film about representation, art, and material exchange. It’s a film about endings. It’s a film about identity, love, power, patriotism and the transcendent potential of art through the viewing of a face receiving adoration. A minimal gesture akin to the practice every portrait painter or mother recognizes as ineffably powerful. It is essentially a readymade and like my book 'Night Moves' and my video "Tatum's Ghost" it continues to explore Youtube as a cultural and social archive.

    Oh My Homeland, while being simply a shot of Ms. Price’s face as she receives the applause and before returning to the role, expands with the unaltered meditation on the shot. The transformational power of art for society and the maker alike; the implication of Ms. Price’s race and the context to which she dedicated her life; the staggering political implications of the Verdi aria (a mournful and complicated love letter to Aida’s homeland) in a time in which love of (my) country is hard to muster.

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    3 peonies
    2017 | 3m 13 sec | color | sound | 16mm to HD

    A brief, poetic 16mm film on a simple sculptural action. An experimental film in which the simplicity of the image is offset by the sonic implications.

    What becomes apparent is the humor possible in material interactions and the tender and sometimes melodramatic symbolism of cut flowers. What begins as a reverence for natural beauty ends up pointing towards the abstract expressionism and color field work of high modernism which, in many cases eschewed the banality of such ‘natural’ beauty. The collaged soundtrack suggests weightier concerns, gently insistent behind the flatness of the utilitarian sounds of ripping tape.

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    The Hunch that Caused the Winning Streak and Fought the Doldrums Mightily
    2010 | 00:02:05 | United States | English | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | DV video

    The interior was delusional like any visual psyche. The couches and plants, rugs and paintings were all in cahoots and up in arms over the cahootery. The explorers were under-qualified and cowardly.

    These interiors — the photos hung on the walls, the furniture and rugs, houseplants and televisions — are collaged from photos of various domestic items from Croatian, Serbian and Bosnian homes brought together to suggest one continuous home. I'm interested in the tension between the visible and the invisible cultural markers represented here. The British parade matted into the televisions, the Japanese musician and Ethiopian music exaggerate this collision.

    — SB

    Originally created for Milwaukee International with The Suburban's exquisite corpse video for the "No Soul For Sale" show at the Tate Modern.

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    dwarfs the sea
    2008 | 00:06:15 | B&W | Stereo | 4:3 | DV video

    Small biographies and musing generalizations––men’s relations to each other and their lives. There is hope and loneliness, companionship and isolation and the simplest of filmic elements to contrast the complexity of human emotions. The delicacy of the formalist writing moves the listener from intimacy to universalism and back again, swaying gently to and fro like the rocking of a ship.

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    the visit and the play
    2008 | 00:08:00 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | DV video

    A playful and dark conversational study—wrapping prose poetry into the recognizable conversational form and allowing both connections and missed meanings. First the ladies visit, the image—a roving camera lovingly viewing a still image—calls up both the progress and stagnancy of their talk, then they go to watch a play—on a television, in a snow garden. In many ways the play references the cadence of the ladies' conversation—the tedious animosity and lack of attentive or appropriate response. I am thinking about the art of conversation, the various directions this art takes and the ways one's receptivity to dialog changes when the subjects creating this dialog are taken out of the equation, or suggested scantily.
    -- SB

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    BUST CHANCE
    2010 | 00:07:00 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | miniDV

    the audience's engagement with the smallest subtleties and less than (usually considered) spectacular elements of theater is impressive and speaks volumes on the patience and acuity of modern viewers. their finely tuned sense of humor and rapt and continuous focus warms the cynics' icy exterior. likewise, the feedback loop of mutual artistic understanding and respect from the performing elements and receptive viewers, and back again, fortifies those who wish to love art and believe it must have revolutionary value. all are satisfied and feel good in the showing of satisfaction.

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    flower, the boy, the librarian
    1997 | 00:05:00 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | 16mm to video

    It's a love story, with the usual dashing figures and old habits of spelling, repetition and listing.
    V-A-S-T;
    V-A-S-T;
    V-A-S-T;
    N-E-E-D;
    "In a certain way, the title tells you everything, the simplicity of S. Barber's FLOWER, THE BOY, THE LIBRARIAN is somewhat misleading in terms of its content or how the hidden poetry of those contents are discovered. The work hints at a vast space which takes the form of these three characters (the flower, the boy and the librarian) but, at the same time seems not to be fixed on these things, but to represent something else, something mysteriously luminous." - Gregg Biermann

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    total power dead dead dead
    2005 | 00:03:00 | Color | Stereo | 4:3 | 16mm to video

    a love letter to the charm of two dimensional images and a struggle for attention. confusion over the inequity of the mortality of images and that of humans. (slightest indictment). the spectacle awaits our adoration, gives a tender, false intimation of collusion.

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    shipfilm
    1998 | 00:04:00 | B&W | SILENT | 16mm to Video

    this is probably the most heartbreaking film i have made, the pacing is romantic and simple, haiku-esque pauses and inclusions, with the words contrasting this poetry with their factual, disinterested narration. and that narration is a simple statement of failure, one which lies, not in any action, but in the pre-thought to that action, the hope or faith one holds in oneself, one's knowledge or abilities.

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    dogs
    2000 | 00:05:00 | color | sound | 16mm to Video

    a mini revolution. wrong choices. the divorce of ethereal beauty and mystery so common in experimental films, in my films. what begins as devastatingly awkward or 'tender' unfolds itself to show a deceptive, strangely rigid literary formalism commented upon by the content. the two dance around (form and content) moving towards and away from each other in the tricky, clear dialogue. hyper-reflexivity, art and love--and the role faith plays in each of these. i myself feel safest around purposefulness, can read more clearly an artists work when i trust that choices have been weighed, bear meaning. this film requires a great deal of faith, because it is strange and labile. its device-ness is so apparent as to have left it naked, and then so naked as to be, perhaps, closed again (so that it is possible i have lied about the divorce).
    - SB

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    letters, notes
    1997 | 00:06:00 | color | Sound | 16mm to Video

    this film brings found photographs and letters to create new mini narratives. death and disease are set blithely beside, and given equal importance as, the sighting of a skunk or love sick scribblings.

    "letters, notes was neither too long nor too knowing and produced the most profound occasion of un remembrance on my part. Too busy trying to figure out what it all meant, I neglected to note down the words passing across the screen or what was beneath them, but I can tell you I was strangely moved, and I desire to see it once more just so I can again become so wrapped up that I forget to remember." --jeff lambert, senses of cinema

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    the information
    2022 | 00:01:12 | Color | Sound | 4:3 | video

    sometimes, among the rubble of the endless forgetting and re-membering of our personal and collective histories, an artifact emerges. a clue, a document. hard evidence. maybe we struggle to contextualize these fragments, maybe we marry them to other fragments and build new narratives in an attempt to squint back through the past and explain to ourselves how we got here. the information is a short exclamation mark of a video, fragments asserting themselves as whole auto-ethnographies.

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    Friday
    March.15
    7PM
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    • Friday, March. 15th, 7PM
      Harvard Fas CAMLab
      Lower Auditorium
      485 Broadway
      Cambridge MA 02138



    Made by Hand

    Film Farm: 30th Anniversary Screening



    For 30 years, between the greenery and the rivers near Mount Forest (Ontario, Canada), a unique retreat for filmmakers takes place at the Film Farm, conducted by Philip Hoffman and a dedicated staff of innovative film artists (Rob Butterworth, Christine Harrison, Deirdre Logue, Scott Miller Berry and Terra Jean Long). Founded in 1994 as the Independent Imaging Retreat, Film Farm is an artist-driven, intensive, week-long analogue filmmaking workshop and is a central part of Canada’s experimental film scene. The Film Farm has initiated and enhanced the work of local, national and international filmmakers and has expanded the traditions of experimental filmmaking in Canada and beyond. The workshop concentrates on hand-processing of 16mm film, most recently (since 2012) working with botanical developing processes. Works of the Film Farm are influenced by the methodology of Process Cinema, developed over many years through Hoffman’s own filmmaking and through his teaching at York University in his Process Cinema course (circa. 2007). In Process Cinema, artists replace the usual protocol of the script or screenplay, with a direct engagement with the world through the hand-cranked Bolex camera and hand-made analogue filmmaking processes. Having now produced almost 300 `graduates’ (of whom almost two-thirds are women) and over 100 completed works, the Film Farm has helped sustain a spirit of discovery and risk in contemporary experimental filmmaking. For many of the filmmakers in the program, the Film Farm has been a catalyst as they embarked on their practice of artist filmmaking.

    The first part of the program begins in the 1990’s when the Film Farm and its methods of hand processing celluloid with conventional photo chemicals was established with many films completed on 16mm. The second part of the program reflects recent concerns as the Film Farm turned to more ecologically friendly processing practices, using local flowers and plants to develop the films, and finished as digital films. As well the second part of the program highlights the Film Farm-Saugeen First Nation collaborations, which have been taking place since 2018 in Chippewa Hill near Southampton, Ontario. The Saugeen Takes on Film works are a collaboration between Film Farm and the Fabulous Festival of Fringe Film, with artists, storytellers, knowledge keepers, and youth from the community. The workshop was also a collaboration with Saugeen First Nation Employment and Training Centre, and funded by the Ontario Arts Council and through Archive/Counter Archive, York University.

    Sponsored by RPM Festival, Harvard FAS CAMLab, Art and Art History Department & Cinema Studies Program at UMB, SCMS ExFM SIG (Society for Cinema and Media Studies Experimental Film and Media Special Interest Group)






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    Across
    3 min 16mm Sd 1997 (Canada)
    By Cara Morton


    Minus
    3 min 16mm Sd 1999 (Malaysia/Canada)
    By Chris Chong


    We Are Going Home
    10 min 16mm Sd 1998 (USA/Canada)
    By Jennifer Reeves


    Hardwood Process
    13:30 min 1997 16mm Silent (USA/Canada)
    By David Gatten


    Unless You’re Living It
    8:22 min 16mm to HDV Sd., 2019 (USA/Canada)
    By Sarah Bliss


    Casa de la Noche (House of Nights)
    13:30 min 16mm to HDV Sd 2017 (Cuba/Canada)
    By Marcel Beltran


    Dandelion
    2:15 min 16mm to HDV Silent 2018 (Aust./Netherlands/U.K./Canada)
    By Karel Doing


    It Matters What
    9 min 16mm to HDV Sd 2019 (Chile/Canada)
    By Francisca Duran


    Ancestors’ Gift
    3 min 16mm to HDV Sd 2019 (Saugeen Nation/Canada)
    By Natalka Pucan


    Everything is Right Here
    5:47 min 16mm to HDV Sd 2021 (Saugeen Nation/Canada)
    By Adrian Kahgee


    Total: 70mins

    Post-screening discussion:
    Philip Hoffman & Kathryn Ramey

    Kathryn Ramey is a filmmaker and anthropologist whose work operates at the intersection of experimental film processes and ethnographic research. Her award winning and strongly personal films are characterized by manipulation of the celluloid including hand-processing, optical printing, and various direct animation techniques. Most recently she has been focused on creating an anti-colonial film practice with collaborators in Puerto Rico and researching environmentally friendly photochemical processes utilizing indigenous flora. She is deeply committed to sharing her knowledge of alternative analogue technologies through workshops and publications.

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    Across
    3 min 16mm Sd 1997 (Canada)
    By Cara Morton

    Across is shaped through unity; the film is about crossing a bridge. The central tension in this lovely film is built upon a desire to connect with an image from the filmmaker’s past. The metaphoric journey forward to see the past is conveyed through a hand-held camera travelling at a great speed across a dirt road, through fields, along fences and through woods. Different color stocks combine with high contrast black and white images of the bridge while on the soundtrack we hear a river. An intensity and anticipation is created in the movement and in the juxtaposition of the different elements. -Janine Marchessault Women, Nature and Chemistry: Hand-Processed Films from Film Farm.

    Cara Anne Morton (1968 - 2012) was passionate about sharing her experience as an artist and experimental filmmaker with local community members, and advocated a do-it-yourself approach to creating art, with particular interest in the creative process, over final products.

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    Minus
    3 min 16mm Sd 1999 (Malaysia/Canada)
    By Chris Chong

    Minus is a hand-processed, unedited stream of movements. After subtracting most of what took place before the camera, what is left is remnants of light and rhythm, traces of a body in motion. This was Chong's first 16mm film, and demonstrates the kinds of rich results that can be obtained from simple, highly restricted means and techniques. -Chris Gehman ` The Independent Imaging Retreat’, The Fabulous Festival of Fringe Film (Program Notes 2004).

    Chris Chong Chan Fui is a Malaysian artist and filmmaker, who has worked in both Malaysia and Canada. Originally from Borneo, Chong lived and worked in Canada for a number of years after attending the University of Calgary as an international student. He had returned to Malaysia by the time of his 2009 feature film debut Karaoke. The film premiered in the Directors' Fortnight stream at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival; and later won the Mavericks Award at the 2009 Calgary International Film Festival.
    He has since concentrated primarily on art, including work in photography, painting and video installation.

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    We Are Going Home
    10 min 16mm Sd 1998 (USA/Canada)
    By Jennifer Reeves

    We Are Going Home is a gorgeous surrealistic film that has all of the characteristics of the trance film and more. It is structured around a dream sequence that has no real beginning or end. The first image we see is of a vending machine dispensing ‘Live Bait’ in the form of a film canister. A woman opens the canister to find fish roe (eggs). The equation of fish roe and film, no doubt a nod to the Surrealists, opens up those ontological quandaries around mediation and truth. It is this promise of direct contact along with the return “Home” in the film’s title that gives some sign that the highly processed landscapes belong to the unconscious. (Lux, London - Janine Marchessault)

    Jennifer Reeves has made 25+ film-works since 1990; from avant-garde shorts to expanded cinema performances and experimental features. Reeves’ work has shown extensively from the Berlin, Toronto, and Hong Kong Film Festivals to the Museum of Modern Art, universities, and microcinemas worldwide. Reeves’ acclaimed visceral and personal works immerse viewers in intricate, unfamiliar cinematic territory. Her work elucidates themes of mental health, feminism and sexuality and the natural world.

    Reeves started making films in 1990. She continues to do her own writing, cinematography, editing, and sound design. Her subjective and personal films push the boundaries of film through optical-printing and direct-on-film techniques.
    Since 2003 Reeves has collaborated with celebrated composers/ performers, including Marc Ribot, Skúli Sverrisson, Elliott Sharp, Zeena Parkins, Anthony Burr and Eyvind Kang. As the daughter of a trumpeter, gravitating toward film and music collaborations was quite natural for Reeves. Her most ambitious film and music performance, the feature-length double-projection WHEN IT WAS BLUE (2008), premiered at Toronto International Film Festival with live music by composer/collaborator Skúli Sverrisson. Her multiple-projection films with live music have been performed internationally, from the Sydney Opera House and the Berlinale to RedCat in Los Angeles and the Wexner Center in Ohio.
    Reeves has taught film and animation courses at The Cooper Union School of Art since 2005.

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    Hardwood Process
    13:30 min 1997 16mm Silent (USA/Canada)
    By David Gatten

    A history of scarred surfaces, an inquiry, and an imagining: For the marks we see and the marks we make, for the languages we can read and for those we are trying to learn. Reproduced by hand on an old contact printer resulting in individual, unique release prints. - David Gatten

    Hardwood Process made by David Gatten is a handmade diary film, which not only records scarred surfaces of the hands, the floors and the film emulsion, but also reveals his memories of the emotional events. Gatten started making Hardwood Process as he was participating in Film Farm Retreat in 1996. During the Film Farm Retreat, Gatten learned to experiment with various hand processing techniques, chemical treatments, and optical and contact printing. He was excited about this experience and intended to make something about it. As he says in Interview With David Gatten, an article in Adventures of Perception: Cinema as Exploration- Essays/Interviews written by Scott MacDonald, “I wanted to make a contribution to the conversation; I wanted to share what I was excited about.”

    Over the last 19 years, David Gatten (b. 1971, Ann Arbor, Michigan) has explored the intersection of the printed word and moving image. The resulting body of work illuminates a wide array of historical, conceptual, and material concerns while cataloging the variety of ways in which texts function in cinema as both language and image, often blurring the boundary between these categories. These movies measure the movement of desire across distance, and the manner in which words, books, letters, and other written or printed communications might both produce and mediate that distance.
    Using traditional research methods (reading old books) and non-traditional film processes (boiling old books) the films trace the contours of private lives and public histories, combining philosophy, biography, and poetry with experiments in cinematic forms and narrative structures. Exploring the archive in unusual ways and making connections across categories of knowledge and fields of meaning, Gatten’s movies construct new compositions and generate unexpected conclusions from 19th c. scientific treatises, “out-dated” 20th c. instructional texts, and rare books from 18th c. personal libraries.

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    Unless You’re Living It
    8:22 16mm to HDV Sd., 2019 (USA/Canada)
    By Sarah Bliss

    A portrait of place and power in rural white Ontario that challenges the correlation between seeing and knowing, and the ravages of late-stage capitalism. Hand processing, contact printing, tinting and toning engage the film as a body that, like the residents of Mount Forest, sustains injuries, wounds and burdens, but also has the capacity for delight, revelatory pleasure, and transformation.

    I’m a filmmaker, artist, educator and Buddhist practitioner who facilitates presence and attunement with the sensate, desiring body. I work artisanally with hand-processed celluloid film and with video to make experimental and documentary films, kinesthetic immersive installations, artist books and performance that engage personal and social history. Of particular interest is the relationship between art practice and dharma practice. My work is shared and screened internationally at museums, galleries, film festivals, microcinemas, and backyards. I’ve been recognized with fellowships from the Flaherty Seminar, the Massachusetts Cultural Council (2019 Film and Video finalist; 2013 New Media/Installation fellow), and Scotland’s Alchemy Film Festival, am an Independent Imaging Retreat alum, and a recipient of a Lightpress Grant from the Interbay Cinema Society. I received a Masters in Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School, teach cameraless filmmaking, and am a member of Boston’s AgX Film Collective.
    - Sarah Bliss

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    Casa de la Noche (House of Nights)
    13:30 min 16mm to HDV Sd 2017 (Cuba/Canada)
    By Marcel Beltran

    This is Cuban filmmaker Marcel Beltran’s poetic dirge about his country as told by his father in the last days of his life. Beltran uses techniques of hand processing, solarisation, split toning and tinting to reflect the depth of emotions which weave through this portrait of Havana. “Shot in Havana and processed at Phil Hoffman's Film Farm, Marcel Beltrán's Casa de la Noche explores those same histories from the point of view of an insider, as a lived experience that is evocatively mirrored through ripped and torn celluloid.” — Chris Kennedy, TIFF

    Marcel Beltrán (b. 1985, Moa, Cuba) is a film director, editor and producer currently living and working in São Paulo, Brazil. His films have screened internationally at festivals such as IDFA, Hot Docs, MoMA Doc Fortnight, Locarno, DOC NYC, RIDM, FICG, among others. Founder of Mediocielo Films, professor at EICTV and Chavón | The School of Design, consultant for projects in development and facilitator for sustainability in the arts. He is currently in the writing phase of MOA, his first fiction feature film.

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    Dandelion
    2:15 min 16mm to HDV Silent 2018 (Aust./Netherlands/U.K./Canada)
    By Karel Doing

    A couple of years ago I have discovered new possibilities for the creation of images on film-emulsion by using the internal chemistry of plants. This technique is a combination of photograms and chemigrams and because of the lack of an accurate term I have named this method 'phytogram'. I have worked with this idea in my back garden, using available plants and weeds. Dandelions turned out yield particularly good results. This short film is entirely dedicated to the power and beauty of this humble plant. –Karel Doing

    Karel Doing is an experimental filmmaker and researcher who has worked across the globe with fellow artists and filmmakers, creating a body of work that is difficult to pinpoint with a simple catchphrase. In Ruins and Resilience he weaves autobiographical elements and critical reviews together with his wide ranging interdisciplinary approach, reflecting on his own practice by positioning key works within the context of a vibrant experimental film scene in Europe, North and South America, and Asia. Doing demonstrates how experimental filmmakers have continued to renew their practice despite the almost total demise of analog motion picture film and the constant neglect of this art form by institutions and critics. Written in a fluent and accessible style, the book looks into the connections between the work of groundbreaking artists within the field and subjects such as transgression, improvisation, collectivity, materiality, phenomenology, and perception. Specifically, intersections with music and sound are investigated, appealing to the idea of the cross-modal brain, the ability to perceive sounds and images in an integrated way. Instead of looking again at the "golden era" of experimental film, the book starts in the 1980s, showing how this art form has never ceased to surprise and inspire. The author's hands-on engagement with the medium is formational for his more theoretical approach and writing, making the book a highly original contribution in the field that is informative and inspiring for academic and practitioners alike.

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    It Matters What
    9 min 16mm to HDV Sd 2019 (Chile/Canada)
    By Francisca Duran

    Absences and translations motivate this experimental animation in an exploration of the methods and materials of reproduction and inscription. The inquiry is set within a framework elucidated through theorist Donna Haraway, taken from her essay Tentacular Thinking: Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene. Enigmatic found-footage calls into question human violence over animal species. Plant life is both the subject matter of the images and assists the means of photographic reproduction. The techniques used include in-camera animation, contact-prints and phytograms created by the exposure of 16mm film overlaid with plant material and dried for hours in direct sunlight.

    Francisca Duran is a Chilean-Canadian experimental media artist who creates films, video installation, and 2D, photo-based, mixed-media works about history, memory and violence. Duran has exhibited internationally at film festivals and venues including Edinburgh International Film Festival, International Film Festival at Rotterdam, HotDocs, Arkipel, Anthology Film Archives, Los Angeles Film Forum, John Hansard Gallery and Gallery 44. Duran holds an M.F.A. from York University and a B.A.H. from Queen’s University. Her practice has been supported by research, travel, and production grants from the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Arts Council, and the Toronto Arts Council.

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    Ancestors’ Gift
    3 min 16mm to HDV Sd 2019 (Saugeen Nation/Canada)
    By Natalka Pucan

    This film explains the message of the Dish and One Spoon Treaty and what that message means to one Anishnabek family. This films shows how Anishnabek ancestors work through the people to maintain and strengthen our individual sovereignty to the land and its resources and how it is passed from one generation to another.

    Natalka Pucan is a proud member of the Anishinabek Nation and registered member of Saugeen First Nation. Throughout her career she has worked with children and youth in a variety of capacities. Currently, she works as an Ojibway language instructor in a public school setting. Her work has focused on teaching children and youth about their culture and heritage. An avid beader, sewer and dancer, Natalka uses cultural knowledge and heritage as a catalyst and guide when developing her art. A new and emerging artist in the film field, Natalka Pucan tells stories of her people and nationhood. Natalka is beginning to develop stories through the film lens. Learning in the field to bring stories to life thru song and picture. Film making is another avenue for Natalka to express and share cultural stories and tales.

    STOF is a result of a collaboration of the Saugeen First Nation Employment and Training Centre, Fabulous Festival of Fringe Film and the Film Farm.

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    Everything is Right Here
    5:47 min 16mm to HDV Sd 2021 (Saugeen Nation/Canada)
    By Adrian Kahgee

    In Everything is Right Here, I present my metaphorical survival bag, as influenced by an Anishnaabekwe Elder’s words, ”Everything we need is right here! All we have to do is give thanks.” In giving thanks, we acknowledge that there is an interdependence amongst all our relations. I explore this framework of understanding through my film, which I hand processed using flowers. I chose to work with processing in dandelions, a plant that is not native to my territory, and with trilliums which are indigenous to our territory. At the center of my metaphorical bag is cultural knowledge that is deeply woven into the land and offered up to me in aid, as I navigate and adapt to change. As represented through my dress, made of an emergency survival blanket, I carry and wear that knowledge through change. I accept these gifts and the responsibilities that come with them, for everything I touch, I change.

    Kahgee from Saugeen First Nation territory, develops her film with dandelions (a colonial plant) and trilliums (indigenous to the Saugeen territory) to consider their histories (how they came to be on the land) and their medicinal properties. At the center of my metaphorical bag writes Kahgee, is cultural knowledge that is deeply woven into the land. Plants are also connected to understanding the world in terms of change, transformation, survival and interconnectedness. –Janine Marchessault & Philip Hoffman, “Blooming Harmonics: Feminist Ecologies of Process Cinema”, Expanded Nature, Lightcone, 2022.

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    Friday
    March.15
    9PM
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    • Friday, March. 15th, 9PM
      Harvard Fas CAMLab
      Lower Auditorium
      485 Broadway
      Cambridge MA 02138



    Philip Hoffman

    Collaborations & Meditations
    45-year practice



    The short films in this program reflect a mix of formal experiments and collaborations that often feed into and fuel some of my longer poetic narratives, essay and autobiographical films, spanning my 45-year practice. The first half of the program are mid-career works which experiment with techniques of fragmentation through shooting, editing and through photo-chemical processes. The second part of the program consists of more recent works, where the worlds of plants and animals, both domesticated and wild, rub up against a filmmaking ecology derived primarily from various hand-made filmmaking processes: flower-processing/tinting as well as biodegradation/decay techniques of celluloid. – Philip Hoffman

    Sponsored by RPM Festival, Harvard FAS CAMLab, Art and Art History Department & Cinema Studies Program at UMB, SCMS ExFM SIG (Society for Cinema and Media Studies Experimental Film and Media Special Interest Group)






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    river
    15 minutes 16mm Sil. & Sd., 1978-89
    thanks to Richard Kerr, Bruce Gauthier, Garrick Filewod

    Kokoro is for Heart
    7 min., 16mm Optical Printed, Sd., 1999
    Philip Hoffman (Camera, Optical Printing and Editing)
    Sound Composition and Performance: Gerry Shikatani

    Chimera
    15 min., S8 Kodachrome Optical Printed to 16mm, Sd., 1995
    Music: Tucker Zimmerman

    Flowers #3 (Kissed by the Sun)
    10 min., 35mm photogram to HDV, Sil., 2024.
    By Philip Hoffman in collaboration with Alexander Granger and Jason O’Hara

    Deep 1
    15 min., 35mm or 16mm Flower-Processed to HDV, Sd & Sil., 2023

    Total: 62 mins

    Post-screening discussion:
    Philip Hoffman & Kathryn Ramey

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    A film artist of memory and association, Philip Hoffman has long been recognized as Canada’s pre-eminent diary filmmaker.

    Philip Hoffman was born in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, from families of European immigrant-settlers who came to Canada (Winnipeg/paternal and Kapuskasing/maternal) in the 1920’s. Hoffman’s filmmaking began with his boyhood interest in photography. As semi-official historian of family life, he became intrigued by questions of reality in photography and later in cinema. After completing his formal education which includes a Diploma in Media Arts at Sheridan College and a Bachelor of Arts in Literature at Wilfrid Laurier University, Hoffman began working on his films, as well as teaching film, electronic and computer-based media in the Media Arts Program at Sheridan College. Currently Hoffman teaches in the Cinema and Media Arts Department at York University.

    For over twenty years he has been straining history through personal fictions, using the material of his life to deconstruct the Griersonian legacy of documentary practice. As an artist working directly upon the material of film, Hoffman is keenly attuned to the shape of seeing, foregrounding the image and its creation as well as the manufacture of point of view. Hoffman’s films are deeply troubled in their remembrances; he dusts off the family archive to examine how estrangement fuels a fascination with the familiar surroundings of home.

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    river
    15 minutes 16mm Sil. & Sd., 1978-89 Thanks to Richard Kerr, Bruce Gauthier, Garrick Filewod

    “river is a geographical portrait photographed over the course of a decade in four distinct styles, it is a meditation on natural flux and the inexorable temper of change, and the way technology mediates our encounters with our environment. It marks, above all, a return to a childhood pastoral retreat.” – Mike Hoolboom, Fringe Film in Canada, 1997.

    “The Saugeen River was named Sauking, ‘where it all flows out,’ by the Ojibwa in the early 1800s. It runs into Lake Huron, in central Ontario. The place where I know it is twenty miles south of Owen Sound, near Williamsford, where I spent lots of time in my youth exploring. The film is an archaeology of how I have come to know this river, shot over 12 years.”
    In 1977, I arrived with a wind-up 16mm Bolex and one roll of 16mm colour film a shot an in-camera passage, no editing; in 1981 I returned with a half inch, reel-to-reel black and white video portapak and captured the river’s flow; in 1984, indoors, I used a rear screen set-up to copy the footage shot in 1977. Finally, in 1989, I went for the first time beneath the surface of the water, the 16mm camera loaded with the ‘mysterious’ black and white hi-con printer stock, with thoughts of loss, and my uncles sudden death, on my mind. – P. Hoffman

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    Kokoro is for Heart
    7 min., 16mm Optical Printed, Sd., 1999.
    By Philip Hoffman (Camera, Optical Printing and Editing)
    Sound Composition and Performance: Gerry Shikatani

    Kokoro is for Heart features poet Gerry Shikatani and explores the relationships surrounding language, image and sound, set to the backdrop of a gravel pit down the road from the Film Farm.

    “…introducing a glitch into the material that can either be rejected as a mistake or accepted as part of the process. As Hoffman describes: When I got the footage back from the lab I was disappointed because of the periodic flipping of the image. I soon realised that the malfunctioning camera rendered the filmed-nature, unnatural…what is nature? What is natural?” – Kim Knowles, Experimental Film and Photochemical Practices, 2020

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    Chimera
    15 min., S8 Kodachrome Optical Printed to 16mm, Sd., 1995.
    Music: Tucker Zimmerman

    “The film consists of collected, diaristic images amassed through Hoffman’s travels. Uluru... Russian shoppers, a Cairo market, and day to day images from home and away... make floating appearances. These have been gathered on the run, and then reconstituted with an uncanny ephemeral floating rhythm, a dance of light, and replaying, with commendable control, the idea of visual music, visual jazz. Though the method of collection may have had an air of arbitrariness about it, the meticulous construction and focus on rhythm in the finished piece suggest an artist who has learnt to master technique so as to let it speak for him about ‘other’ things.” - Dirk de Bruyn, Melbourne Film Festival Catalogue 1996

    “In 1989 I finished the film Kitchener-Berlin and put a close to a cycle of work which dealt directly with myself, and how self is expressed/constructed cinematically. At the same time I took my old super-8 camera out of the closet, and began collecting images, using the single-frame-zoom. Cubist in its visual delivery, the single-frame-zoom builds a splayed reality that brings together disparate vantage points simultaneously, and serves as the glue that blends and bonds peoples, places and spaces in Chimera.
    The film was shot during a time when I had the opportunity to travel, a time of tremendous change when the Berlin Wall was coming down and the internet was going up, between 1989 and 1992 in Leningrad, London, Cairo, Helsinki, Sydney and Uluru. It was optically printed and edited in Helsinki in 1992; completed in Mount Forest in 1995.” - P. Hoffman

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    Flowers #3 (Kissed by the Sun)
    10 min., 35mm photogram to HDV, Sil., 2024.
    By Philip Hoffman in collaboration with Alexander Granger and Jason O’Hara

    These motion picture photograms were initiated through a five hour plunge into the darkroom; remembering the Galician celebration of flowers on the road in Baiona, near Vigo in 2019, here too we made a floral carpet of photograms. – P.Hoffman

    A Procession of herbs “emerge in all their structures, colors and epidermis. The motion picture itself becomes a plant which delicately stretches petioles and petals.” – Séance #3-Sentir Comme une Plante, Muséum National d’Histoire naturelle, Paris.

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    Deep 1
    15 min., 35mm or 16mm Flower-Processed to HDV, Sd & Sil., 2023

    In Deep 1 winged and four legged animals, both wild and domestic, traverse the frame marked by a hand-made practice.

    Filmed from 2020 - 2022, processed and decayed with hyacinth & lichen extract, the film is built on a sustainable practice: images and the imaging making process evolve out of "a complex material engagement with an eco-system that draws out the expressive possibilities of living things beyond conventional forms of representation". -Kim Knowles on Hoffman's practice from “Experimental Film and Photochemical Practices”, 2020.

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    Saturday
    March.16
    7PM
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    • Saturday, March. 16th, 7PM
      Harvard Fas CAMLab
      Lower Auditorium
      485 Broadway
      Cambridge MA 02138



    Jim Finn

    THE APOCALYPTIC IS THE MOTHER OF ALL CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY
    Written & Directed by Jim Finn

    Runtime: 63mins52secs, 2023


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    A psychedelic portrait of the founding theorist of Christianity. The story of Paul the Apostle’s life, ideology and influence is told by piecing together 20th Century 16mm and cassette propaganda, board games, animation, reenactments, Roman Empire doom metal and covers of Catholic liturgical music. The gentle Paul themes with flute, acoustic guitar and mellotron contrasts with the Demonic Roman Empire themes of electric guitar, drums and synth. Performance artist Linda Montano and filmmaker Usama Alshaibi portray Paul on his journeys. The film tries to capture the disturbing reaction Paul and his letters had in the early days of Christianity. The use of live action, animation, found footage and original music was a way to recover his biography from the brains of 20th Century humans so that in some perhaps misguided Utopian impulse, we can build something new out of it for the future. “

    Sponsored by RPM Festival, Harvard FAS CAMLab, Art and Art History Department & Cinema Studies Program at UMB, SCMS ExFM SIG (Society for Cinema and Media Studies Experimental Film and Media Special Interest Group)






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    “Holy reconstructions of the sons of God, Jim Finn! Our favorite political atomizer gets holy in his new documentary crusade and decides to tell the story of the apostle Paul…”

    — Buenos Aires Festival Internacional de Cine Independiente 2023

    “The curious title refers to a paper of the German theologist Ernst Käsemann, whose research snatched Paul from the grasp of the Antisemites who had usurped him and placed him back in the tradition of Jewish mysticism. That is also the objective of Jim Finn’s film as it gleefully dissects two thousand years of appropriation and propaganda in a wild ride through history.”

    —DOK Leipzig

    Post-screening discussion:
    Jim Finn & Jocelyn E. Marshall

    Dr. Jocelyn E. Marshall is faculty in the Departments of Visual & Media Arts and Writing, Literature, & Publishing at Emerson College. She previously was a Dissertation Scholar at Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center. Their interdisciplinary projects focus on contemporary U.S.-based diasporic women and LGBTQ+ artists and writers, researching relationships between historical trauma and queer and feminist activism. Her research has been supported by the Mark Diamond Research Foundation, New York Public Library, J. Burton Harter Foundation, Cornell University’s School of Criticism and Theory, the Trauma Research Foundation, and several home institutions and professional organizations. They have work featured or forthcoming in the Journal of American Culture, Women & Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory, Journal of Cinema and Media Studies, Public Art Dialogue, and Tripwire: A Journal of Poetics, among others. She has also curated exhibitions of contemporary art, including Being In-Between | In-Between Being (UB Art Galleries, 2020-21) and Creativity in the Time of Covid-19 (Buffalo Arts Studio, Buffalo Game Space, and Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center, 2023). In 2022, they co-edited a collection on Trauma-Informed Pedagogy: Addressing Gender-Based Violence in the Classroom, and in Spring 2023 edited an issue of Rutgers University’s feminist journal Rejoinder, themed “Textual-Sexual-Spiritual: Artistic Practice and Other Rituals as Queer Becoming and Beyond.” She currently co-chairs the Gender & Feminisms Caucus at the Society for Cinema & Media Studies and is a contributing editor at Art Journal Open for the Feminist Interview Project Series.

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    ABOUT THE DIRECTOR

    Jim Finn’s movies have been called ‘Utopian comedies’ and ‘trompe l’oeil films’. The New York Times wrote, “Steeped in the obsolete language of revolutionary art, Mr. Finn’s meticulous, deadpan mockumentaries often play like unearthed artifacts from an alternate universe." His work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. His films have screened at international, avant-garde and underground film festivals like Rotterdam, Valdivia, BAFICI and the New York Film Festival as well as museums, cinematheques and microcinemas. He was born in St. Louis in 1968 and was raised by Catholic Midwestern salespeople.

    Aura Photograph of the director by Glenna van Nostrand

    DIRECTOR STATEMENT

    When I began the research into Paul the Apostle, I didn’t realize how many new books were written annually about him with new translations, interpretations and historical research. For scholars, the gospels and letters of Paul are archeological treasures revealing new things for each generation about the times they were written in and the people they were written for. I structured the film about Paul’s life, obsessions and legends on ancient Greek words in his letters: Apocalypsis (unmasking, unveiling, revelation), Charismata (divinely conferred gifts), Porneia (illicit sexual activity weirdly translated as fornication), Ethnos (pagan gentiles), Ekklesia (democratic assembly of believers), Koinonia (fellowship), Stenazo (the groaning pain of laboring through childbirth), Pistis (faithfulness or loyalty) and Parousia (presence of God, the arrival of the Kingdom of God on Earth).



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    Saturday
    March.16
    9PM
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    • Saturday, March. 16th, 9PM
      Harvard Fas CAMLab
      Lower Auditorium
      485 Broadway
      Cambridge MA 02138



    Breathscapes

    Curated by Kalpana Subramanian

    Thirteen experimental works that take us on a journey into landscapes of ‘ cinematic breath .’ Piercing through layers of cinematic materiality and consciousness, the films in this program explore the embodied and affective materialities of the medium. Remediating the world through memory, absence, loss, rapture, longing, they collectively evoke a 'breathful' poetics of cinema. This program, curated by Kalpana Subramanian features works by Sandeep Ashwath, Louise Bourque, Crystal Z Campbell, Erin Espelie, Ja’tovia Gary, Janie Geiser, Anna Kipervaser, Lynn Marie Kirby, Kim Munro, Peter Rose, Lei Lei + Thomas Sauvin and Erica Sheu.

    Sponsored by RPM Festival, Harvard FAS CAMLab, Art and Art History Department & Cinema Studies Program at UMB, SCMS ExFM SIG (Society for Cinema and Media Studies Experimental Film and Media Special Interest Group)


    Kalpana Subramanian, PhD is an artist-filmmaker and educator interested in experimenting with film and media through transcultural and interdisciplinary approaches. Her films have been screened at international festivals including the Yamagata International Documentary Film Festival, Toronto International FIlm Festival, Antimatter Media Arts Festival, Flaherty NYC, Chicago Underground Film Festival, and ULTRA Cinema MX to name a few. She has received an Audience Award at the Documentary Festival of History and Archeology (Italy, 2015), an Award for Creative Approach as well as Award for Cinematography (2003) at the Montana CINE International Film Festival) and a Jury's special mention at the CMS Vatavaran Film Festival among other honors. A recipient of a 2024 New York State Council on the Arts award, she is also a recipient of a Fulbright Academic and Professional Excellence fellowship at the University of Colorado Boulder (2015-16), a Humanities Institute fellowship at the University at Buffalo (2022-23) and a UK Environmental Film Fellowship (2006). Subramanian curates film programs and is also a founder of the two series: Cinema of Breath and Meterial Universe. At present she is an Assistant Teaching Professor at the Department of Media Study at the State University of New York at Buffalo.




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    Transcript
    | 2019, 3'7'' min, color, silent |
    - Erica Sheu


    Incantation
    | 1968-1972, 8'54'', color, sound |
    - Peter Rose


    Grihastha
    | 2020, 1'58'', BW, sound |
    - Sandeep Ashwath


    Gavia stellata (Sea Mew Set with Stars)
    | 2023, 3', color, sound |
    - Erin Espelie


    to hold, to miss
    | 2017, 2' 50'', color, sound |
    - Lynn Marie Kirby


    Currency
    | 2019, 2'53'', color, sound |
    - Crystal Z Campbell


    Absent Objects
    | 2020, 7'41'', color, sound |
    - Janie Geiser


    Recycled
    | 2013, 5'40'', color, sound |
    - Lei Lei + Thomas Sauvin


    An Ecstatic Experience
    | 2015, 6'11'', color, sound |
    - Ja’tovia Gary


    The Futorical Society
    | 2023, 17' , color, sound
    - Kim Munro


    pài-la̍k ē-poo
    | 2020, 1'57, color, sound |
    - Erica Sheu


    With the Tide, with the tide
    | 2022, 2'47, color, silent |
    - Anna Kipervaser


    Total: 70mins



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    Transcript 臨摹
    | 2019, 3'7'' min, color, silent |
    - Erica Sheu

    A fragile film on intimacy. The filmmaker transcribes feelings on film and Sunprint paper with Baby's-breath flowers, its shadow, and old love letters of her father.

    Erica Sheu/徐璐 is a Taiwanese experimental filmmaker whose work reflects spontaneous playfulness, poignancy, and poetic interactions among diaries, cross-generational memories, tactilities, and celluloid film. Her experimental short films have been shown at TIFF Wavelengths, NYFF Currents, IFFR Bright Future, EXiS, TIDF, among others. She holds an MFA in Film/Video from CalArts and currently lives and works in Los Angeles. Sheu is a founding member of the Taiwan-based experimental film collective, ReaRflex 後照鏡.

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    Incantation
    | 1968-1972, 8'54'', color, sound |
    - Peter Rose

    Using rapidly edited, superimposed images of plants, trees, water, the sun and the moon, Incantation weaves a dynamic tapestry of organic forms and textures, combining its images with a fierce rhythmic intensity so as to suggest a kind of natural force. The film was shot entirely in the camera in 8mm. The track is breath-based and was derived from Islamic liturgy.

    Since 1968 Peter Rose has made over forty films, tapes, performances and installations. Many of the early works raise intriguing questions about the nature of time, space, light, and perception and draw upon Rose’s background in mathematics and on the influence of structuralist filmmakers. He subsequently became interested in language as a subject and in video as a medium and generated a substantial body of work that played with the feel and form of sense, concrete texts, political satire, oddball performance, and a kind of intellectual comedy. Recent video installations have involved a return to an examination of landscape, time, and vision. Rose has been widely exhibited, both nationally and internationally, having been included in shows at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Biennial, the Centre Pompidou, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Film Society at Lincoln Center, and the Rotterdam International Film Festival. He has been awarded fellowships by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Pew Foundation, the Independence Foundation, and the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, and is fond of writing descriptions in the third person.

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    Grihastha
    | 2020, 1'58'', BW, sound |
    - Sandeep Ashwath

    Grihastha is the second stage in the four stages of human life in the Hindu Brahmin tradition. Here the Brahmin boy with the sacred thread becomes a man, taking on the role of a householder. The film celebrates him as a sexual being, and breaks the taboo by queering the gaze.

    Sandeep C. Ashwath is an animator and anthropologist. As an animator, he has worked with traditional forms of Indian storytelling and then moved to exploring verse/text through digitally hand drawn animation. He is a graduate of the Royal College of Art - London, and is currently the Associate Dean of the School of Media, Arts and Sciences at Srishti Manipal Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Bengaluru, India.

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    Gavia stellata (Sea Mew Set with Stars)
    | 2023, 3', color, sound |
    - Erin Espelie

    Replication in "contemporary society is characterized by the loss of data, degradation, and noise." (Lev Manovich) Reproducing original watercolors for The Birds of America—which were augmented with friable pastel, chalk, and crayon—caused the naturalist John James Audubon (born Jean Rabin) much consternation; for the red-throated loon (plate 202), he relied upon engraver Robert Havell, who charged £114 for one ream (500 sheets) of paper, copper plates, tin shipping cases, and the work of etching, printing, and aquatinting.

    Erin Espelie is a writer, editor, and filmmaker whose work connects with current scientific research, questions of epistemology, environmental precarity, and fallout from an increasingly image saturated culture. Her poetic, nonfiction films have shown at the New York Film Festival, the British Film Institute's London Film Festival, the Whitechapel Gallery, the International Film Festival Rotterdam, Crossroads Film Festival at SFMoMA, the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Imagine Science Film Festival, and more. Her feature-length film, The Lanthanide Series, premiered at CPH:DOX in Copenhagen and won the grand prize at the Seoul International New Media Festival in 2015; an interview about the film appears in The Sublimity of Document: Cinema as Diorama (Oxford University Press, 2019).

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    to hold, to miss
    | 2017, 2' 50'', color, sound |
    - Lynn Marie Kirby

    The video is a document of a Venice Biennale intervention in 2017 of the same title. The public was invited to sit with me in the making of attempts to find the tender gesture from a stolen Giovanni Bellini painting. Bellini’s “Madonna and Child” painted in 1480 was stolen from the Madonna dell’Orto church in 1993.
    Bathed in a scent created for the project, dressed as the missing Madonna, I sat silently in one of two chairs in the square outside the church where the painting had been stolen, and held members of the public in attempts to find the missing tender gesture from the painting.
    No images of the performance were taken. As a document of the event, 16mm film was exposed, without a camera, to the light of the site.
    After processing the 16mm film, the film was transferred to video, and sounds and images taken from the time of the performance were embedded on top of the site exposure.
    Site performance in collaboration with Sarah Bird.

    Lynn Marie Kirby is occupied with questions of place, the residue of history, and liminal states. Her practice engages different sensory systems, depends on improvisation and collaboration, accidents that make her jump, and forms of contemplation. Kirby has shown at galleries, museums and film festivals around the world. Many generous institutions, foundations, and people have supported her projects. Kirby is Professor Emerita of Graduate Fine Arts and Film at California College of the Arts.

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    Currency
    | 2019, 2'53'', color, sound |
    - Crystal Z Campbell

    CURRENCY (2019) is a sound film of refusal––a woman wears bygone forms of currency on the tips of her hair while preserving the greatest currency for herself.

    Crystal Z Campbell , a 2021 Guggenheim Fellow in Fine Arts, is a multidisciplinary artist, experimental filmmaker, and writer of Black, Filipinx, and Chinese descents Campbell finds complexity in public secrets—fragments of information known by many but undertold or unspoken. Campbell’s works use underloved archival material to consider historical gaps––from the narrative of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, questions of immortality and medical ethics with Henrietta Lacks' “immortal” cell line, and gentrification via a 35mm film relic salvaged from a demolished Black activist theater in Brooklyn. Campbell’s most recent film, REVOLVER, is an archive of pareidolia (a situation in which someone sees a pattern or image of something that does not exist) narrated by a descendent of Exodusters. Campbell’s creative practice spans painting, sculpture, performance, film, writing, and site-specific installations.

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    Absent Objects
    | 2020, 7'41'', color, sound |
    - Janie Geiser

    Absent Objects Film by Janie Geiser
    Sound design: Janie Geiser
    Sound mix: Kari Rae Seekins
    Digital Mastering: Astra Price

    Three empty photo albums, vessels of lost time and memory beyond reach.

    Janie Geiser is a multidisciplinary artist whose practice includes performance, film, installation, and visual art. Geiser’s work is known for its recontextualization of abandoned images and objects, its embrace of artifice, and its investigation of memory, power, and loss. Geiser is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Doris Duke Artist Award recipient, and a Creative Capital awardee.
    “Geiser gives voice to the reaches of the unconscious, pointing to the abandoned splendor that exists prior to the rules of society and language.” (—Holly Willis, Res,2004).
    Geiser’s films have been screened at the National Gallery of Art, Microscope Gallery, the Whitney Museum, the Guggenheim Museum, MOMA, Pacific Film Archives, the Centre Pompidou, the Salzburg Museum, San Francisco MOMA, LACMA, the Sharjah Biennial, and NY Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, London International Film Festival, Oberhausen Film Festival, Curtas Vila do Conde, and Hong Kong International Film Festival.
    Geiser’s films are in the collections of MOMA, The NY Public Library’s Donnell Media Center, CalArts, and BAMPFA. Her film The Red Book is part of the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. The Academy of Motion Pictures Archive has selected her work for preservation, and The Fourth Watch (2000) was selected by Film Comment as one of the top ten experimental films of the past decade.

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    Recycled
    | 2013, 5'40'', color, sound |
    - Lei Lei + Thomas Sauvin

    The following images come from negatives salvaged from a recycling plant on the edge of Beijing, where they had been sent to be filtered for their silver nitrate content. Over the years French collector Thomas Sauvin built this archive of more than half a million 35mm negatives, depicting the capital and the life of her inhabitants over the last thirty years. From 2011 to 2013, Chinese artist Lei Lei selected over 3000 photos to create the animation you are about to see, an almost epic portrait of anonymous humanity. The film is the winner of Grand Prix shorts - non-narrative at the 2013 Holland International animation film festival, Nenarativní animace at the 12th Anifest International animation festival, Special Mentions by the jury members in 12th Countryside Animafest Cyprus. and Official Selected by Annecy International Animation Festival 2013.

    Lei Lei (b. 1985 in Nanchang, Jiangxi Province) is an experimental animation artist also working with video art, painting, installation, music and VJ performance. He received a master's degree in animation from Tsinghua University (2009) and his film This is LOVE was awarded the Best Narrative Short at the Ottawa International Animation Festival in 2010. Recycled won the Winner Grand Prix shorts - non-narrative at Holland Animation Film Festival (HAFF, 2013). He has been on the jury of the Zagreb Animation Festival and HAFF. Honored by an Asian Cultural Council grant (2014) he was a faculty at CalArts Experimental Animation program in 2017. He was invited to be a New Academy Member for the Short Films and Feature Animation branch in 2018. His first feature film Breathless Animals was selected by Berlinale Forum in 2019.

    Thomas Sauvin is a French collector and artist who has bee salvaging discarded negatives from a recycling plant on the edge of Beijing, since 2009. His Beijing Silvermine archive, one of the largest archival projects in China, now encompassing over 850000 anonymous photographs spanning 1985-2005, thus allowing the reconstruction of a large part of the history of popular analogue photography. Sauvin has had exhibitions of his work, and published through Archive of Modern Conflict.

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    An Ecstatic Experience
    | 2015, 6'11'', color, sound | - Ja’tovia Gary
    By Marcel Beltran

    A meditative invocation on transcendence as a means of restoration.

    Ja’Tovia M. Gary is an artist and filmmaker. Gary’s work seeks to liberate the distorted histories through which Black life is often viewed while fleshing out a nuanced and multivalent Black interiority. Through documentary film, experimental video art, and installation Gary charts the ways structures of power shape our perceptions around representation, race, gender, sexuality, and violence.

    In 2017 Gary was named one of Filmmaker Magazine’s 25 New Faces of Independent Filmmaking. Her award-winning films, An Ecstatic Experience and Giverny I (Négresse Impériale) have screened at festivals, cinemas, and institutions worldwide including Edinburgh International Film Festival, The Whitney Museum, Anthology Film Archives, Atlanta Film Festival, the Schomburg Center, MoMa PS1, MoCA Los Angeles, Harvard Film Archives, New Orleans Film Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival and elsewhere. She has received generous support from Sundance Documentary fund, the Jerome Foundation, Doc Society, among others.

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    The Futorical Society
    | 2023, 17' , color, sound
    - Kim Munro

    The Futorical Society (and the woman who killed the weeds) weaves together precious and curious objects, local wildlife, built and natural landscapes and the story of the little-known agricultural hero, Vera Molnar, who saved the local grain industry in the Mallee region of rural Victoria. Through the interplay between history and future, and fixed and ephemeral, The Futorical Society presents a way to reimagine the past, present and future of settler-colonial Australia.

    Kim Munro has a background in photography and fine art and is a documentary researcher and practitioner who works across installation, film, audio and performance. Her work explores entangled histories of place, people and archives as well as ways of being together. Her work has been screened on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation as well as at local and international galleries and festivals. She has participated in residencies in Iceland, regional Victoria and Adelaide. Kim’s current projects include The Art of Work is a Work of Art, a documentary theatre installation about the feminist and experimental performance company Vitalstatistix. She has also organised documentary events and symposia and run filmmaking workshops around climate change in the Solomon Islands with UN Habitat.
    Kim has written on a range of documentary styles, genres and forms and is the co-editor of Constructions of the Real: Intersections of documentary-based film practice and theory (2023, Intellect). Kim was the conference programmer for the Australian International Documentary Conferences (AIDC) and in 2023 founded the Adelaide-based Documentary Film Society which is dedicated to showing local and international nonfiction films to new audiences. Currently she is based at the University of South Australia in Adelaide as a lecturer in film and media.

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    pài-la̍k ē-poo 拜六下晡
    | 2020, 1'57, color, sound |
    - Erica Sheu

    A half-moon on the blue sky. A quiet offering connects the unreachable world with the physical earth. A Japanese childhood song comes in the wind. In Taiwanese, we promised Grandma that the next time we visit is Saturday afternoon. (pài-la̍k ē-poo means Saturday afternoon in Taiwanese Holouē.)

    Erica Sheu/徐璐 is a Taiwanese experimental filmmaker whose work reflects spontaneous playfulness, poignancy, and poetic interactions among diaries, cross-generational memories, tactilities, and celluloid film. Her experimental short films have been shown at TIFF Wavelengths, NYFF Currents, IFFR Bright Future, EXiS, TIDF, among others. She holds an MFA in Film/Video from CalArts and currently lives and works in Los Angeles. Sheu is a founding member of the Taiwan-based experimental film collective, ReaRflex 後照鏡.

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    With the Tide, with the tide
    | 2022, 2'47, color, silent |
    - Anna Kipervaser

    I know, you're a seasonal beast
    Like the starfish that drift in with the tide
    With the tide
    So until your blood runs
    To meet the next full moon
    Your madness fits in nicely with my own
    With my own
    Your lunacy fits neatly with my own
    My very own
    - from Sea Song by Robert Wyatt

    Anna Kipervaser is a Ukrainian-born artist whose practice engages with a range of topics including human and animal bodies, ethnicity, religion, colonialism, and environmental conservation. Her engagement with these topics is informed by a commitment to formal experimentation, DIY and alternative processes, spanning disciplines including experimental and documentary moving image works in both 16mm film and digital video.

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    Tuesday
    Feb.13
    7PM
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    • Tuesday, Feb. 13th, 7PM
      Colgate University
      Hamilton
      NY



    Passages

    RPM: 10th Anniversary Screening Program One



    RPM (Revolutions per Minute) was founded in 2013. The exhibition RPM: Sound Art China, co-curated by Dajuin Yao and Wenhua Shi, featured 30 sound artists and was held at Colgate University and at Experimental Intermedia in NYC. The following year, the exhibition traveled to Shanghai and Hong Kong, and then expanded its scope to encompass a broader media art and experimental cinema landscape. In 2019, RPM relocated to Boston. Two touring programs celebrate the 10-year anniversary of the inaugural program at Colgate University. The first program, titled Passages, features works by Bill Brown, Janie Geiser, Ariana Gerstein, Laura Kraning, Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu, Bernd Lützeler, Sharon Mooney, Hiroya Sakurai, Kelly Sears, and Xiao Zhang. This program is organized by Benny Shaffer and Wenhua Shi.

    The annual festival features a series of ten screening programs along with other exhibitions that include audiovisual performance and installation works. RPM24 will screen 70 short pieces by artists and collectives from over fifteen countries. Each year, one or two programs are dedicated to pioneers in the field. Past festivals showcased the works of Saul Levine, Barbara Hammer, Luther Price, Peggy Ahwesh, and Janie Geiser. Last year a solo retrospective program featured Vincent Grenier’s lifelong cinematic practice at The Brattle Theatre. In 2023, RPM hosted a total of twenty screening programs and performances, as well as five touring programs.

    RPM24 will be held at UMass Boston, Goethe-Institut Boston, Boston City Hall, CAMLab (Harvard University), and the Brattle Theater..






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    XCTRY - Bill Brown
    2018, 6:18 mins, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    A throwing forth - Xiao Zhang
    2023, 6mins, China/USA, color, 16mm to HD , Sound

    The Stream (XII-II) - Hiroya Sakurai
    2022, 7 mins, Japan, Color, Sound

    Absent Objects - Janie Geiser
    2020, 7:41 mins, color, sound

    _galore (Digital Version) - Bernd Lützeler
    2019, 9mins, color, sound

    Phase II - Kelly Sears
    2022, 6:30 minutes, Color, Sound

    I'm sorry I'm late - Sharon Mooney
    2023, 7:30 mins, Color, Sound

    de-composition - Laura Kraning
    2023, 2:40 mins, color, HD, Sound

    In Littleness - Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu
    2022, 8:15 mins, color, 8mm to HD, Sound

    Traces with Elikem - Ariana Gerstein
    2018, 7 mins, B/W, Desktop Scanner & Digital Video, Sound

    Total: 70mins

    Post-screening discussion:
    Wenhua Shi & Lindsey Lodhie

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    XCTRY
    2018, 6:18 mins, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD
    By Bill Brown

    A pocket-sized travelogue about leaving one hometown and looking for the next one.

    Bill Brown has produced films on the United States–Mexico border, North Dakota missile silos, the Trans-Canada Highway, among other places. The films have been exhibited at numerous film festivals and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York.[4][5] He describes his films as postcards with a pretty picture but instead of words on the back, his films are narrated with voiceover[6][1]. Brown is also the author of a zine called Dream Whip[7] which currently has 15 issues, and the book Saugus to the Sea (ISBN 978-0968974407). In 2001 Brown received the Creative Capital Award in the Discipline of Moving Image.[8]

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    A throwing forth
    2023, 6mins, China/USA, color,
    16mm to HD , Sound
    By Xiao Zhang

    A time remnant inhabits a personal space with a secret, private, unspoken word of one's being. Sliding planes of window and time, throwing drifts of the inner and the outer self, the film seeks in the interval of memory for a transitory reunion with my family.

    Xiao Zhang is an artist-filmmaker from China living in Los Angeles. She received her BFA at Beijing Film Academy in 2020 and currently holds an MFA in Film/Video at CalArts. Her practice centers on personal poetics which derives from cross-generation memory and diaristic approaches. It continues by employing methods drawn from handcrafted celluloid film and expanded cinema. Her work often offers a complex fluctuation between material reality and subjective experience.

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    The Stream (XII-II)
    2022, 7 mins, Japan, Color, Sound
    By Hiroya Sakurai

    Human beings act on nature in order to keep their lives.
    From their activities, several streams are generated and landscapes are transformed.
    I focus on the beauty of transformation created through the relation between human activities and nature, and want to express the beauty as a kind of visual ballet.
    In this film, I shot a scene of burning of reeds fields.
    When the reeds fields are burned carbon dioxide is generated, but newly generated carbon dioxide is absorbed by the spring reeds sprouts in their process of growth. Whole processes are carbon neutralized. - HS

    Hiroya Sakurai
    Born in Yokohama, Japan.
    Professor, Seian University of Art and Design.
    Sakurai’s work can be found in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada and J.Paul Getty Trust.
    Sakurai was awarded at “35th Asolo Art Film Festival (2016)", Italy, "39th Tokyo Video Festival", "18th FILE 2017 ", São Paulo (2017) and "56th Ann Arbor Film Festival" (2018). Exhibitions include "4th Sydney Biennale (1982),"62nd Melbourne International Film Festival"(2013),"58th San Francisco International Film Festival" (2015) and "24th Rhode Island International Film Festival"(2020)

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    Absent Objects
    2020, 7:41 mins, color, sound
    By Janie Geiser

    Absent Objects Film by Janie Geiser
    Sound design: Janie Geiser
    Sound mix: Kari Rae Seekins
    Digital Mastering: Astra Price

    Three empty photo albums, vessels of lost time and memory beyond reach.

    Janie Geiser is a multidisciplinary artist whose practice includes performance, film, installation, and visual art. Geiser’s work is known for its recontextualization of abandoned images and objects, its embrace of artifice, and its investigation of memory, power, and loss. Geiser is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Doris Duke Artist Award recipient, and a Creative Capital awardee.
    “Geiser gives voice to the reaches of the unconscious, pointing to the abandoned splendor that exists prior to the rules of society and language.” (—Holly Willis, Res,2004).
    Geiser’s films have been screened at the National Gallery of Art, Microscope Gallery, the Whitney Museum, the Guggenheim Museum, MOMA, Pacific Film Archives, the Centre Pompidou, the Salzburg Museum, San Francisco MOMA, LACMA, the Sharjah Biennial, and NY Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, London International Film Festival, Oberhausen Film Festival, Curtas Vila do Conde, and Hong Kong International Film Festival.
    Geiser’s films are in the collections of MOMA, The NY Public Library’s Donnell Media Center, CalArts, and BAMPFA. Her film The Red Book is part of the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. The Academy of Motion Pictures Archive has selected her work for preservation, and The Fourth Watch (2000) was selected by Film Comment as one of the top ten experimental films of the past decade.

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    _galore (Digital Version)
    2019, 9mins, color, sound
    By Bernd Lützeler

    The streetscapes of contemporary Indian metros are largely dominated by products. The bazaar expands into all other parts of the city and claims a large percentage of the available public space. The vast majority of the local shops is lacking the facility of a shop window. Instead, their architecture can be described as a garage style, windowless, rectangular box, open to the front. Stepping into such a shop can be like entering a complete new world: Many of them are literally filled with products galore up to the ceiling. The product itself serves as the interior design. Every day hundreds of busses with thousands of shop owners and their family members come from the surrounding villages and small towns into the city. Especially during the rush hours the market gets overrun by an avalanche of customers who seem to enjoy their high-density shopping experience. Shopping galore. Products galore. Profits galore.

    Artist and filmmaker Bernd Lützeler lives and works between Berlin and Mumbai. In his works he explores techniques of moving image production and presentation in relation with their form and perception. Loops, found footage and jugaad (diy) technologies are an integral part of his films and expanded cinema works. His travels to Mumbai have a strong impact on his work that often looks into the aesthetics of popular Indian cinema and television within the urban context. His films have been shown at venues and festivals worldwide, including Centre Pompidou, Berlinale International Film Festival, Rotterdam, San Francisco Cinematheque, Views from the Avant-Garde and many more. Bernd is an active member of the artist-run analogue filmlab LaborBerlin.

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    Phase II
    2022, 6:30 minutes, Color, Sound
    By Kelly Sears

    In the near future, real estate developers deploy sonic weapons used at protests to clear neighborhoods for high-end high rises. On the front lines are sound medics that tend to those injured by the assaults. As they respond, one member of the team documents the incidents to create a future archive for other sonic activists.
    For Phase II, the filmmaker walked around areas of rapid development in her city and took thousands of photographs. This animated, speculative fiction/non-fiction archive maps out more aggressive eviction and deployment tactics to come.

    Kelly Sears creates hybrid speculative fiction and nonfiction animations. She animates appropriated source imagery that suggests an official process, order, or account – ranging from instructional guides to chronicles of specific histories. Through cutting up, collaging, and untethering the images from their intended purpose, she shapes alternate narratives by transforming the histories, behaviors, and ideologies embedded in these frames. Through these animations, we glean bits of history that are recognizable but unsteady.
    Her award-winning films have screened at Sundance, Slamdance, South by Southwest, American Film Institute, Los Angeles Film Festival, MoMA, The Hammer Museum, The Museum of Contemporary Art Houston, and Union Docs. Sears has had solo programs of her work at the Pacific Film Archives, Anthology Film Archives, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, The Portland Art Museum, and the San Francisco Cinematheque.

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    I'm sorry I'm late
    2023, 7:30 mins, Color, Sound
    By Sharon Mooney

    Psychological deteriorations caused by invisible labor and stress slowly build. What's left as her internal and external struggles to find solid ground?
    Moments taken from The Avengers that hint at disruption, mental dissolution, and violence slowly disintegrate to be replaced with another - another thought/another memory/another question. An ethereal soundscape with re-edited sound clips from Honey West gives voice to the tension of navigating the unnamed character's internal and external self.

    Sound design and mix by Rob Steel
    Re-Recording Mixing by Kevin Cagnolatti
    Music by Mike Puretz
    Dialog from Honey West and images from The Avengers manipulated and edited by Sharon Mooney

    Sharon Mooney I grew up in Richmond, Virginia. I earned my M.F.A. from The School of Visual Arts in Photo, Video and Related Media and my B.A from Xavier University in Electronic Media. As a filmmaker, I work in experimental, narrative and documentary portraiture all focused on investigating desire and the human condition. My short videos and installations have screened internationally in festivals and galleries.
    After working in various aspects of film and television, I settled into post-production. I am currently on the faculty in the School of Film and Television at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, CA. In graduate school, a professor called my sense of humor childish and that's true at least 2/3rds of the time.

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    de-composition
    2023, 2:40 mins, color, HD, Sound
    By Laura Kraning

    A textural macro collage of a rust belt landscape- scratched, splattered, dripping, cracking, and bursting to the surface. Photographed and meticulously edited over one year in Buffalo, NY, the reverberant tones of the New York Central rail line provide the rhythmic pulse to a rapid cascade of multi-hued material decay and metallic de-composition.

    Laura Kraning’s moving image work navigates landscape as a repository for memory, cultural mythology, and the technological sublime. Exploring absence and the fluidity of time, she evokes liminal spaces of neither past, nor present, but a landscape of the imagination. Laura’s work has screened widely at international film festivals, such as New York, Rotterdam, Edinburgh, San Francisco, Ann Arbor, Antimatter, Visions du Réel, and Festival du Nouveau Cinema, among others. Her work has received numerous awards, including the Film House Award for Visionary Filmmaking at the 2016 Athens International Film and Video Festival for her film Irradiant Field. Her recent film, Meridian Plain, was nominated for a Tiger Shorts Award at the 2017 International Film Festival Rotterdam and received the Jury Award for Short Film at the Rencontres Internationales Sciences & Cinémas Film Festival in Marseiiles, France.

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    In Littleness
    2022, 8:15 mins, color, 8mm to HD, Sound
    By Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu

    The film was shot on a regular 8mm camera and is presented in unslit form as 16mm, a screening format commonly referred to as double 8mm. When I first came into contact with this medium, I was deeply attracted by its miniature size. Eight millimeters is a very small space on which to store images. It reminds me of all kinds of things from childhood: ephemeral, wonderful, changeable. Recalling that as a child I spent most of my time with my nanny, I decided to zoom in on daily life, especially trivial household chores. At the same time, the particles and dust of the childhood world are magnified. During the filming process, I remembered a question asked by Stan Brakhage: When a film is projected, how many frames does an image need in order to make an impression on human vision? In In Littleness, we are asked to watch four images at a time. Each screen only lasts for a moment. The waves of oncoming impressions submerge the viewer in an open and chaotic world, in which a noisy childhood experience is faintly drawn. The memories included in the film are not just from my childhood, but also from childhood memories of people close to me. In the end, what In Littleness treasures is the texture of childhoods, overlapping and collective.

    Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu (b. 1982, Kaohsiung, Taiwan) is an interdisciplinary artist, filmmaker and writer whose work is grounded in literature and the conceptual avant-garde. Cherlyn’s creative activity often starts from a life event or curiosity concerning an anomaly in language or in the material world. It continues by employing methods drawn from both Eastern and Western practices and philosophies. Her working method at various times involves handcrafted material, mixed media, and experimental interchange between new and old technologies.

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    Traces with Elikem
    2018, 7 mins, B/W, Desktop Scanner & Digital Video, Sound
    By Ariana Gerstein

    This film documents traces that were performed and captured by scanner and monitor surfaces. Other surfaces include paper and film. Light reflects and passes through; layers slide past, and sometimes they meet, punctuated by vibrating, percussive sounds. This film documents traces that were performed and captured by scanner and monitor surfaces. Other surfaces include paper and film. Light reflects and passes through; layers slide past, and sometimes they meet, punctuated by vibrating, percussive sounds.

    Ariana Gerstein works in experimental and experimental documentary forms both on her own and in collaboration with others. Feature documentaries include collaborations with husband Monteith McCollum Hybrid and Milk in the Land. Her short experimental documentary “Alice Sees the Light” showed on the PBS series P.O.V. Gerstein’s independent films have been screened and awarded prizes at festivals internationally. She received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Cinema Department at the State University of New York at Binghamton.

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    Sunday
    Jan.28
    2PM
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    • Sunday, Jan. 28, 2PM, 2024
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge, MA


    We were given these instructions

    Kelly Sears


    New Year's First Screening featuring 10 Shorts by Kelly Sears

    Join us for an extraordinary cinematic experience as we kick off the new year with the first RPM24 screening of 2024!
    This event, co-hosted at The Brattle Theatre in the heart of Cambridge, Massachusetts, will showcase the unconventional works of experimental animator Kelly Sears.

    Kelly Sears' collection of 10 shorts, spanning from 2007 to 2023, offers a mesmerizing journey through time and imagination. Notably, her most recent creation, "The Last Season," is set to premiere at the Sundance Film Festival 2024.

    Sears, known for her idiosyncratic approach to animation, skillfully reinterprets American archetypes and institutions, providing a fresh perspective on our social and political legacy.

    Post Screening Q&A Kelly Sears & Shira Segal




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    Maximum Umbra
    (RT 3:09, 2022)

    The Drift
    (RT 8:10, 2007)

    Voice on the Line 
    (RT 6:45, 2009)

    The Body Besieged
    (RT 4:40, 2009)

    Once It Started It Could Not End Otherwise
    (RT 7:30, 2011)

    The Rancher
    (RT 7:09, 2012)

    Pattern for Survival
    (RT 6:27, 2015)

    Applied Pressure
    (RT 6:22, 2018)

    Phase II
    (RT 6:30, 2022)

    The Lost Season
    (RT 6:09, 2023)

    total: 63mins

    Further More: Sleater-Kenny - High in the Grass


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    Kelly Sears is more than an animator; she is a visionary who employs animation as a critical practice. Through cutting, collaging, and merging animated photographic and film documents with speculative storytelling, Sears creates films that challenge and expand our understanding of cultural narratives. Her work becomes a canvas where history converges with myth, resulting in uncanny and fantastical tales.

    Sears' award-winning films have graced esteemed festivals worldwide, including Sundance, South by Southwest, and the American Film Institute. Her shorts have been showcased at renowned institutions such as the Pacific Film Archives in Berkeley and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Awards from festivals like Ann Arbor, Black Maria, Chicago Underground, and Oak Cliff underscore the impact of Sears' unique cinematic vision.

    A graduate of Hampshire College and the University of California, San Diego, Kelly Sears has left an indelible mark on experimental animation. Her journey includes teaching at esteemed institutions such as Pitzer College, Scripps College, Rice University, and the University of Houston. Currently serving as the Associate Faculty Director for Undergraduate Studio Arts in Cinema Studies and Moving Image Arts at the University of Colorado, Sears continues to inspire and shape the next generation of filmmakers.

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    Maximum Umbra
    (RT 3:09, 2022)

    Maximum Umbra is an alternate account of the solar eclipse in 2017. Images and sounds recorded at this event conjure an unexpected celestial disaster.

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    The Drift
    (RT 8:10, 2007)

    A mysterious disappearance on a 1960s space journey launches the counter-culture revolution, the government blocks contraband radio broadcasts, and American fervor for conquering space finally goes too far.

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    Voice on the Line 
    (RT 6:45, 2009)

    Figures from archived industrial films from the 1950s are recast in a large-scale speculative operation, reflecting on troubled relationships between the areas of national security, civil liberties, and communication corporations. The surveillance operation in this film veers off course, turning the operation into an exploration of liberation.

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    The Body Besieged
    (RT 4:40, 2009)

    Animated instructional photographs from yoga and exercise books reveal bewitched and frenzied bodies and maneuvers. Exercising women move through a possessed psychic space that distorts and mirrors some of our daily routines. Their bodies point to haunted forces may lay behind a fevered sense of unwellness.

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    Once It Started It Could Not End Otherwise
    (RT 7:30, 2011)

    Created in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, animated figures from discarded mid- 1970s high school yearbooks are situated in recently photographed backgrounds taken at a local high school. In this minimalist horror story, a malevolent force seeps into the high school walls, and the student body breaks down one extra-curricular activity at a time.

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    The Rancher (RT 7:09, 2012)
    (RT 7:09, 2012)

    A series of terrible dreams unhinge a man in power. The Rancher is a parafictional newsreel film featuring an anonymous president during wartime. The reworked footage, sampled from newsreels about Lyndon Baines Johnson, presents a more fraught portrait of the daily life of this archetypical president. As he escalates military involvement, the president is plagued by terrible dreams that result in the unraveling of public opinion about the war. The narrative of The Rancher largely parallels LBJ’s administration as well as ones from more recent history.

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    Pattern for Survival
    (RT 6:27, 2015)

    Pattern for Survival channels the frenetic energy and aggression of security and preparedness. Speculative threats are rendered as routine directives. As you read the rest of this manual, keep in mind the need for a survival strategy. There are a lot of rapid image changes in this film, please let the file load before watching.

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    Applied Pressure
    (RT 6:22, 2018)

    Sequential images sourced from dozens of massage books are altered and reordered to shift the emphasis from the actions on the body to the reception of the touch. This rising anxiety and ultimate realization that the subjects are in an abusive situation occurs as multiple bodies emerge, stuttering and struggling. The sound design is an extension of the psychic space of the bodies in the frame, with relaxing water sounds transitioning into rushing currents. This animation channels recent public conversations and accusations surrounding bodies, massage, and trauma. The body remembers. Aches may linger.

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    Phase II
    (RT 6:30, 2022)

    In the near future, real estate developers deploy sonic weapons used at protests to clear neighborhoods for high-end high rises. On the front lines are sound medics that tend to those injured by the assaults. As they respond, one team member documents the incidents to create a future archive for other sonic activists.

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    The Lost Season (RT 6:09, 2023)
    (RT 6:09, 2023)

    As the world experiences its final winter, desperate measures to hold onto the season awaken a radical labor consciousness.

    Post Screening Q&A
    Kelly Sears & Shira Segal

    Dr. Shira Segal has taught a wide range of film courses and is an active researcher in autobiographical cinema across avant-garde and documentary cinema. She received her PhD in Film and Media Studies from Indiana University’s Dept. of Communication and Culture, where her dissertation Home Movies and Home Birth: The Avant-garde Childbirth Film and Pregnancy in New Media provides an aesthetic and cultural history of alternative film and media practices surrounding the maternal body over the past fifty years. This project includes interviews with filmmakers and original archival research with the James Stanley Brakhage Collection, housed by the Archives at the University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries. For her MA in Cultural Memory from the University of London’s Institute of Romance Studies, Segal’s thesis examines the transmission of private and public memory in photography and experimental film; selections of this thesis on Hollis Frampton’s film (nostalgia) have been published by the University of Texas at Austin’s Text, Practice and Performancejournal. Segal is also an undergraduate alumni from the University of Colorado’s Film Studies Program. Research interests include The Embodied Camera: Visual Strategies of the Self in Avant-garde Cinema. Her book chapter “Stories of the Self in Cinema: Autobiography and the Documentary Image” appears in American Creative Nonfiction (Salem Press, 2015). Further publications include articles in MP: An Online Feminist Journal, Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, and Wig: Journal of Experimental Scholarship. She has given public lectures on Stan Brakhage and First Person Cinema at Ohio State University and the University of Washington.

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    Navigating the Creative Cosmos:
    Kelly Sears & Aiah Zhang

    Artistic beginning and inspiration

    Aiah(A): To start with, I guess you might have a lot of questions already before about why collage, why film, why animation?

    Kelly Sears(KS): Great question. Thank you. I got involved in filmmaking when I was in college, at Hampshire College. And their film curriculum was so expansive and skewed into works that really embraced an individual aesthetic. And so early on, when I was exposed to film, it was really being an opportunity to be exposed to how individuals created their own vision, that it was not just the lens, but it was layering images, collaging images, making just very personal images. And at college, I started working with equipment like the optical printer and the animation stand. And it really developed as a way to, how do I want to build what each frame looks like in a film. And it was a very hands on approach to it. And when I went to graduate school, I really dug more into just building my frames and figuring out what that meant. I worked very much with analog equipment in college, but when I went to grad school, I didn't have the same access to all those different film apparatus. And I started working digitally. So I was just taking photos with DSLRs. They had after effects on the computer. So I taught myself really basic after effects. And with my brain, I was just starting to think about how I could use after effects, like an optical printer or an animation stand. And that was my way into kind of like building this very vertical frame across all the works. And so collage, for me, is more than just a visual practice. It really just becomes a way of moving through the world. It becomes part of my artistic practice or developing a visual style. And I feel like I cook that way, too. I'll look at three different recipes and be like, oh, that part sounds good here, and this part sounds good here. And it's a way of trying to bring together very disparate elements, but also finding a harmony in how they come together.


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    A: Well, speak of the school times, how was the film scene then? How is the atmosphere there?

    KS: Right. I don't want to date myself, but undergrad was definitely before we lived on the Internet. You really had to work to see things. And so whenever a visiting artist would come, whenever there be some sort of extra screening, I just knew it was a way to access something I wouldn't have any way of seeing. And I think for me, there was so many forms of collage that I saw in undergrad, and it could just be the way a film was structured, or splice or taping blades of grass and moth wings onto a frame, or it could be a story that was both historical but also fictional at the same time. And I think just really being interested in seeing so many kinds of works, they all kind of started to tie together after that. In grad school, I went to not necessarily a film program, but I went to a visual arts program. And that was a whole new opening, because it wasn't just this time based practice I was situated in. It was people who were sculptors. It was people who were photographers. It was people who were doing all kinds of different performance, all these different kinds of practices. And it became a way to maybe think through a film practice in different dimensions when I started thinking a lot about just kind of sculptural space in the frame when I was collaging together. Now I feel like we're in this era right now where everything is just so much more. You're able to be aware of other practitioners who are asking maybe similar questions or making some kind of films that are exciting to you. That aren't coming through exactly where you are, but through, I think, the proliferation of film festivals, I feel like that is so much more commonplace than it was when I was growing up, having opportunities to see me work. And with collage, there's right now, I think this is kind of very interesting moment where this curator, who is the kind of creative director of the Ottawa International Animation Festival, just put together a big collage animation retrospective in Slovenia and has written a book called earmarked for collision that he invited myself and many other collage animators just to talk about. Our practice in there. And things like that becomes a catalyst for putting people in conversation together is a way to really think about how different people are. Asking questions through a form that in some ways originates in just something so simple and cutting something out and moving it to a new place.



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    A: Yeah, I totally feel the vibes there back then. It's more digital nowadays, but back then I would say you need to move your body and physically move to the place to find out and search for new inspirations and new works. And I can see the progress of the collage and animation and film that you just accumulate to each other and then have this amazing breakthroughs nowadays.

    KS: And it's also after going through COVID, right, when everything was just like, yes, you actually had an access to so many things, all these online screenings, but it's wonderful to be back when you get to go to a place. I'm so excited to come to Boston. And it's so much about having this very singular experience about how does this program of films work and what kind of conversations can grow out.

    A: There are various things on Internet, but you're coming out and physically doing things like searching for the things and seeing touching and having all of the interactions. Truly amazing. And also, speak of the background, academic background. And now you're a mentor at the University of Colorado. And I'm just wondering how was the teaching influenced your work and do your students inspired new ideas to you?

    KS: That's a great question. I've been at Colorado for almost ten years now, and I had done teaching before that and I think right now I'm in a place where I try to bring as much of my creative brain to my students. I don't want to present that there's just one way to think through something, but I like to kind of open up my brain and talk about how I build connections. When I'm really in my studio and really excited about the work, all of that energy comes through me to my students. And I teach a combination of core production classes, but also electives. So, like, I'll teach the introduction to moving image or the BFA capstone class, but I have electives where I get to teach experimental digital animation or experimental narrative. And that's the place where know the things that I'm really ingesting and thinking about and experimenting with comes through into the classroom, into these bigger questions that we ask. And I really always try to build a question around some sort of thing we're going to explore through animation, some readings we're doing, some screenings we're doing, and try to build these little clusters about how we think through producing an image or a landscape or a body and what we want any of those to contain going forward. In terms of my students being inspiring, there's so many I'm in great connection with, and there's some students who come back to visit their parents in this area, and they'll come over for a coffee. There's one student who is a former student in my animation class, Dana Crawford, who ran with collage animation, and she made the most incredible collage animation music video. So I actually bring her as a guest to my mental digital animation class. And the students just think it's so wild. The videos is great, and they're so inspired. Like, oh, you took this class and then you made this video. And so it's a really great way to think about not me and that class is once one moment in time, but how that can evolve in time. And so I'm teaching that class next semester, and I will definitely be inviting Dana Crawford back to present her work.

    A: Sounds amazing, because in the portfolio, I saw the film study videos from 2015 to 2019. As I can assess those videos that you uploaded to the website, it was a quite raw and newness and that kind of complexity inside of the video, it is such a fresh air for me. And I wonder if you have a key advice for the aspiring new students that is following you or following the animation or experimental film process.


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    KS: I think when I work with students, especially over multiple years, I'm teaching our first production class now, and I'm also teaching our BFA capstone class. And I'm really interested in students finding their own individual filmmaking form, their own individual questions that they're asking. And kind of when you see a piece, you can see them in it. And I really try to encourage them to find a practice that really comes from them. And at the end of my moving Image foundations class this semester, it was so great because I could see, Ori, that film is such an ori film. Or, hey, Finn, that is, know all these things, like the way you work with camera, the way your frame looks, or the way you work with questions about genders and home movies and memoirs. I see that in your work. And so I really try to create a space where students can realize what their own vision is. And especially when they're coming in new, their exposure has been kind of like, what are your kind of commodity media products, like what's on Netflix, and where things actually feel really homogeneous in a lot of ways, in terms of storytelling, in terms of aesthetics. And so I think in all my classes, I really want them to understand that there's no one way that their work needs to look. And for them to really ask questions like, well, what does my work need to look like? And what is really inspiring to me to create a practice that's going to always be playful and curious and inquisitive, and having me seek more and dig.

    Thematic Evolution and Societal Commentary

    A: Looking through your work, I think the theme or the style of your work is really a kaleidoscope. Are there any unique rituals or serendipitous moments that you have behind the creative process? For example, in the tropical depression, the Miss Universe contest, and then the hurricane. How are those coming together?


    KS: That's a great question as well. And I think that's kind of one of the collage impulses is not just how the frame is built, but some of the histories or stories that are going into the frame and the film that you referenced. Tropical depression. I was living on the island of Galveston, and I was at an artist residency called the Galveston Artist residency. And there was a final show for the residency. And while I was living in Texas, and I'd moved there before for a fellowship called the Corps program at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. At that point, I was invited to make a film from the Texas archive of the moving image for a show at the contemporary art museum. And I had made a film called the Rancher with materials of Johnson, who I just looked through the archive and just saw three newsreels and took those and made kind of like an alternate subconscious, nightmare dream reel of an unnamed president. And then I made that while I was living in Galveston. But then for the show in Galveston, I thought I'd like to work with other images of Texas. And so I went back to the Texas archive of the moving image. And it's always know, I think in that body of work I was looking for, I'm like, what film's going to grab my attention? And how can I recast the figure in know? And I think there's, like, a long trend of me recasting figures to perform other narratives in my work. And I came across a newsreel from the pageant of pulchritude, which is an earlier name for the Miss Universe contest that used to be held in Galveston. And I just found this image of the woman who won it, who was 17 years old, and she had taken a boat over from Belgium. And it was like this moment of she wins this huge contest, but she doesn't speak English. She's been on a boat for so long, and she's kind of really disoriented and exhausted. And I felt like there was something really vulnerable about that. And the artist residency that I was doing came about as a response to Hurricane Ike, which had, like, wiped out a ton of the island. And, like, Galveston, history of hurricanes, and one of the most deadly hurricanes in American history happened in Galveston, like, 1899. And this residency, after disasters, there's always, in some form, some predatory environment of people coming in and profiting off of a place that's been destroyed that's very vulnerable. And so I started thinking about this layers of Galveston and thinking about this early Miss Universe pageant and this more recent hurricane kind of being these layers of vulnerability and precariousness that had happened there. And so I worked with this newsreel and then found imagery of Hurricane Ike coming in and kind of thinking about this as building those two together and this kind of abstract portrait that's like part newsreel but maybe part landscape as.



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    A: I think it's a new experience but a new way to attract people to look back into the histories. And that's really amazing for me. And then also in the pattern for survival or buddy besieged and maybe the applied pleasure there is a captivating interplay between, for example, motion and stillness or like rhythmic repetition or sometimes chaotic. How do you strike that balance? And is there any underlying messages that if there is any. Can you expose those kind of processes behind the choices that you have?

    KS: Yeah. So that was the body besieged pattern for survival and applied pressure. I love talking about time as something that you get to build in each piece. And what is a rhythm of time that you're building? And what pulse does it have? Is the time space one that's like a fluttering pulse that's produced from anxiety or fear? Is it something that is a little more watchful and waiting? And I think just in terms of thinking about how many frames you hold in a cycle, you can create these rhythms in cycles that you can hopefully connect with the people who are watching the film. And I think so much about watching something that moves through space and time is about a somatic connection. And where can I, as I'm animating a person who's watching it or even myself, like I have a heartbeat, I have a heart rate. And it's not always the same thing. So those three works have different intentions, I believe, where body besieged is created from exercise books and wellness books. And I was thinking about what if there was a darker force behind the wellness? And the way that I. And it came about this way is that it was one of the earliest kind of Muybridge-esque animations I made where these workout books, they're instructional books right. And they have sequential imagery in them to show you how to do a move. And I scanned in all these sequential images and then just animated them. And they didn't have as many representative gestures in the sequence. So when I animated them, I thought about, well, what does it look like when the body's moving using these four frames that I'm looping? And I thought, oh, they look possessed. And so I went about to think about these kind of. And they all have smiles on their face, every frame. And so it's like, kind of these frenetic, overly positive images that red is like these women's bodies that have been possessed by this wellness drive. And so that was like, how can I work with animation to have them kind of carry that feeling? And I'll contrast that with a piece applied pressure, which also uses sequential images, but this time from body workbooks, i n massage books, and that film kind of took a while to come about. And whenever, if I'm out in a used bookstore or a thrift store or a yard sale and I look through books, I love a sequential image book because I'm like, there's an animation in there somewhere. And I remember finding a massage book and purchasing it and then having it be on the bookshelf in my studio, but it wasn't ready for it to be activated. And then during the wave of accusations that were coming against Harvey Weinstein about women, that he asked to come to his hotel room and then under the guise of massage, would sexually assault them. All of a sudden, I thought, oh, this book has a new lens on it. And thinking about massage not as something that's therapeutic, but something that can be traumatic. And not long after that, all the kind of assault allegations against Larry Nasser, the US gymnast team, came about, too. And so it was a way of not only just talking about those two moments, but kind of thinking about how a larger cultural discourse of sexual assault was playing out, and also women's experiences of sexual assault, where it's not always clear, it can kind of be a slow move across something that seems innocent to something that's assault. And I think a lot of women are, like, in that space, don't know what's really happening and aren't sure what's happening until it's already happened. And so with that, I was like, I wanted to bring that all out and applied pressure and working very much with how the hands on the women's bodies can go into a space that reads as innocuous, but then starts to veer into a gray zone into this touch feels dangerous. And so it was all about finding specific gestures of hands on women's bodies holding too long and really sculpting the time of. What does that space before an assault actually happens feel like? And how does time feel like in that moment?


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    A: Truly, the implication in the movies, it just make me think further, but at the same time, the kinesthetic resonance, in a way, when the repetition happens, it’s physical connections for me to have. And I don't know if you have the same experience producing it, I believe you might have to watch it or staring at it hundreds of times before you finish the work. And how was the experience for you?

    KS: It's funny. Specifically, with applied pressure, I never had this feeling before. But when I was animating, I could feel myself, like, digging my feet into the ground. And I was just aware of my feet and toes just, like, tensing, making it. And for me, I thought that that was really successful because I'm like, this piece is about your body holding on to anxiety and trauma, and my body is having a physical response to watching this. And for me, I thought that was very successful to me. But I also think about when I'm watching films, when do I feel like I get taken along with them? And sometimes it just could be like, shots could be a couple of frames off, and I'm like, that's just not taking me. And I think it's about how do I sync up what's happening in the film with my body? So I feel something with hopes that when another body is watching it, they can feel something in there. And it's so much experimentation because there's so many things I'll try out. And I'm like, that's just falling. I don't respond to that. I don't react to that. And then I'll change things just a little bit. There's always, like, drafts and drafts and drafts and drafts of shots. I do put something together and watch it. No, that's not happening quite yet. And kind of really just massage things to a point where I'm like, oh, actually, something in there is registering with me. There's some sort of kinetic energy in the frame that is like doing something, responding to something, or I'm responding to it, and I feel a connection with it.

    A: Is the applied pleasure the first time for you to have those kind of connections, I mean, physical connections, with the work that you had?

    KS: No. Maybe as pointed as a physical one. And I think there's so many different time periods or time measures that I respond to. And I feel like earlier in my film, there's a film called. I would say maybe once it started, it could not end otherwise, in the drip, those two films are really slow, except for towards the end of once it started, it's not slow, but for a while, it was really connecting with slowness at the time and really being against things that were moving fast. I wanted things almost to hardly move as a way of. So in the drift, it was just like, I remember getting into collage animation, and it was kind of early times, like, looking around at works that other people made. And so a very obvious place to look in terms of someone who's worked with collage animation is Terry Gilliam and his work with Monty Python. And I was watching it, and I'm like, this is too fast, and it's too obviously don't. It feels like that's not what I want this to feel like. And then I was like, well, what happens if I make it slow? And I said, what happens if I make it slower? And what happens if I even make it slower? And so the idea of a low decibel and just slow movements really was interesting to me at that point, in terms of a way, I think there's. Even though I'm talking about pulses and beats, I also feel like I have a low frequency that's just like, where I'm tuned into kind of like a drone. And then I thought about working with slowness again in the film. Once it started, it could not end otherwise. That featured cutouts from high school yearbooks. But the bodies moved so slow. But I animated these textures that I embedded into the walls of the high school. That actually moved quite fast. And then that piece I was really interested in this push and pull between something moving so slow and then something moving fast at the same time and having almost this visual arrhythmia in the frame.


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    A: Well, I think you're so successful in the techniques of doing that because I was watching. Once it started, it could never end otherwise. I totally don't know what happened in this background, but I can feel my heartbeat start to beating up a little bit and it just get to an end. And I was like, what happened? I'm so drawn into the story.

    KS: Thank you. Yeah, I had made a film before that called voice in the line. And afterwards I was like, I told the audience exactly where to go in that film. And so on the next one, I was like, I actually want not to tell the audience what happened, but for them to project or imagine, have their own version of what happened. Because in some ways, that's more terrifying than me.Naming something. Right. Like the unseen, the unnamed, the unknown. There's so much more potential for that to be so outrageously terrifying than once something is brought into the light a little bit.

    A: I realize your films frequently explore the societal transformation and speculative futures. But with the time goes on, I do feel like it's a personal thing. But in more recent works, the topic and theme shift a bit to personal territory rather than the purely imaginative, the cosmic topic, the astronauts and the far away things, or like the mass political things. And whether it's the COVID that high in the grass that we're going to talk in the coming questions and then the gentrification phase two, reflecting on those careers. In your career progress and how do you perceive the evolution that happened in your career over the time?

    KS: That's very observant because it's actually something I only put into perspective recently. And, yeah, you're right. I was like writing a grant and I had to write about all of my work together. And all of a sudden I realized it started out here and it's just like more and more coming know, like, you think about these larger kind of ideas of American iconography and progress that got more and more specific. And I think when I lived in Texas, I made. Once it started where I photographed a local high school, I made this piece called the Rancher about a Texas president. Like, as we had recently had another Texas president. And reflecting on kind of like that place and that connection to power and then living on Galveston, making work about Galveston and then moving into works like applied pressure, where actually we're talking about a. Like, my body can relate to that film for sure. And then moving into work that grew out of the pandemic with the Sleater-Kinney music video. And then phase two, which was like a piece that took a while to come around because it was such a shift of not working against a narrative that's contained in a found image that I'm making perform in a different way. And I started thinking about landscapes that my body is moving through and the ways that. How my body's moving through a landscape and how I'm seeing kind of this. Like Denver has, like many other American cities, right? Like these huge high rises that are going up at the same time as having a housing crisis. There's more housing being built every day, and yet there's like a housing crisis here. And I think multi residential units make so much sense, but yet it's not about addressing we need more housing. It's really about a lot of profit that's brought in and also addressing who do we want to move here to live in these buildings. And so I started that piece during COVID and I was just like, leaving the house, just like put a mask on and take photos, like taking walks. And I was like, I have to get out of the house. I'm just in the house all the time. And so I started that really in the moment when you would still just mask up out in public, even if you're 20ft from people. And then it was a way for me to put myself out in the world and just to kind of like, have a space to, like, think about something creatively instead of catastrophically, just like watching Covid numbers and. And it took me a while to figure out how to make that piece, but after I made it, I was like, right. In a way, I think the maybe anxieties or dread in the work have gotten much more like personal as opposed to general. And so it became a way of, what spaces can I move through and using?


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    When I've worked with bodies in the frames, I always think about recasting them and having them perform in different ways, like the astronauts in the drift, like telephone operators in voice in the line, like the high school students. And once it started, but then I thought, what if landscapes can perform differently? And what if landscapes can be recast? And so that finally, when I started thinking about that, like, oh, I see a whole other way of telling stories about places that I'm in, and there's images of contemporary landscapes, and I'll go someplace over weeks and weeks and weeks in multiple trips and film, and then think about, like, well, what stories are actually here and what can I graft onto them?
    And building a new genre that's kind of a science nonfiction, where we recognize these places and we understand our relationship to them, and yet we can also put them in these kind of more fantastic frameworks and also see that world at the same time.

    A: You said it's very personal things because it happened around you, too. I think it’s both personal and general in a way, for me. And then, like you said, there is some of the commentary that you put in the film that you made, and how do you blend the artistry with commentary? How do you manage to make your message resonate while retaining the film's artistic integrity?

    KS: Oh, gosh. Well, I hope it resonates. I mean, that's always my intention. But I enjoy writing, even though it's not the first way. I don't know if I'm a good writer, but it becomes a way of telling a story. And I think about who's narrating and what versions. How can they create a world? And I hope subtly, you kind of see these other plays of power in there, and how can that be embedded in the collage? So much of phase two, with all the housing is about this rapid vertical accumulation. So how can that idea both be in the story but also be in the visuals of the film as well. And sometimes some of the ways that something is made, like having a voice over, having this observational photography lens on there, evokes bits of documentary, but at the same time, I want to introduce some more poetics and more, taking some of those documentary impulses and putting them into this poetic, speculative wash to move through the work.

    A: And as we briefly touched the point, there are a lot of advancement in technology these days, whether it's the media production, or in other ways, AI these days are skyrocketing into the topic ranking. And are you facing any challenges with the advancement of technology when it comes to the filmmaking and production process?

    KS: Feel like in some ways, it makes me want to go scrappier, even in the work. It makes me want to make work that's less cohesive, that's less smooth. And I feel like I've always had a lo-fi filmmaking practice anyway, but it makes me want to show the edges more, and it makes me want to get more personal because, yeah, you could type in, I've seen people make AI that's reminiscent about different artists work, and it's also smooth. And with collage, I love. Just like, even in very subtle ways, you're aware that something is cut out and put in a different place, at least when I'm making it, where you see these images made by AI and it just feels like it's all generated homogeneously. And for me, it's like the tension between putting something in a place it doesn't belong and it not feeling like a diegetic space that that is pleasurable to me. And so if anything, it makes me want to get scrappier and have more edges and have more seams in my work.


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    A: that's unexpected. It’s interesting that pushed you towards more to a more original tools. And recently I saw The lost season, nominated again in the Sundance 2024, Congratulation! And other than the Sundance, you're nominated or screening your films in a lot of film festivals and exhibitions, and how do you perceive the audience engagement with your work, any reactions or interpretations that is memorable or stood out at that time?

    KS:Yeah. Sometimes for me, I think there's a lot of. When I mentioned edges and seams, I think there's edges and seams in all the stories, too, where part of you is like, I recognize this history. And also the story went in these impossible ways, but made me think about new ways of seeing that history or that image that I already had an association with and maybe opening up other ways of seeing that and opening up other ways of looking at history. And sometimes after I screened the drift a long time ago, someone asked me if they'd ever found those astronauts out in space. And so that's this thing where I'm like, oh, the intention is never to fool anyone. But the fact that it became such a lullaby to you that this fantastic maybe astronauts did choose to flood off into space. Or questions about what happened with those recordings from the telephone operators, from voice in the line, it's like, oh, gosh, these are such lo-fi stories. And yet they have this sincerity, I think, that other people pick up on. And I think most recently, I was doing a class visit and a student was talking about phase two, and it was just like they were commenting that it felt like such a story they saw everywhere around them. And yet it also was just the fictional interventions felt so out there, yet also so possible. And I think there's a lot of times I lean into a genre like science fiction or horror because I think just what happens around us in this world is horrifying in these ways, but it's so quiet in its horror. And I mean, sometimes, obviously, it's not quiet at all, but some sort of day to day, more quotidian ways that history unfolds, that working a little bit with these genres is a way to hold a magnifying glass to that.

    A: I totally agree with the part. I do feel like because the news is disease and unexpected happening around us is getting more and more frequent at a point, I feel a little bit numb about the new thing happening around me. How do you think the audience's interpretation of your work have evolved in a way, whether it's because of the COVID or the thing happening around us is so radical these days. And do you think those evolution happened to the audience interpretations too?

    KS:I think that's a good question, but I think it also is about as work becomes much more like localized, it being about space missions, it's being about housing being built for profits. That's actually not always helping the people who need housing. I think the issues are becoming a lot more like ones people can relate to. And the lost seasons about Earth's final winter and kind of a last ditch effort to hold on to. It ends up becoming a huge failure. And I think that there are these ideas about housing insecurity, about climate collapse that are so close in, just getting closer to so many people, that I think some of the work touch is about a life that's more recognizable to many of the viewers.


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    A: Just shift gears to a little bit brighter one. And for example, the projects like the drift, Jupiter, Elysis, or in those things you collaborated with, Anthony Kan, I would call it cosmic voice because it's all related to that topic and the voice on the line and the drift with know, like, I think collaboration has been a key for you and how do you approach these partnerships?

    Since we are already talking about the high in the grass too, that's a really interesting shift for me to see And I do feel like it is such a unique one that you had based on the environmental or the situational context. how did you transition from a horror vibe to an ecstatic one? Was it like weaving a narrative at a carnival?

    KS: , that's a great question. And I feel like it's interesting because Adam Wade did the sound design on some earlier works and for the last season we collaborated again and it was like a really great collaboration and I think we're going to keep working on that. But a lot of it was, I feel like my more recent interesting collaboration was like, I want to connect with people more while I'm creating as opposed to sitting home and writing and animating for a year. And I had this fantastic opportunity to change a little bit of production when the band Sleater-Kinney asked me to make a video for their song high in the grass.

    And I had just such a fast turnaround on that where it just had to be like, here's the idea and can we have the video in three weeks? And as someone who can take a year to make a film, it was like really thinking about how I could make a. I wanted to work with bodies, especially in COVID. There was so much attention to the body, and it was in a moment where everyone had just gotten and. But also it was something about, I knew I wanted to shoot this and I thought that would be really exciting to do. And another collaborator that I work with is a filmmaker named Laura Conway, and this is our first collaboration, and she was the cinematographer and the producer for the video. And it was great to like, yeah, let's bring in this choreographer. Yeah, here's all the dancers we can bring in. And have someone who's really good at that stuff in there. And it was just like, the video itself is about something that seemed horrific, that then you realize this new, radical form of healing and coming together at this moment and putting on this wild production and having one day to shoot that and being really safe with everyone, having a lot of conversations about consent, because people were unmasked there and was just like, do you feel safe unmasking? It's fine if you don't feel safe unmasking. Yes, I feel unsafe unmasking. Great. We'll all be masked and we'll all be 12ft from you. Does that feel safe for you? Yes, that feels safe for me. And it was just, like, wild to have all these people come together and then not sleeping for two weeks and animating it. But it made me realize that was so fun to work that way and to have feedback from people. I had Laura cut to the video and it just had to be done really fast. And it was a way of, like, I think one way we can connect while we're making work is like showing the work with people, but it was really inspiring to connect with people in the production of the work there. And so there's going to be some future work between Laura and I going forward. And actually, ideas from that Sleater-Kenny video are going to be coming into.


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    A: Since we are already talking about the high in the grass too, that's a really interesting shift for me to see And I do feel like it is such a unique one that you had based on the environmental or the situational context. how did you transition from a horror vibe to an ecstatic one? Was it like weaving a narrative at a carnival?

    KS: We had very little time, and it was a time where I was like, I have to think of a new way to make stuff. And then it was ecstatic to be with people and create with people. It felt so wild just to get everyone together and have them move. And I was working with the choreographer and what do we want bodies to do? And we just went to the dance studio on campus. She was a grad student at CU Boulder, and everyone in the video is affiliated with CU Boulder. And just like us moving around and how does it tell a story and how does know? It was something that was like one of these great things where it's like there's not much time and we got to wing it, make something. What can we pull out in a really short amount of time? And how much coffee can I have when I make it.

    A: I believe they must listen to the songs first and then choreograph in their own ways and then to film it later. How was their reaction to this project?

    KS: They thought it was great because a lot of them were Sleater-Kinny video, but it was a know Laura Conway, who shot and produced it. And then Maddie, who was the know, knew everyone there and was friends with everyone. So it had this kind of really friendly energy on the Maddie. I gave Maddie the song, and we just talked about the idea of new forms of care. And so Maddie made these dances up that were based on CPR maneuvers and checking pulses. And it was just like a way for these bodies and these bodies in a field to connect. And I always like to mediate bodies in some ways and play with different textures. And it was at the end of the semester, and I was also teaching the moving Image foundations class. And we were doing a hand painted film workshop one day, and I was like, oh, my gosh, I have to make this video. And so I set everyone up, and then I was just on a different table, like painting all this clear 16 millimeter and then transferring it so I could use something to layer into the bodies that were in the video. And so in some ways, it feels so different, but there's different ways of like, well, how can I interrupt or have the body express something like, be less figurative? And so that was one way to kind of bring some of the ways I've traditionally worked with bodies or have made animations into this film.

    A: do you feel like you would put more of dancers or those live performances into your work in the future?

    KS: I do hope. I've always wanted to make a film, and I'm working on it now that at some point has a choreographed dance scene in the middle of it. So that was like, yeah, I know some amazing dancers now and choreographers. This could be great.


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    A: Looking forward to that. And then there comes a question after that. If you could collaborate with any artist, past or present, who would it be and what kind of project would you envision?

    KS: my goodness. It would be a collage film with John Stezaker and Chris Marker. It would another time a science fiction story that I'd collaborate on the story with, with Chris Marker and with John Stezaker make, you know, all the different kind of bodies out of different kind of photos that we recognize, but into these new forms.

    A: Amazing. Maybe that could happen in the future with the technology advancement we have. Is there any new techniques? I know you already mentioned you went for more scrappier or more retro ways. But I just want to ask, is there any part technology or themes that excites you or that you want to explore in the future projects?

    KS:Well, I don't know if it's new technology, but there's just, like, different ways, different image architectures that I'm thinking about right now and kind of revisiting moments in past videos and thinking about how to expand on them. And I think that's something that I tell my students a lot, is like, if there's something that was exciting that you did, take that and build it up more. And so there's, like, moments from past videos I would love for there to be. In this bigger film, I'm working on a choreographed scene where it's a scene that starts off with this practice of body swapping, of people taking off, like, limbs and giving them to each other, and it turning into a choreographed big dance party. But also in films like Jupiter Elisius, I think about having this character who is collaged in with technology and having her real body interact with collage elements and pushing buttons and working on there's this kind of missile control sensor that I see her at that she's hitting different buttons. And in that film, it was like a very early version of collaging human body with collage architecture in the frame. Like, kind of almost it being an after the fact set that that person was situated in. And I'm interested in exploring filming people and putting them in collage sets that I design and having them interact with them and also just really expanding visual languages. I feel like some films have a very consistent tone across them and building bigger works that really shift in terms of different aesthetics throughout.

    A: because in one of the previous, earlier works that I see, there is a project named aerial viewing that is more interactive. I'm just curious, would you bring that kind of interactive installations or those kind of interactivity in your work again?

    KS: I think the answer is, why not? But I don't know why yet. It hasn't been the shift around me that's making me want to work that way quite yet. But I feel like as we move through the world, it changes. And then the way that we want to interact with it changes. That. Interactive work was funny because it was like a one off thing that was fun to do, but it hasn't called to me again to do it. We're not done yet.


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    A: I heard that visuals are the most important things for you to create new things. And then the sound or the other elements come after that to support the visual satisfaction that you have in your films. And then how is that? Is it still the way that you create the new works, or did that change in any ways?

    KS: I now make sound along with the visual, and because I feel like the visual is just like one form of the idea moving through space and time, and I'll make a shot and I'm like, what does that world sound like? What does that feel like in there? And I had to start experimenting with the sound as I go along. So now they kind of start evolving. And it was great because on the last film, the last season that Adam Wade did the sound, I built out the entire. Then is it by live recording? What's that?

    A: Is it by live recording that you made on the spot?

    KS: No, it was like finding everything from wind sounds to mechanical rewind sounds to a song I wanted in there. And I built out the whole soundtrack, and I brought it to Adam, and I'm like, I don't know what our collaboration is going to look like, because before, I just went with a piece that had voice and image, and Adam built the sound, but this time I'm like, I think with the sound to help me figure out the piece at this point. And I brought the soundtrack, and he rebuilt it so much better than I imagined it. He's like, okay, it's really helpful to see what you're thinking about here, but let's actually build this out. And so was so happy working with him, and it was funny because he would make a sound, and I'm like, that's not what it sounds like. He's like, well, what does it sound like? And we'd have to, like, he had me write out emotionally what you wanted someone to feel at every single point in every single shot in the film. And some of the shots are just, like 2 seconds long. So it was just like, I really had to think about what needed to happen in there. And Adam was amazing translating that and making it happen and taking the soundtrack with, like, 20 tracks of sound and then building a new soundtrack. 20 tracks of sound. And it was great.

    A: I think, as we get closer to the end of our conversation, in a way, I see a lot of your works has the implication, or those really opposed, official kind of rebellion in your work. RPM film festival stands for revolution per minute. And then is there the final message would you like to share with RPM festival and as an experimental film artist, what revolution mean to you?

    Wow, that's a great question. The work is questioning procedure, official narratives, kind of authoritarian positions. And I think so much of that is so coded into how we see how the world is imaged, what images circulate, how we circulate, and taking a deeper look at something that could be images of the space race and tying that to larger kind of imperial and nationalistic gestures, or thinking about how gender power dynamics are coded and looking at that through kind of massage books and these examples of touch, I think it's important for us to look at moments that open up into larger gestures of resistance and larger ways of speaking back to what is the official word? Because that's not always these ideas of what's official. What is the idea of progress. It's not universal, and it's always usually to the advantage of some people. So what are the spaces? If you kind of roll back that claim of the official, the authoritative, and then you start to leave room for other stories that push back against those narratives, I think that's something I try to do across all the work.


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    Sunday
    Feb.11
    2PM
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    • Sunday, Feb. 11, 2PM, 2024
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge, MA

    Hymn To Her

    Films by Stan Brakhage & Barbara Hammer


    Hymn To Her: Stan Brakhage & Barbara Hammer

    [Cambridge, Feb.11] – RPM and the Brattle Theatre are thrilled to announce a presentation featuring a collection of six films by avant-garde filmmakers Stan Brakhage and Barbara Hammer. Born as Mary Jane Collom, Jane Wodening (1936 - 2023), a pivotal figure, is featured in numerous films within this series.

    Jane Wodening, an American Writer and Naturalist, authored an impressive 14 books and played a pivotal role as a collaborator alongside Experimental Filmmaker Stan Brakhage. The duo, who married in 1957 and later separated in 1987, left an indelible mark on the world of experimental cinema.

    Stan Brakhage, known for his lyrical films exploring themes of family, childhood, personal experiences, and mortality, often featured himself and his family as central subjects. The 1959 experimental short film "Window Water Baby Moving" chronicles the birth of their first child. All films will be presented in their original 16mm prints. The first three silent pieces, "Hymn to Her" (1974), "Jane" (1985), and "Window Water Baby Moving" (1959), showcase Brakhage's early exploration of intimate and familial themes. The program then transitions to two rare sound films by Stan Brakhage, "The Stars are Beautiful" (1974) and "I...Dreaming" (1988).

    The screening culminates with Barbara Hammer's powerful piece, "Jane Brakhage" (1974)[1], which provides a feminist perspective on Jane, absent in Stan's own work.


    Post-screening discussion: Sarah Keller & Shira Segal
    [1] This film was preserved by Electronic Arts Intermix and the Academy Film Archive through the National Film Preservation Foundation's Avant-Garde Masters Grant program and The Film Foundation. Funding provided by the George Lucas Family Foundation.

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    Hymn to Her
    Stan Brakhage | 1974 | 2.5 minutes | COLOR | SILENT

    Jane
    Stan Brakhage | 1985 | 13 minutes | COLOR | SILENT

    Window Water Baby Moving
    Stan Brakhage | 1959 | 12 minutes | COLOR | SILENT

    The Stars Are Beautiful
    Stan Brakhage | 1974 | 19 minutes | COLOR | SOUND

    I...Dreaming
    Stan Brakhage | 1988 | 8 minutes | COLOR | SOUND

    Jane Brakhage
    Barbara Hammer | 1974 | 10 minutes | B&W | SOUND

    Stan Brakhage "Born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1933, Brakhage moved to Denver, Colorado at the age of six. He sang as a boy soprano soloist, dreamed of being a poet, and graduated from South High School in 1951 with a scholarship to Dartmouth. After one semester, he left to pursue a life in the Arts, returning to Denver to make his first film in 1952.
    "As a young man, Brakhage lived in San Francisco and New York associating with many other poets, musicians, painters and filmmakers, including Robert Duncan, Kenneth Rexroth, John Cage, Edgard Varese, Joseph Cornell, Maya Deren and Marie Menken. A youthful "poet-with-a-camera," Brakhage soon emerged as a significant film artist, evolving an entirely new form of first person, lyrical cinema.

    "Brakhage married Jane Collom in 1957, and from the early 60s they lived in Rollinsville, Colorado, making films and raising their five children. Brakhage also continued to travel around the country and abroad becoming a leading figure of the American avant-garde film movement. He lived in Boulder from1986, and in 2002 moved to Canada with his second wife, Marilyn, and their two children.

    "Before his death in March, 2003, Brakhage had completed more than 350 films, ranging from the psycho-dramatic works of the early 1950s to autobiographical lyrics, mythological epics, "documents," and metaphorical film 'poems' -- variously employing his uniquely developed hand-held camera and rapid editing techniques, multiple superimpositions, collages, photographic abstractions, and elaborate hand-painting applied directly to the surface of the film. A deeply personal filmmaker, Brakhage's great project was to explore the nature of light and all forms of vision - while encompassing a vast range of subject matter. He frequently referred to his works as "visual music," or as documents of "moving visual thinking." The majority of his films are intentionally silent.

    "Brakhage taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and as Distinguished Professor of Film Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The recipient of three Honorary Degrees and numerous prestigious awards, he lectured extensively on filmmaking and the Arts, and is the author of 11 books - including his seminal 1963 work, Metaphors On Vision, and his more recent series of essays, Telling Time."

    Marilyn Brakhage
    Victoria, BC Canada

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    Barbara Hammer

    Barbara Hammer is a visual artist primarily working in film and video. Her work reveals and celebrates marginalized peoples whose stories have not been told. Her cinema is multi-leveled and engages an audience viscerally and intellectually with the goal of activating them to make social change. She has been honored with 5 retrospectives in the last 3 years: The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, Tate Modern in London, Jeu de Paume in Paris, the Toronto International Film Festival and Kunsthalle Oslo in Norway. Her book Hammer! Making Movies Out of Sex and Life was published in 2010 by The Feminist Press at The City University of New York.

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    Hymn to Her
    Stan Brakhage | 1974 | 2.5 minutes | COLOR | SILENT | 16mm

    "HER" to me is always Jane, in the first place, but also Hera: "goddess of women and marriage," naturally enough. Then, too, as it is a hymn of light, and as he/me feels the self that way, it sings of and to itself. -- SB

    Pages from Jane Wodening’s scrapbook including a photograph of her and Stan Brakhage, 1958-1967

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    Jane
    Stan Brakhage | 1985 | 13 minutes | COLOR | SILENT | 16mm

    Someone said to me, of this film, that it was really about light; but Jane (who takes it as a portrait - i.e., sees herself in it) said: "you gave me the moon and seven stars." -- SB

    Film still: Window Water Baby Moving

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    Window Water Baby Moving
    Stan Brakhage | 1959 | 12 minutes | COLOR | SILENT | 16mm

    "... Brakhage's treatment of the birth of his daughter. Here he unleashes the full power of his technique, so apt to become abstractly unintelligible when left to his own devices, on a specific subject. The result is a picture so forthright, so full of primitive wonder and love, so far beyond civilization in its acceptance that it becomes an experience like few in the history of the movies." - Arthur Winsten, The New York Post

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    The Stars Are Beautiful
    Stan Brakhage | 1974 | 19 minutes | COLOR | SOUND | 16mm

    The film is dedicated to James Broughton.
    This is the first sound film I've completed since 1962 - the first sync-sound ever. It is a philosophical film ... extending the realm of BLUE MOSES. Its finest viewer, so far, has written:
    "The sun, - moon - and stars, really are the footprints of God.
    / "- and the broken fragments of the mirror that reflects reality. -
    / "- and they are quite beautiful. I had not seen them before. -" - John Newell
    -- SB

    This project was supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

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    I...Dreaming
    Stan Brakhage | 1988 | 8 minutes | COLOR | SOUND | 16mm

    This is a setting-to-film of a "collage" of Stephen Foster phrases by composer Joel Haertling. The recurring musical themes and melancholia of Foster refer to "loss of love" in the popular "torch song" mode; but the film envisions a re-awakening of such senses-of-love as children know, and it posits (along a line of words scratched over picture) the psychology of waiting.

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    Jane Brakhage
    Barbara Hammer | 1974 | 10 minutes | B&W | SOUND | 16mm

    "I picked up Stan and Jane Brakhage at the airport and drove them to San Francisco State College where Stan spoke about his films to the student body. I was fascinated with Jane. She was so interested in the world around her while Stan seemed caught up only in his ideas. She picked seed pods from trees and plants and told me she had written a lexicon of dog language. She was so much more complex than Stan's portrayal of her in Window Water Baby Moving (1958) that I decided to make a documentary about her for my graduate project." — Barbara Hammer

    This film was preserved by Electronic Arts Intermix and the Academy Film Archive through the National Film Preservation Foundation's Avant-Garde Masters Grant program and The Film Foundation. Funding provided by the George Lucas Family Foundation.



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    Tuesday
    Feb.20
    7PM
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    • Tuesday, Feb. 20th, 7PM
      Boston City Hall Plaza

      Civic Pavilion
      5 Congress St.
      Boston
      MA 02203

    To Weave and Sing


    RPM Festival, in collaboration with Non-Event, proudly announces the co-presentation of "To Weave and Sing," an immersive evening of experimental film and new music performance, supported by the Boston Mayor's Office of Art and Culture. The event is scheduled to take place on February 20th from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM at the Boston City Hall Civic Pavilion.
    "To Weave and Sing" promises to be a captivating experience, featuring a curated selection of three exceptional short films and a solo set by the guitarist, improviser, and composer Lautaro Mantilla. The event aims to showcase the intersection of contemporary experimental cinema and the cross-pollination of new music performances.
    The title "To Weave and Sing" is borrowed from anthropologist David Guss's eponymous book, the first in-depth analysis of the rich spiritual and artistic traditions of the Carib-speaking Yekuana Indians of Venezuela. Drawing inspiration from this title, the event hopes to continue the practice of exploring and celebrating cultural richness through artistic expression.

    "To Weave and Sing" is part of the RPM at Boston City Hall Civic Pavilion series, an initiative aimed at promoting contemporary experimental cinema and fostering a creative dialogue between visual and auditory art forms.

    The collaboration has received support from the Boston Mayor's Office of Art and Culture, emphasizing the city's commitment to nurturing and showcasing the arts.

    The film lineup includes:
    Watunna by Stacey Steers - A mesmerizing hand-painted animation.
    Here where everything ends
    by Cláudia Cárdenas and Juce Filho - A lyrical exploration of film.
    Panorama
    by Djuly Gava and Daniel Leão - An insightful essay film.

    The evening will conclude with a spellbinding solo guitar set by experimental musician Lautaro Mantilla.
    "To Weave and Sing" is free and open to the public.

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    Watunna
    Stacey Steers
    1989 | 24mins | USA | 16mm to HD | Color | Sound

    Here where everything ends
    Cláudia CÁRDENAS & JUCE FILHO
    2023 | 19mins | Brazil | 16mm to HD | color | Sound

    Panorama
    Djuly Gava & Daniel Leão
    2023 | 17mins | Brazil | 4K | Color | Sound

    Guitar Improvisation
    Lautaro Mantilla
    30mins

    program thumb About Non-event:

    [Non-Event is a Boston-based concert series devoted to the presentation of experimental, abstract, improvised, and adventurous music from New England and around the world.]

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    Lautaro Mantilla

    Solo Guitar Set
    30mins

    LAUTARO MANTILLA, DMA is a guitarist, composer, and improviser from Bogotá, Colombia. In his performances, he typically combines guitar, extended vocalization techniques, and homebuilt electronics to create music that is both viscerally affecting and conceptually rigorous. Based in Boston, Lautaro is active in the NY and Boston music scenes and is a faculty member of the Contemporary Musical Arts department at New England Conservatory (Boston). Lautaro holds a Bachelor’s degree in Classical guitar from Pontificia Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá (Colombia), a Master’s in guitar and improvisation and a Doctorate in composition, both from New England Conservatory (Boston/USA)

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    Watunna
    Stacey Steers

    1989 | 24mins | USA | 16mm to HD | Color | Sound

    The creation myths of the Yekuana Indians of the Orinoco region of Venezuela provide a transparent look at the poetic process by which human beings construct meaning from their experience. Narrated by Stan Brakhage. Music and sound by Bruce Odland.

    Stacey Steers is known internationally for her process-driven, labor-intensive films comprising thousands of handmade works on paper. Her work employs images appropriated from early cinematic sources, from which she constructs original, lyrical narratives.
    Stacey’s animated short films have been screened throughout the U.S. and abroad and have received numerous awards. Her work has been featured at the Sundance Film Festival, Telluride Film Festival, Locarno International Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, New Directors New Films, New York, MoMA, The Lincoln Center, New York City, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
    Stacey is a recipient of major grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, Creative Capital, and the American Film Institute. She is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. She lives and works in Boulder, Colorado.

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    Here where everything ends
    Cláudia CÁRDENAS & JUCE FILHO

    2023 | 19mins | Brazil | 16mm to HD | color | Sound

    Here where everything ends is a poetic and experimental short-film that travels in between documentary and fiction to approach a culture faced with extinction: the indigenous peoples of Brazil. It is particularly about the sharing of knowledge of the Bugio village, and made in a collective way in every stage of 16mm footage, botanical revelation and sound caption. It tries to reactivate the memories of the origins of the Laklãnõ/Xokleng people, while observing what is lost with the alienation of their knowledge and culture practiced by colonialism.

    Cláudia Cárdenas (Rio de Janeiro, 1961) is an experimental audiovisual artist. Cláudia develops research work in video, film and experimental audio, as well as in the creation of experimental audiovisual works at Duo Strangloscope. She is also the creator and curator of Strangloscope – International Conference on Audio, Video / Film and Experimental Performance, which this year was in its 14th edition. Cláudia and Rafael, as Duo Strangloscope, started to carry out workshops and tutorials in experimental residencies in video both in Brazil and abroad for festivals around the world. Their research has currently focused on experimental works with video art, expanded cinema and installation performances of different natures and in different supports.

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    Panorama
    Djuly Gava & Daniel Leão

    2023 | 17mins | Brazil | 4K | Color | Sound

    Panorama is a marginal film like Panorama, one of the largest housing projects in southern Brazil. Located on the side of a highway on the outskirts of Florianópolis, the Panorama Housing Project was built in 1989, the year of the first Brazilian presidential election after the end of the military dictatorship. Through the appropriation of archival footage of the residents, the film narrates the passage of time in community life. Directed and edited by residents of the complex, Panorama is both an ode to possible joys of everyday life and a subtle reflection about what leads us to photograph, the ways of permanence of the past and the migration of images from familiar contexts to the public and common territory of the cinematic space.

    Djuly Gava (Florianópolis, 1995) holds a master's degree in Contemporary Artistic Processes and graduated in Visual Arts by the State University of Santa Catarina. She participates in exhibitions and art fairs since 2013, such as: 11th National Salon Victor Meirelles, 2022; 15th National Salon of Itajaí, 2021; Tijuana Printed Art Fair, Casa do Povo, São Paulo/SP, 2019; Microutopias - Feria de Arte Impreso de Montevideo, Centro Cultural España, Montevideo/Uruguay, 2019. Her photographic work is part of the collection of Santa Catarina Art Museum. She has been working with cinema since 2015.

    Daniel Leão (Rio de Janeiro, 1984) is a documentary filmmaker, visual artist, professor and book editor. Graduated in cinema from Fluminense Federal University (2010), Master in Image and Sound Analysis from the same institution, Doctor in Visual Arts from State University of Santa Catarina with a sandwich period at New York University (2020) and is currently carrying out post-doctoral research in the area of Literature about the Brazilian documentaries about the coup d’état against former president Dilma Rousseff. Daniel has been working as documentarist and visual artist since 2013, works that have been exhibited in several Brazilian and international institutions, such as the Museum of Modern Art in New York (MoMA).



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    RPM23
    PROGRAMS

    Program 10:
    Local Winds

    • New England Student Showcase


      Thursday
      Dec. 14th, 7PM
      Goethe-Institut Boston
      170 Beacon Street
      Boston, MA 02116
      Guest Curated by
      Brett Melican (MassArt)
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    Program 11:
    Home and Away

    • The Documentary and Avant-garde Films of Barbara Meter


      Thursday
      Dec. 14th, 9PM
      Goethe-Institut Boston
      170 Beacon Street
      Boston, MA 02116
    • Guest Curated by
      Robin Roblee-Strauss (Hampshire College)
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    RPM Solo Artist:
    Douglas Urbank
    The Space Between
    • Sunday
      Dec. 3rd, 2PM
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge MA
      617-876-6837
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    RPM Solo Artist:
    Movement Exercises Trilogy
    Sarah Friedland
    • Tuesday
      Nov. 7th, 8PM
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge MA
      617-876-6837
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    Cycles and Rhythms:
    RPM Festival, Pittsburgh Edition
    • Thursday
      Nov. 16, 2023
      Pittsburgh Sound + Image
      Eberle Studios
      229 E 9th Avenue
      Homestead, PA, 15120
      Tickets: $10
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    Palimpsest
    RPM Festival,
    Macau Edition
    • Saturday
      Nov. 25th, 7PM
      牛房倉庫
      Ox Warehouse

      15 Rua do Volong,
      GF, 1F & 2F Gallery
      Macau

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    FREE SCREENING
    RPM Solo Artist: Vincent Grenier
    • Wednesday
      Sept. 27th, 7PM
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge MA
      617-876-6837
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    Program 01: Illuminations
    • Thursday
      Sept. 28th, 7PM
      Goethe-Institut Boston
      170 Beacon Street
      Boston, MA 02116
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    Program 02:
    Recollections
    • Thursday
      Sept. 28th, 9PM
      Goethe-Institut Boston
      170 Beacon Street
      Boston, MA 02116
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    Program 03:
    Decomposition
    • Friday
      Sept. 29th, 6PM
      at Screening Room 2300
      University Hall
      UMass-Boston
      University Drive North
      Dorchester
      MA 02125
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    FREE SCREENING
    Program 04:
    Bodies in Motion
    • Friday
      Sept. 29th, 8PM
      at Screening Room 2300
      University Hall
      UMass-Boston
      University Drive North
      Dorchester
      MA 02125
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    FREE SCREENING
    Program 05:
    Traces
    • Saturday
      Sept. 30th, 2PM
      Harvard FAS CAMLab
      Lower Level
      485 Broadway Cambridge
      MA 02138
      Harvard University


      Festival Reception
      from 6-8pm
      Harvard FAS CAMLab
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    FREE SCREENING
    Program 06:
    Chronicles
    • Saturday
      Sept. 30th, 4PM
      Harvard FAS CAMLab
      Lower Level
      485 Broadway Cambridge
      MA 02138
      Harvard University

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    FREE SCREENING
    Program 07:
    Thresholds
    • Saturday
      Sept. 30th, 8PM
      Harvard FAS CAMLab
      Lower Level
      485 Broadway Cambridge
      MA 02138
      Harvard University

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    FREE SCREENING
    Program 08:
    Unknown Languages
    • Sunday
      Oct. 1, 2PM
      Harvard FAS CAMLab
      Lower Level
      485 Broadway Cambridge
      MA 02138
      Harvard University

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    FREE SCREENING
    Program 09:
    Drifts & Detours
    • Sunday
      Oct. 1, 4PM
      Harvard FAS CAMLab
      Lower Level
      485 Broadway Cambridge
      MA 02138
      Harvard University

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    FREE SCREENING
    Waiting for Snow:
    Michael Snow Tribute
    • Tuesday
      Oct. 17th, 7PM
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge MA
      617-876-6837
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    RPM Exhibition: Room to Breathe
    • Sept. 5 - Oct. 28, 2023
      University Hall Gallery
      UMass-Boston
      University Drive North
      Dorchester
      MA 02125

      The University Hall Gallery is open Monday through Saturday 12pm–5pm.

      Public Reception: September 29th
      from 5-7pm at the University Hall Gallery
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    Thursday
    Dec.14
    7PM
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    • Thursday, Dec. 14, 7PM, 2023
      Goethe-Institut Boston
      170 Beacon Street
      Boston, MA 02116


    Local Winds

    RPM Festival: New England Student Showcase


    The RPM Student Shorts Showcase aims to spotlight unconventional works by student filmmakers from New England, exploring realms beyond conventional cinema. This includes experimental films, documentaries, and animations that push the boundaries of traditional filmmaking. The featured works encompass a diverse range, showcasing hand-altered and hand-developed analog film, narrative experiments, and poetic, personal reflections on the cinematic medium. Join us in celebrating the emerging generation of local experimental filmmakers who are actively broadening the language of cinema.

    In its inaugural year, the RPM New England Student Film Showcase attracted a total of 42 submissions from 12 universities and colleges, such as Emerson, MassArt, UMass-Amherst, UMass-Boston, Boston College, Harvard, Brown, Dartmouth, Keene State, Amherst College, Suffolk, and Fitchburg State. The final selection consists of 14 exceptional finalists, forming a captivating hour-long program.

    This program is curated by Brett Melican, a local filmmaker, AgX Film Collective member, and recent graduate of MassArt.


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    After Work, Tuesday Night - Blake Tianyi Shao
    Brown University, HD, B&W, sound, 1:21 mins

    "Time is a loop", I wish - Yue Hua
    Emerson College, 16mm, B&W , sound, 3:28 mins

    Séance - Charlie De Koster
    MassArt, 16mm, B&W, sound, 8 mins

    Menorrhagia - Claire Maske
    Emerson College, 16mm to HD, B&W, sound, 5:36 mins

    Headlands - Cecelia Clare Meade
    Emerson College, 16mm, B&W, sound, 4:37 mins

    September Space - Bree Andruzzi
    MassArt, HD, Color, sound, 5:47 mins

    Room Tone - Ren Evans
    MassArt, Digital, color, sound, 3:51 mins

    Time For Supper -Kyle Lindfors
    Fitchburg State University, Digital, color, sound, 1:30 mins

    Sorry it took me so long.. to See -Leticia Sidney
    UMass-Boston, 8mm to HD, B&W, sound, 1:57 mins

    Our Shadows - Polly Chesnokova
    Dartmouth College, HD, Color , sound, 16:05 mins

    Never Forget Death - Tomás Orrego
    Emerson College, 16mm to HD, color, sound, 2 mins

    Fragments from the End of History - Chris Connell
    MassArt, 16mm, color, sound, 6:48 mins

    Can You Carry Me - Tess Meersman
    Emerson College, 16mm, B&W, sound, 5:47 mins

    Never Forget Death - Tomás Orrego
    Emerson College, 16mm to HD, color, sound, 2 mins


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    Guest Curator Brett Melican

    Brett Melican is a filmmaker based in Boston, Massachusetts whose work mixes narrative and experimental forms, exploring fractured relationships and psychological isolation in a blend of genres. He is a member of the AgX Film Collective, and helps organize and program local film festivals alongside work in camera and lighting departments on independent and commercial productions.



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    After Work, Tuesday Night - Blake Tianyi Shao
    Brown University, HD, B&W, sound, 1:21 mins

    Overwork, exploitation, and exhaustion oversaturate modern work-life. Each day seems to become an endless, mechanical cycle of commuting and tedious tasks, rinse and repeat. The film Tuesday Night, After Work provides a whimsical and ethereal attempt to portray the inescapability of the repetitive cycle of labor. Religious elements are widely used auditorially and visually, painting work as a divine order and thus reflecting the absurd coerciveness of the modern work-life. The film, aside from giving an ironic and amusing take on labor conditions, also begs the question of why that comes to be.

    Blake Shao is a filmmaker, animator, and designer from Jinan, China, currently attending Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, US. He has worked in China and the United State in various productions of short films, music videos, documentaries, and short films.

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    "Time is a loop", I wish - Yue Hua
    Emerson College, 16mm, B&W , sound, 3:28 mins

    A personal poetic film composed of hybrid media of 16mm and motion graphics.
    “When I was little, time was slow and I thought I could catch time...Now I made a wish.” The filmmaker transcribes feelings on time and loss with toys, wobbly cradle Balance Balls, and light and shadow.

    Yue Hua/华越 is an artist and filmmaker based in Boston, focusing on visual storytelling and intermedia artwork. Her work ranges from narrative shorts, experimental films, expanded cinema, and collage artwork.

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    Séance - Charlie De Koster
    MassArt, 16mm, B&W, sound, 8 mins

    Séance is a film about feeling like you're speaking from beyond the grave.

    Charlie De Koster is a non-binary filmmaker from Boston, currently attending Massachusetts College of Art and Design. They make work that addresses ideas of home, remembrance, and lost media – exploring how these concepts interact with identity. Presently, they are a Teacher’s Assistant to Professor Adam Savje for his VFX Alchemy class, in which students create visual effects with a variety of analog and contemporary animation tools. They relish working with the optical printer and the Oxberry animation stand, which allows them to push their work further and has inspired a love of analog film in their practice. Their work has been showcased in a Grrl Haus Film program at the Brattle Theatre in Cambridge, MA.

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    Headlands - Cecelia Clare Meade
    Emerson College, 16mm, B&W, sound, 4:37 mins

    An elderly person goes on a journey through their childhood as they grapple to grieve their youth.

    My names Cecelia Clare Meade, I am from the Bay Area California and now live in Boston attending Emerson College. I love drawing, filmmaking, animation and all thing's creative.

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    Menorrhagia - Claire Maske
    Emerson College, 16mm to HD, B&W, sound, 5:36 mins

    A personal documentary reflecting on shame and menstruation through an experience with a little-researched condition called menorrhagia.

    Blending documentary and studio art practices, my work explores themes of illness, anatomy, grief, and mortality. I am largely interested in the body and all the ways it can mutate, deviate, and, ultimately, fail. I typically begin with a piece of documentary audio, whether that be an interview, a performance of nonfiction writing, or myself speaking in voiceover. Then, using combinations of animation, handwriting, 16mm footage, digital footage, and archival materials, I build up visuals which supplement and guide the interpretation of the audio. The visual choices are driven by emotion; I am less interested in a documentary rooted in fact than one which most accurately portrays an experience from the perspective of the person living it. From cancer to menstruation to neurological disorders, I often use film as an attempt to recreate the subjective experience of physical suffering, or to grapple with the emotions that come along with sickness and loss. These films can serve not only as a site of healing for those sharing their experiences but as a way for myself and audiences to wrap their minds around the possibility of their own body’s demise. In order to address power imbalances often present in traditional documentary modes, my work often lands at the intersection of personal and co-created film, and is rooted in feminist, queer, and disability studies. I am inspired by women who explore personal stories in relation to larger philosophical questions- Bell Hooks, Barbara Hammer, Agnes Varda, Jeanette Winterson, Lynne Sachs- and am influenced by sketchbook and scrapbook aesthetics. In order to offset the emotional intensity of this work, I take on lighter projects involving 16mm and stop motion in interim periods. These projects serve as containers to learn and play, helping me expand the tools available to me as I continue to build a body of work that attempts over and over again to approach and understand death.

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    September Space - Bree Andruzzi
    MassArt, HD, Color, sound, 5:47 mins

    Still form agitates tension in space with no release of force. Elongated human isolation creates concentrated stress. When interacting with each other, they seek comfort that is implausible and causes both to slip.

    Bree Andruzzi is a moving image artist based in Brooklyn, NY. She seeks to balance the cinematic relationship between herself and her audience, and while doing so, investigates identity, ambiguity, and psychological effects from audio-visuals. She uses both film and video in her practice and considers the functionality with these tools to further her ideas. Andruzzi received her Bachelor’s degree in the Film and Video department at Massachusetts College of Art and Design Spring '23 and has previously studied at the University of Michigan, Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design.

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    Room Tone - Ren Evans
    MassArt, Digital, color, sound, 3:51 mins

    Room Tone is an experimental sound and space piece inspired by Alvin Lucier's I Am Sitting in a Room. This piece explores the reverb and acoustics which create the auditory finger print of a childhood home.

    Ren is an interdisciplinary artist and filmmaker/directress based in Boston, MA. Her work is imbued with + dictated by her love for the transcendent nature of visual storytelling and the medium of moving image. She is deeply inspired by nostalgia and expressing the intangible and unreal through film and design. With a background in fine arts, Ren is gravitated to experimentally investigating moving image and how to use the medium in innovative and evocative ways.

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    Time For Supper -Kyle Lindfors
    Fitchburg State University, Digital, color, sound, 1:30 mins

    Recorded some film and messed around with it. A collage of some expression or other.

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    Sorry it took me so long.. to See -Leticia Sidney
    UMass-Boston, 8mm to HD, B&W, sound, 1:57 mins

    In the short film, Sorry it took me so long.. to see, I experimented for the first time with regular 8mm film. This film became a visual sort of diary entry about a horse I’ve driven by countless times in the last five years that I had never stopped to see up close.

    Leticia Sidney is based in Boston and works primarily with printmaking and video. She approaches her art experimentally and as a means of understanding and responding to what is familiar but unclear. Her work is personal and particularly interested in exploring memory and abstraction. With video, she enjoys experimenting with rhythm and displacement of image and sound.

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    Our Shadows - Polly Chesnokova
    Dartmouth College, HD, Color , sound, 16:05 mins

    Facing the imminence of an arranged marriage, a lesbian couple navigates their future in Western Ukraine, guided by the centuries-old Hutsul myths

    Polly Chesnokova is a cinematography student in their senior year at Dartmouth College. Originally from Kyiv, Ukraine, Polly takes much inspiration from Eastern European cinematic traditions. As a non-binary artist, Polly strives to explore the themes of gender-fluidity and gender-neutral society through their films and other visual mediums.

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    Fragments from the End of History - Chris Connell
    MassArt, 16mm, color, sound, 6:48 mins

    Sixteen mm footage of a man wandering a wasteland treated with bleach and washing soda, then painted, set to audio drawn from data-moshed clips from The Curse of Frankenstein. The film is a meditation on the concept of the end of history from Hegel's and Mary Shelley's context of the Napoleonic era to the creation of the atomic bomb at the end of World War 2, to the present, and considers the immanence of the apocalyptic future in the origins of bourgeois society.

    I seek to reflect on the place of the present in relation to history, both in our responsibilities to the past and the possibility of an emancipated utopian future. To this end I explore the relationship of war and media, the relationship of cinema to literary traditions, and the generalized crisis of cinema's evidentiary function.

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    Can You Carry Me - Tess Meersman Emerson College, 16mm, B&W, sound, 5:47 mins

    Can you carry me? uses old familial artifacts such as super eight film, mini dv tapes, and old teeth to examine generational remembrances and the influence that the passing down of memory plays on the development of identity.

    Tess Meersman is a recent graduate of Emerson College having studied Media arts Production, Literature, and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality studies. Her areas of concentration lie in Producing, Development, and Experimental Filmmaking. Her personal works mainly focus the concept of the body, gender, and memory.

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    Never Forget Death - Tomás Orrego
    Emerson College, 16mm to HD, color, sound, 2 mins

    The destruction of the banana is a delicious action reaction that brings forth dreams of vulnerable joy to the subject.

    Inspired by the films of Kenneth Anger.

    Tomás Orrego is a peruvian filmmaker, visual artist, designer, and musician with a background in architecture. Spanning animation, design, collage, and installation, his work touches in a very idiosyncratic way the construction of male heterosexuality and the disruption of innocence. By using free association and an absurd approach, these themes are explored in an irrational way, eschewing logic, and embracing the drowsy consciousness of dreams. ​ He currently lives in Boston, taking part in the MFA Film and Media Art program at Emerson College, trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle by exercising and eating.

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    Thursday
    Dec.14
    9PM
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    • Thursday, Dec. 14, 9PM, 2023
      Goethe-Institut Boston
      170 Beacon Street
      Boston, MA 02116

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    Home and Away

    The Documentary and Avant-garde Films of Barbara Meter



    Curated by Robin Roblee-Strauss

    Home and Away features one biographical documentary and four short avant-garde films by filmmaker, Barbara Meter. As one of the first women to study at the Netherlands Film Academy in the 1960s and co-founder of Amsterdam's Electric Cinema, a bastion of avant-garde film and ideas in the 1970s, Barbara has been a pioneer in the production and promotion of experimental filmmaking in the Netherlands. In a 1971 interview, Barbara describes her work as “pure films”, conveying “thoughts and feelings by pure movement, a pure image that may flicker or be blurred, and by intervening in the process of developing and printing the film.” Through her innovative use of optical printing methods, she seamlessly massages, and reworks found sounds and images: combining them with her personal archive. She remolds these documents into distinct, deeply personal sense worlds.





    This program showcases a range of works made throughout Barbara’s artistic career which echo deep psychological themes tied to the destabilizing effects the Second World War wrought on her family life and personal sense of home. Her notion of “wanting to belong to something you can’t reach” is explored prismatically in this film program by showing a biographical documentary work which explore her family’s history during WWII alongside experimental films that represent the universal feelings of yearning to belong, the pain of separation, the distance felt in estrangement, and the joy of homecomings.

    Throughout Barbara’s life she has continued to create work, program screenings, and teach and lecture on film. Her work has been shown at Rotterdam Film Festival, BFI London Film Festival, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, Filmmuseum Amsterdam, Tate Gallery London, Cinematheque San Francisco, the Museum of the Moving Image in New York City among many other venues in Europe. Home and Away is the first solo exhibition that combines her experimental work alongside her documentaries and the second solo exhibition of her films in North America.

    Additional information about Barbara Meter
    can be found at her website (https://www.barbarameter.com/) and
    via Light Cone
    (https://lightcone.org/en/filmmaker- 470-barbara-meter).


    From The Exterior
    1970, 16mm, color, silent, 9 min

    Up To The Sky, And Much Much More
    2015, video, color, sound, 36 min

    Convalescing
    2000, 16mm (from super 8), color, silent, 3 mins

    Quay
    2003, 16mm, color, sound, 4 mins

    Ariadne
    2004, 16mm, color, sound, 12 mins

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    From The Exterior
    1970, 16mm, color, silent, 9 min

    A nocturnal view of existences left to themselves, seen from the other side. A handheld camera peers covertly through open-curtained windows, overlapping lives: faces, silhouetted figures, rouge lampshades, houseplants, blinking TV sets, cigarettes, poodles, and amber orbs – unobtrusive fragments of an evening spent at home.

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    Up To The Sky, And Much Much More
    2015, video, color, sound, 36 min

    Barbara Meter tells the life story of her father Leo Meter, using slides, photographs, drawings, and the letters her father wrote to her after being arrested by the Gestapo and deported to the Eastern Front. Barbara Meter reflects, "There are not many testimonies from Germans who resisted fascism – my father was one of them, and I could tell it. So, I dug up what I found of him – photos, letters, drawings, stories – and recorded it. During the making of the film, I felt that step by step I came closer to who he had been, and also closer to the love and protection I experienced from him – even if I was too little to remember his presence clearly. In Poland, I was very close to where he had died. There were only empty fields of grain and old broken houses ... such an estranged feeling that there were no signs left of the cruel fighting that had happened there. For myself, this gap has been filled, and I hope for some others too."

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    Convalescing
    2000, 16mm (from super 8), color, silent, 3 mins

    Confined to a room, one reads, looks, and listens. In these moments of distance from the world, Barbara Meter considers “the blue, the light of the television, the blue, the book, the patterns, the light, the blue. Time to appreciate how much that really is.”

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    Quay
    2003 16mm, color, sound, 4 mins

    A study of arrivals, maritime comings and goings: vessels dock, sailors throw ropes, drop anchor, and people poised on platforms await friends or families. Then the choreography of reunions begins. Barbara writes: “Arriving at an island is a joy forever. The magic of ships when they dock, the expectation on the quays, the exciting theatre of the people with and without their vehicles, the saying hello and goodbye are everyday experiences on the Greek islands.”

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    Ariadne
    2004, 16mm, color, sound, 12 mins

    A haptic hymn to longing restlessness and desire – movement of the wheels, a spool of string, sprockets, feet, and hands suggests cycles of renewal and reinvention. An anonymous woman– could it be Ariadne who gave Theseus the thread to find his way out of the labyrinth? Or perhaps one of the ancient fates spinning the yarn of destiny…

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    Guest Curator Robin Roblee-Strauss is a lebenskünstler—a life-artist! Born and raised in the woodlands of Western Massachusetts. he has always gravitated towards filmmaking as an approach to research that combines scholarly investigation with artistic expression. At Hampshire College he studied non-fiction & experimental film, psychology, and critical disability studies. Robin has assisted several experimental filmmakers including Abraham Ravett, Barbara Meter, Ansuya Blom, and Abigail Child. He worked at Anthill Sound Design in the Netherlands as a sound editor and most recently as a research assistant on an archival documentary series directed by Luke Meyer. Curation is a new facet of his practice motivated by his investment in the haptic qualities of sound and the moving image works as a way to communicate through the senses—articulating alternative ways of knowing.

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    Sunday
    Dec.3
    2PM
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    • Sunday, Dec. 3, 2PM, 2023
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge, MA


    The Space Between
    Douglas Urbank


    Douglas Urbank, based in Boston, Massachusetts, is an artist with a background in sculpture and drawing who began to experiment with filmmaking in 2008. His short films have screened in festivals and curated programs, including nationally at Revolutions Per Minute Festival, Boston, Massachusetts; Microscope Gallery and Millennium Film Workshop in New York; San Francisco Cinematheque’s Crossroads Film Festival; Moviate Underground Film Festival, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Chicago Underground Film Festival; Engauge Experimental Film Festival, Seattle, Washington; and internationally at Mire Lab’s PRISME festival, Nantes, France; and curated programs including, Zumzeig Cinema, Barcelona; Laboratorio Experimental de Cine program, Mexico City; Artist Film Workshop, Melbourne, Australia; and others. He was a Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellowships Film & Video finalist in both 2017 and 2019.

    Beginning in 2001 he co-hosted a radio program devoted to experimental, improvisational, and other unconventional music and sound art. He has been a member of Fort Point Theatre Channel, an independent theater company which brings together an ensemble of artists from the worlds of theater, music, and visual arts. And he is a founding member of the AgX Film Collective. He is interested in cross-pollination between art forms on the fringes of alternative culture: experimental music, film and theater.

    Program: 65 minutes

    Projection Format: 16mm film & Digital





    Bathers
    16mm, B&W, sound, 2019, 03:45

    Oracle
    16mm, color, sound, 2014, 07:20

    Portrait
    16mm, B&W, silent, 2017, 05:15

    Small
    16mm, B&W, silent, 2023, 04:30

    Cartoon Dream
    16mm to video, color, silent, 2023, 05:45

    Hotel Cassiopeia: Algiers part 1
    video, color, sound, 2013, 03:45

    Splash
    16mm to video, color, sound, 2012, 02:40

    Skate
    16mm to video, B&W, sound, 2019, 03:00

    Cryptogram (v.5)
    16mm to video, color, silent, 2022, 04:40

    Move
    16mm to video, B&W, sound, 2021, 04:40

    3 Notes to a Redwood Tree
    16mm to video, color, sound, 2023, 09:30

    Sojourn
    16mm to video, color, sound, 2010, 01:50 Post Screening Q&A Alison Folland & Douglas Urbank

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    Bathers

    16mm, B&W, sound, 2019, 03:45:

    Three friends, the beach, the waves, their brief time together.

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    Oracle

    16mm, color, sound, 2014, 07:20:

    The Oracle answers a question.

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    Portrait

    16mm, B&W, silent, 2017, 05:15:

    An imagined portrait, a handmade, stream-of-consciousness improvisation.

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    Small

    16mm, B&W, silent, 2023, 04:30:

    The inner lives of figurines.

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    Cartoon Dream

    16mm to video, color, silent, 2023, 05:45:

    A found cartoon copied twice, in sequence, four rolls of 16mm film, contact printing, optical printing.

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    Hotel Cassiopeia: Algiers part 1

    video, color, sound, 2013, 03:45:

    Hotel Cassiopeia, a play by Charles Mee, imagines the fantasy world of artist, Joseph Cornell. The script includes three direct dialog excerpts from two Hollywood films: Algiers featuring Hedy Lamarr and To Have and Have Not with Lauren Bacall. This video is one of the three made for a Fort Point Theatre Channel production in Boston, intended as a reflection Cornell's found footage films Rose Hobart and By Night with Torch and Spear.

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    Splash

    16mm to video, color, sound, 2012, 02:40:

    Young bather, sand, waves, surf, synthetic soundtrack.

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    Skate

    16mm to video, B&W, sound, 2019, 03:00:

    Winter, Boston Common Frog Pond, 16mm film and in-camera editing.

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    Cryptogram (v.5)

    16mm to video, color, silent, 2022, 04:40:

    Double 8mm film and in-camera editing, landscape, cityscape, brick, glass, water, trees, windows, abstraction.

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    Move

    16mm to video, B&W, sound, 2021, 04:40:

    Rhythms of children, birds, and insects.

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    3 Notes to a Redwood Tree

    16mm to video, color, sound, 2023, 09:30:

    The space between.

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    Sojourn

    16mm to video, color, sound, 2012, 01:50:

    Arrival, celebration, departure.

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    Tuesday
    Nov. 7
    8PM
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      Nov. 7th, 8PM
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge MA
      617-876-6837
    RPM Solo Artist:
    Sarah Friedland

    MOVEMENT EXERCISES TRILOGY

    RPM Festival and the Brattle Theatre are excited to announce our co-presentation of "Movement Exercises Trilogy," A feature-length trilogy of films by filmmaker-choreographer Sarah Friedland, Movement Exercises deconstructs and revises the choreographic vocabularies of exercises practiced across home, work, and school spaces. The trilogy consists of three short films: Home Exercises (2017), Drills (2020), and Trust Exercises (2022). Movement Exercises examines the premise and promise of the exercise: that by moving together, repeatedly, we both create and recreate the social body.

    Home Exercises
    Digital, 22 minutes, 2017, Color, Sound.

    Drills
    Digital, 17 minutes, 2020, Color, Sound.

    Trust Exercises
    Digital , 25 minutes, 2022, Color, sound.


    Screening format: DCP ( DCP courtesy of Video Data Bank)
    total: 64 mins

    Post-Screening Q&A: Sarah Friedland & Homa Sarabi

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    Sarah Friedland is a filmmaker and choreographer working at the intersection of moving images and moving bodies. Through hybrid, experimental, and movement-based filmmaking, multi-channel video installation, and site-specific live dance performance, she stages and scripts bodies and cameras in concert with one another to elucidate, distill, and revise the embodied patterns of social life and the body politic. Facilitating a research process integrating found movements, gestures, and postures from embodied memories, cinema and archival footage, and contemporary movement languages, she choreographs through practices of interviewing, pre- and re-enactment, adaptation, and improvisational play, shaping dances with diverse communities of performers and movers—from professional dancers to cohorts of seniors and teenagers.

    Her work has screened and been presented in numerous festivals and film spaces including New York Film Festival, New Directors/New Films, Ann Arbor Film Festival, New Orleans Film Festival, BAMcinématek, Mubi, and Anthology Film Archives, in art spaces such as Performa19 Biennial, La MaMa Galleria, MoMA, Sharjah Art Foundation, and Manifattura delle Arti Bologna, and in dance spaces including the American Dance Festival and Dixon Place, among others.



    Brattle Ticket Info


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    Home Exercises
    22 minutes, 2017

    Adapting the form of the home workout video, Home Exercises investigates the gestural habits and choreographies of aging individuals in their homes. Created in collaboration with a group of eight seniors to shape their daily routines into dance for camera, the on-screen movements shift in their fidelity to the daily patterns they reperform. Some elders rigorously reenact their daily actions, whereas others erupt into stylized and rhythmically altered movements. Intertitles precede each exercise, annotating the performances while charting the time of day from morning to nightfall.

    Prior screenings include New Directors/New Film, BAMcinematek, Sharjah Art Foundation, and American Dance Festival, among others.

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    Drills
      17 minutes, 2020

    Drills is a film about the choreography of preparing for the future. A hybrid documentary and experimental dance film reimagining the form of the Cold War-era, US government-produced social guidance film, Drills asks what futures we are preparing for through the exercises embodying present anxieties. Weaving in between multiple forms of choreography and documentation, Drills restages lockdown and active shooter drills, frames corporate and tech start-up office meditation, and reperforms Boy Scout drills from their 1917 manual.

    Past screenings include New York Film Festival (Currents), Prismatic Ground, Pleasure Dome, ICDOCS, Full Frame, Mubi, and Athens International Film and Video Festival, where it won the Film House Award for Visionary Filmmaking, among other festivals and galleries.

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    Trust Exercises
    25 minutes, 2022

    The final film in the trilogy, Trust Exercises explores the tension between the poetics of group movement and its instrumentalization for capitalist management. Amending the choreography of team-building and the visual grammars of corporate video, Trust Exercises braids together movement from three work spaces: a fictional start-up retreat, a body work session as interview, and a dance rehearsal. Movements transmit between performers across scenes, complicating the discrete goals of their choreographies and examining their portability across spheres. Dislocating the movement of the retreat to the space of rehearsal, professional dancers transform stock exercises into intimate social dances. A body work session reconfigures the office environment. Lingering after hours, movement facilitators transmute team-building games into a playful duet.

    Funding for trilogy provided by the Dance Films Association, Rhode Island State Council on the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, and Athens International Film and Video Festival, among others.


    Thursday
    Nov.16
    Pittsburgh
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    • Thursday, Nov. 16, 2023
      Eberle Studios
      229 E 9th Avenue
      Homestead, PA, 15120

      Tickets: $10

    Cycles and Rhythms:
    RPM Festival,
    Pittsburgh Edition


    This touring program features 16mm films by Malic Amalya, Karel Doing, Anna Kipervaser, Ryan Marino, Moviate (Josh Drake, James Hollenbaugh, Jeremy Moss, Caleb Smith), Tomonari Nishikawa, Kathleen Rugh, Josh Weissbach, and Lilan Yang. Exploring the formal and conceptual possibilities of the medium with distinctive approaches, their films showcase the diversity of works shown at RPM Festival in recent years. The event is organized by Benny Shaffer and Wenhua Shi with Pittsburgh Sound + Image.

    Program: 65 minutes

    Projection Format: 16mm film
    Time: doors at 7:30pm,
    screening at 8:00pm.




    Winter’s First Moons - Kathleen Rugh
    3 mins, 2018, USA, color, sound, 16mm

    Radiant Forms - Ryan Marino
    7 mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm

    Babbler, Fairy and Thrush - Karel Doing
    3 mins 44 secs, 2022, UK, B/W, sound, 16mm

    Amusement Ride - Tomonari Nishikawa
    6 mins, 2019, Japan, color, sound, 16mm

    This Is How I Felt - Josh Weissbach
    1 mins 35 secs, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm

    Everything Comes Full Circle - Lilan Yang
    13 mins 44 secs, 2022, USA, B/W & color, digital sound, 16mm

    With the Tide, With the Tide Anna Kipervaser
    2 mins 49 secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm

    Living Lessons in the Museum of Order - Malic Amalya
    20 mins, 2022, USA, B/W and color, sound , 16mm

    Ill Composto - Moviate (Josh Drake, James Hollenbaugh, Jeremy Moss, Caleb Smith)
    3 mins 48 secs, 2023, USA, color, sound, 16mm

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    Winter's First Moons
    - Kathleen Rugh

    3 mins, 2018, USA, color, sound, 16mm
    Following the winter solstice, the longest nights of the year prevail. Through these darkest nights the moon reaches to its fullest. Filmed over numerous nights the moons of different phases are brought together in the black sky. Through multiple exposures on film and editing created in-camera, the moons move and bounce off one another in unpredictable ways. Official NASA sound recordings from space help activate their actions. The stoic moon breaks free and gravitates at will.

    Kathleen Rugh is a filmmaker and photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Her film and photographic work has been exhibited in screenings and galleries throughout the US and internationally, including the Edinburgh International Film Festival, the Images Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Antimatter [Media Art], EXiS Experimental Film Festival, and the Athens International Film and Video Festival. She has received funding for her films through the New York State Council on the Arts.

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    Radiant Forms - Ryan Marino
    7 mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm

    Luminous forms merging in time.

    Ryan Marino is an interdisciplinary artist working with film, sound, and collage. His 16mm films explore the ethereality of time, light, and space. His 16mm films have screened at film festivals and venues including: Anthology Film Archives, New York Film Festival, San Francisco International Film Festival, Milwaukee Underground Film Festival, Uplink (Tokyo), Venice Biennale, Fracto Experimental Film Encounter, Spectacle Theater,​ and Pacific Film Archive. In addition to creating the soundtracks for his own films, his sound work includes original compositions and commissioned soundtracks for short films and theater productions. By day he works as an audiovisual archivist.

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    Babbler, Fairy and Thrush - Karel Doing
    3 mins 44 secs, 2022, UK, B/W, sound, 16mm

    An unfiltered stream of perception: small objects and grand panoramas appear simultaneously. The certainties of near and far, detail and overview, inside and outside are deliberately thrown into confusion. Aided by ‘in camera’ superimposition and travelling mattes a near abstract experience is created. Sunlight filters through semi-transparent surfaces, while small holes and cracks allow the light to travel unrestrained. The work was conceived and shot within a few hundred yards from my house, focusing on the plants, flowers, trees and ferns that grow around me.The soundtrack is composed with noises and voices from that same area, revealing a further abundance of life.

    Karel Doing is an independent artist, filmmaker and researcher whose practice investigates the relationship between culture and nature by means of analogue and organic process, experiment and co-creation.

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    Amusement Ride - Tomonari Nishikawa
    6 mins, 2019, Japan, color, sound, 16mm

    Shot with a telephoto lens from inside a cabin of Cosmo Clock 21, a Ferris wheel at an amusement park in Yokohama, Japan. The distorted image shows the structure of the Ferris wheel, focusing on the intermittent vertical movement, which resembles the movement of a film at the gate of a film projector or camera.

    Tomo NIshikawa
    Nishikawa’s films explore the idea of documenting situations/phenomena through a chosen medium and technique, often focusing on process itself. His films have been screened at numerous film festivals and art venues, including Berlinale, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, London Film Festival, Media City Film Festival, New York Film Festival, Singapore International Film Festival, and Toronto International Film Festival. In 2010, he presented a series of 8mm and 16mm films at MoMA P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, and his film installation, Building 945, received the 2008 Grant Award from the Museum of Contemporary Cinema in Spain. He served as a juror for the 2010 Ann Arbor Film Festival, the 2012 Big Muddy Film Festival, and the 2013 dresdner schmalfilmtage. He is one of the co-founders of KLEX: Kuala Lumpur Experimental Film and Video Festival and Transient Visions: Festival of the Moving Image. He lives in Japan/USA, currently teaching in Cinema Department at Binghamton University.

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    This Is How I Felt - Josh Weissbach
    1 mins 35 secs, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm

    This Is How I Felt was filmed in a twenty-four period while the filmmaker was wearing a heart monitor to investigate possible arrhythmias.

    Josh Weissbach is an experimental filmmaker. He lives in a house with his wife, two daughters, three cats, and six chickens next to a once abandoned village. His films and videos have been shown worldwide in such venues as Ann Arbor Film Festival, Slamdance Film Festival, European Media Art Festival, Mono No Aware, Chicago Underground Film Festival, 25 FPS Festival, and Alchemy Film and Moving Image Festival. He has won jury prizes at Videoex, ICDOCS, $100 Film Festival, Onion City Experimental Film and Video Festival, Berlin Revolution Film Festival, and Haverhill Experimental Film Festival.

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    Everything Comes Full Circle
    - Lilan Yang
    13 mins 44 secs, 2022, USA, B/W & color, digital sound, 16mm

    Following Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas (1984) filming locations from Houston, Texas to Los Angeles, California, I use a 16mm Bolex camera to capture the vastness of the American West. The footage draws me to reminisce about snippets of my everyday life. I contemplate how we perceive the world through analog optical apparatuses and how memories are multidimensional yet fragile. Our recollections of people and places can be distorted, unrecognizable, and fictitious. These memories would eventually diminish with the passing of time. Everything Comes Full Circle is a personal attempt to remember things that will soon be forgotten.
    The original footage was shot in Kodak 16mm film stocks during the summer of 2021 and edited digitally with voiceover. Later the digital moving images were inkjet printed on clear film spliced together with perforations cut out with a laser cutter. Each run of the projection makes the printer ink slowly melt, and the film will eventually fall into decay over the course of time.

    Lilan Yang is an artist and experimental filmmaker from Chongqing, China. Her practice explores the myth of cities and landscapes, ways of seeing and unseeing, and sentiments of remembering and forgetting, through lens-based analog media such as 16mm filmmaking and 35mm photography, as well as digital technologies such as machine learning and data visualization. She received a BS in Computer Engineering from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an MFA in Digital + Media from Rhode Island School of Design.

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    With the Tide, With the Tide
    - Anna Kipervaser
    2 mins 49 secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm


    I know, you're a seasonal beast
    Like the starfish that drift in with the tide
    With the tide
    So until your blood runs
    To meet the next full moon
    Your madness fits in nicely with my own
    With my own
    Your lunacy fits neatly with my own
    My very own
    - from Sea Song by Robert Wyatt

    Anna Kipervaser is a Ukrainian-born artist whose practice engages with a range of topics including human and animal bodies, ethnicity, religion, colonialism, and environmental conservation. Her engagement with these topics is informed by a commitment to formal experimentation, DIY and alternative processes, spanning disciplines including experimental and documentary moving image works in both 16mm film and digital video.

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    Living Lessons in the Museum of Order
    - Malic Amalya
    20 mins, 2022, USA, B/W and color,
    sound , 16mm

    Living Lessons in the Museum of Order examines the carceral logics of the Orca Encounter at SeaWorld San Diego and the “Doing Time” tour of the former Alcatraz prison in the San Francisco Bay. Juxtaposing original 16mm footage, promotional VHS and 16mm footage, and analog video feedback, Living Lessons in the Museum of Order explores the tensions between public fantasies and exploitative practices, as well as between rhetorical and cultural changes, within the two California entertainment empires.

    Malic Amalya (b. 1980. Burlington, VT) is an experimental filmmaker living and working in Boston. Malic is an Assistant Professor of Experimental Media and Film Production at Emerson College. His films have screened widely and are distributed by Canyon Cinema in San Francisco and Collectif Jeune Cinema in Paris.

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    Ill Composto
    - Moviate (Josh Drake, James Hollenbaugh, Jeremy Moss, Caleb Smith)
    3 mins 48 secs, 2023, USA, color, sound, 16mm

    A collaborative Dadaist/exquisite corpse film on the theme of waste by four members of the Harrisburg-based collective Moviate.
    Process: A found, expired 100’ roll of 16mm color negative film was split into four parts and photographed separately by each participant. Then each section was developed in a homemade b&w developer from the participant’s own compostable waste. The negative was then printed to 16mm color print stock on a makeshift DIY contact printer along with found optical sound. Lastly, it was assembled in the Dadaist poetry method by cutting the printed film into pieces, placing them into a large wooden box with holes, randomly pulling strips of film out through the holes one at a time and splicing them together in that order.

    Moviate is a filmmaker-run curatorial collective based in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

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    Pittsburgh Sound + Image


    Pittsburgh Sound + Image is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, formed in 2021 to create a film and video archive and cinema. Through preservation and exhibition, it is our mission to make local film history known and available to the public, alongside national and global artists who otherwise do not currently have outlets in Pittsburgh.

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    Saturday
    Nov.25
    Macau
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    • 牛房倉庫
      Ox Warehouse
      15 Rua do Volong,
      GF, 1F & 2F Gallery
      Macau

    PALIMPSEST



    This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the 16mm film format. This medium, since its inception, has always had an intimate connection with amateur, underground, and experimental film. Today, a century later, experimental film has become even more diverse, and approaches to the medium have become highly varied. Contemporary filmmakers and visual artists have continued to explore the limitless possibilities of film as a medium, while also adopting new media and methods that have sparked new directions.
    If we view the hundred-year history of experimental film as constantly transforming, then the endeavors in personal and poetic experimental film today can be seen as a type of palimpsest.[1] This screening program, titled Palimpsest, is a representative program that brings together a range of outstanding works shown at RPM Festival[2] in recent years, and presents the work of three generations of experimental film artists. Their medium and methods are the central elements that drive their experimentation with the moving image. In their distinctive films, clues and evocations emerge for audiences to interpret and contemplate.

    This section features a diverse range of experimental film production methods: Italian director Stefano P. Testa uses still images and collage to create the essay film Dear Monster; Canadian director Louise Bourque uses a classic small gauge film format, super8, to create a work based on family film footage; American director Monteith McCollum employs unconventional tools to produce a microcosm of the world by shooting the surface of postage stamps with an electron microscope; Lilan Yang’s innovative approach uses an inkjet printer to output images and then creates 16mm film works using a laser cutter; California artist Kate Lain produces photosensitive materials on blank 16mm film to create abstract films that reveal an environmental consciousness by processing film in streams and creeks; experimental filmmaker Xiao Zhang, who studied at the Beijing Film Academy in her early years, examines the family space and transforms it into a physical manifestation of memory; in Takahiro Suzuki's work, the artist reinterprets the communication between trees through low-frequency radio waves; artist Laura Kraning, who lives and works in the Rust Belt city of Buffalo, uses stop-motion animation to capture the rust marks of weathered steel, tracing time.

    Artists include: Louise Bourque, Laura Kraning, Kate Lain, Monteith McCollum, Takahiro Suzuki, Stefano P. Testa, Lilan Yang, Xiao Zhang

    The event is organized by Wenhua Shi, Benny Shaffer and Bianca LEI with Ox Warehouse Art Center, Macau.

    2cent / 10coil - Monteith Mccollum
    10mins, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, HD

    Water Mining (Eaton Canyon) - Kate Lain
    5mins10secs, 2021, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    electric moonlight & the language within the leaves - Takahiro Suzuki
    8mins, USA, 2023, B/W & color, sound , Super8 to HD

    A throwing forth - Xiao Zhang
    6mins, 2023, China/USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    Dear Monster - Stefano P. Testa
    15mins, 2023, Italy, Color, Sound, HD

    Bye Bye Now - Louise Bourque
    8mins27, 2022, Canada, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    Everything Comes Full Circle - Lilan Yang
    13mins44secs, 2022, USA, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm to HD

    de-composition - Laura Kraning
    2mins40secs, USA, 2023, color, sound , HD

    Total: 68 mins

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    [1] The term "palimpsest" originally refers to the parts of a written page that have been modified and corrected while retaining traces of the original text. [2] Revolutions per Minute festival, an artist-run festival, is dedicated to short-form poetic, personal, cinematic work in experimental, essay film, animation, documentary, video, and audiovisual performance. For more information, please visit https://revolutionsperminutefest.org

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    2cent / 10coil
    - Monteith McCollum

    10mins, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, HD
    Part science, part history, 2cent / 10coil is an exploration into the physical properties of a U.S. postage stamp and the anomalies it presents when subjected to the beam of an electron microscope. Integrated within, are the philosophical musings and speeches of a man in his last weeks of life on a quest entitled, “The Voyage of Understanding.”
    I like to say this subject found me. At the Analytic Diagnostics lab at Binghamton University I received training over many months culminating in access to a Scanning Electron Microscope. I was enamored with the unique possibilities the SEM offered despite its difficulties. I brought in a small stamp collection to give myself border limitations. The 1932 Harding stamp was the first to come to life. Using the SEM is a slow process, after sealing the stamp in the chamber and composing a shot there was only time for approximately 120 consecutive scans per session. This particular stamp reacted in a way the others hadn’t, fibers came to life and the ink danced. None of these images are animated with software. The mysterious movement stems from the scanning process itself and the build up of heat from the electrons rendering the object. – monteith mccollum

    Monteith McCollum is an interdisciplinary artist working across film, sound, performance, and sculpture, with a fascination with topics encompassing ecology, agriculture, urban mobility, and technology in sound. Both his experimental shorts and feature essay documentaries have frequently blended nonfiction and fiction moving between character and subject-driven concepts. Parallel with creating his own work he often has been commissioned to compose soundtracks for experimental and independent filmmakers. His live audio-visual performances and fixed media sound compositions interweave environmental field recordings with musical assemblages incorporating strings and modular synthesis. Feature documentaries and shorts have been exhibited and broadcast on PBS’s “POV” series as well as presented in museums such as MOMA’s New Directors / New Films, Wexner Center for the Arts, and The Hirschhorn. Film festivals have included South by Southwest, Slamdance, Hot Docs, IDFA, Osnabruck Intermedia Film Festival, The New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival, and San Francisco International Film Festival. In addition to screenings his work has received generous financial support from the New York Foundation for the Arts, NYSCA, Kodak, The Rockefeller Foundation, The National Endowment on the Arts, Iowa Arts Council, POV, and the Jerome Foundation.


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    Water Mining (Eaton Canyon) - Kate Lain
    5mins10secs, 2021, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    Water Mining (Eaton Canyon) is a nature document(ary) made *with* a stream, rather than about it. Its images come from a combination of cyanotype, a blue-and-white photographic process dating back to the 1840s, and actual plant material adhered to physical film. I hand-coated clear 16mm leader with cyanotype chemicals, then used sunlight to make photogram-style, cameraless exposures of plant matter I had gathered in and around the stream in Eaton Canyon. Cyanotypes are processed using water, and for this film, I used stream water that I had also collected from the canyon. I approached the film as though the stream, what was in it, its surroundings, the film, the chemicals, and I were all extensions of one another.

    Kate Lain is a Los Angeles–area multidisciplinary artist working in film, video, clay, and other media. Her experimental film and video work verges on documentary and spans a wide range—from essay film to stopmotion collage to impressionist portraiture. Her works have screened at festivals, microcinemas, museums, and other spaces across North America and Europe.

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    electric moonlight & the language within the leaves - Takahiro Suzuki
    8mins, USA, 2023, B/W & color, sound , Super8 to HD

    a modern re-telling of the japanese tale of the bamboo cutter and the moon princess. the moon princess listens to the untold intelligence of the cosmos as observed by the trees to become closer with and eventually return home.

    Takahiro Suzuki (he/him/his) is an artist currently residing in Portland, ME (USA). He completed his BA in Studio Art from the University of Virginia concentrating in the media of photography and cinematography, and received his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

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    Dear Monster - Stefano P. Testa
    15mins, 2023, Italy, Color, Sound, HD

    A fragmented collection of letters tells the story of Elio’s passage from adolescence to adulthood. Elio is a restless and disobedient Italian 18-year-old fellow who lives his youth between cheating and betrayals during the swinging 60s.
    “Dear Monster” is a collection of authentic documents. However, there are few historical and biographical references to the characters. Voices and handwriting are the only elements useful to draw the senders’ psychological profiles. The texts are read and interpreted by actors; the voices are inserted into sound environments, as if hypothetically present at the time of writing. The film develops visually through a slow overlap of symbolic and evocative images of the inner universe of the young Elio. Through the use of fade effects, the pages of the letters merge with photographs, magazine clippings and some amateur films of the time. The result is a stratification of worn-out textures and faded colours. “Dear Monster” is a backward journey in memories, in search of lost affections.

    Stefano P. Testa was born in 1988. He lives and works in Bergamo (Italy) as a camera operator, video editor, colorist and post-production technician. Since 2010 he has been collaborating with Lab 80 film in documentary films production and with Bergamo Film Meeting, in charge of the festival audiovisual communication.

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    A throwing forth - Xiao Zhang
    6mins, 2023, China/USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    A time remnant inhabits a personal space with a secret, private, unspoken word of one's being. Sliding planes of window and time, throwing drifts of the inner and the outer self, the film seeks in the interval of memory for a transitory reunion with my family.

    Xiao Zhang is an artist-filmmaker from China living in Los Angeles. She received her BFA at Beijing Film Academy in 2020 and currently holds an MFA in Film/Video at CalArts. Her practice centers on personal poetics which derives from cross-generation memory and diaristic approaches. It continues by employing methods drawn from handcrafted celluloid film and expanded cinema. Her work often offers a complex fluctuation between material reality and subjective experience.

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    Bye Bye Now - Louise Bourque
    8mins27, 2022, Canada, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    Waving hello to the filming cameraperson, the subjects through this very gesture, are also providing a future viewer with the acknowledgment of a constant good-bye to a fleeting moment. Yet when the film is projected and the captured gesture is seen, it's as if the subjects are saying hello again from the past. This film is an homage to the artist's father, the man behind the camera in these personal family archives.

    The filmmaker Louise Bourque recently moved back to Montréal after spending 30 years in the United States and elsewhere. Her films have been screened in more than forty-five countries and broadcast on PBS and the Sundance Channel in the US as well as on Télé-Québec in Canada and SBS in Australia. Her work has been presented by major galleries and museums worldwide, including the Musée de la Civilisation and the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec in Québec city, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

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    Everything Comes Full Circle - Lilan Yang
    13mins44secs, 2022, USA, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm to HD

    Following Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas (1984) filming locations from Houston, Texas to Los Angeles, California, I use a 16mm Bolex camera to capture the vastness of the American West. The footage draws me to reminisce about snippets of my everyday life. I contemplate how we perceive the world through analog optical apparatuses and how memories are multidimensional yet fragile. Our recollections of people and places can be distorted, unrecognizable, and fictitious. These memories would eventually diminish with the passing of time. Everything Comes Full Circle is a personal attempt to remember things that will soon be forgotten. The original footage was shot in Kodak 16mm film stocks during the summer of 2021 and edited digitally with voiceover. Later the digital moving images were inkjet printed on clear film spliced together with perforations cut out with a laser cutter. Each run of the projection makes the printer ink slowly melt, and the film will eventually fall into decay over the course of time.

    Lilan Yang is an artist and experimental filmmaker from Chongqing, China. Her practice explores the myth of cities and landscapes, ways of seeing and unseeing, and sentiments of remembering and forgetting, through lens-based analog media such as 16mm filmmaking and 35mm photography, as well as digital technologies such as machine learning and data visualization. She received a BS in Computer Engineering from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an MFA in Digital + Media from Rhode Island School of Design.

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    de-composition - Laura Kraning
    2mins40secs, USA, 2023, color, sound , HD

    A textural macro collage of a rust belt landscape- scratched, splattered, dripping, cracking, and bursting to the surface. Photographed and meticulously edited over one year in Buffalo, NY, the reverberant tones of the New York Central rail line provide the rhythmic pulse to a rapid cascade of multi-hued material decay and metallic de-composition.

    Laura Kraning’s moving image work navigates landscape as a repository for memory, cultural mythology, and the technological sublime. Exploring absence and the fluidity of time, she evokes liminal spaces of neither past, nor present, but a landscape of the imagination. Laura’s work has screened widely at international film festivals, such as New York, Rotterdam, London, Edinburgh, San Francisco, Ann Arbor, Antimatter, Visions du Réel, and Festival du Nouveau Cinema, among others. She is a recipient of the Princess Grace Foundation John H. Johnson Film Award, the Leon Speakers Award and Jury Awards at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, the Film House Award at the Athens International Film and Video Festival and the Jury Award for Short Film at Rencontres Internationales Sciences et Cinémas.

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    Ox Warehouse is a private and non-profit art association offering free admission exhibitions. It is an art space open to local artists and art associations for collaborative projects, making the venue an experimental platform for Macau’s artistic creation.

    The Ox Warehouse presents exhibitions and performances of contemporary art, trying to provide an alternative platform to the local arts scene. Being dedicated to the promotion of art, the Ox Warehouse also organizes inspirational artistic workshops, in order to foster individual creativity and the experimental spirit, as well as cross-border exchange programs.

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    實驗電影在今年是值得特別紀念,因為這是電影十六毫米膠片規格誕生100週年,這一媒介在誕生之際, 就與非專業/實驗視覺語言接下不解之緣。
    在一百年之後的今天,實驗電影與實驗影像更是豐富多彩,媒介也相當多元,實驗影像藝術家也是倍有才人出,新媒介觸發新方向,我們是否可以認為「媒介即影像,方式即記憶」。 如果把百年實驗影像歷史視為一段記憶,那麼今天的個體實驗影像的嘗試可以被視為Palimpsest。
    Palimpsest 原意是指書寫頁面上被修改更正的部分,並同時保留原文的印跡。這些「印跡」正成為一條條線索不斷給予觀眾解讀實驗影像的通道。

    《有關記憶》實驗影像放映單元是從轉速節的展映作品裡挑選出的代表節目,這是一場集結老中青三代實驗影像藝術家的盛宴。本單元裡呈現多元化的實驗影像生產方式: 既有Stefano P. Testa 使用靜格拼貼組合義大利短片作品「親愛的魔鬼」;也有加拿大導演 Louise Bourque 以經典小規格膠片運用超8電影家庭影像為素材的創作; 美國導演Monteith Mccollum使用非常規工具生產,用超精度顯微鏡拍攝硬幣表面微觀大千世界;才女 Lilan Yang 更有用油墨打印機輸出圖像,再用激光切割機自製16毫米膠片作品;美國加州藝術家 Kate Lain在空白16毫米膠片上自製感光材料,利用河流小溪沖洗的環保意識的「水跡」抽象電影;早年就讀於北京電影學院的實驗電影人 Xiao Zhang 審視家庭空間,將其轉換成記憶的實體;在 Takahiro Suzuki 作品中,作者遙想樹木間以低頻電波隔空交流;居住在鐵繡城市布法羅的藝術家 Laura Kraning 用定格動畫方式拍攝風化岩融下的鋼鐵鏽跡,也堪稱「歲月痕跡」。

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    Sept. 5 - Oct. 28, 2023
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    • Sept. 5 - Oct. 28, 2023
      University Hall Gallery
      UMass-Boston
      University Drive North
      Dorchester
      MA 02125

    ROOM TO BREATHE
    RPM EXHIBITION


    Public Reception: 9.29.23 from 5-7PM

    Artists include: Brit Bunkley, Heather Cassano, Abigail Hendrix, Jodie Mack, Kym McDaniel, Tess Martin, and Vito A. Rowlands

    This year's exhibition, titled Room to Breathe, was co-curated by Samuel Toabe, Director of University Hall Gallery, and Wenhua Shi, Associate Professor of Art and Art History. A total of seven video installations were juried from forty-seven submissions. The exhibition explores the possibility of the exhibition space to act as a site or a sanctuary for energizing, renewing, and meditating.

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    Dear Hart - How they dream. How we dream. - Brit Bunkley
    (2023, 3:38m loop, Sound, Color, Digital, New Zealand)

    M*U*S*H* - Jodie Mack
    (2022, 8m loop, Color, Silent, 16mm to Digital, UK/USA)

    Nimueh Triptych - Abigail Hendrix
    (2023, Three-channel 9:29m loop, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital, USA)

    Madness - Heather Cassano
    (2022, Three-channel 16m, 24m & 24m loop, Color, Sound, Digital, USA)

    Still Life with Woman, Tea and Letter - Tess Martin
    (2022, 2:14m loop, Color, Sound, Digital, Netherlands)

    Invisible World - Kym McDaniel
    (2022, 4:51m loop, Color, Sound, Digital, USA)

    Immaculate Generations no. 1 - Vito A. Rowlands
    (2022, 11m loop, Color, Sound, Digital, Belgium/USA)

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    Dear Hart - How they dream. How we dream.
    - Brit Bunkley

    (2023, 3:38m loop, Sound, Color, Digital, New Zealand)
    "Dear Hart, How they dream. How we dream" consists of animations of a hybrid Père David's deer combined with video footage where deer inhabit human space in a deep fake video of dreams.
    The Père David's deer is an unusual animal whose antlers grow like tree branches - a chimerical animal. “The species is sometimes known by its informal name, sì bú xiàng… literally meaning four not alike… or like none of the four...The hooves of a cow but not a cow.

    Brit Bunkley is a New Zealand-based artist and videographer whose practice includes the construction of large-scale outdoor sculpture and installations as well as the creation of ‘impossible’ moving and still images and architecture designed using 3D modeling, video editing, and image editing programs. Bunkley, an NZ/USA citizen, has also been a recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship and the Rome Prize Fellowship in the USA.

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    M*U*S*H* - Jodie Mack
    (2022, 8m loop, Color, Silent, 16mm to Digital, UK/USA)

    Vital grief finds interplanetary putrescence.

    Jodie Mack is an experimental animator. Her films unleash the kinetic energy of material remnants of domestic and institutional knowledge to illuminate the relationship between decoration and utility. Straddling the boundary between rigor and accessibility, her cinema questions how we ascribe value to things.

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    Nimueh Triptych - Abigail Hendrix
    (2023, Three-channel 9:29m loop, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital, USA)

    Nimueh is a hybrid 16mm and digital 3-channel installation that explores the mythologizing of the body after violence and death.

    Abigail Hendrix is a writer, photographer, and filmmaker based in Boston, MA. With a BA in anthropology from the University of Washington, Hendrix is currently pursuing an MFA in Film and Media Art at Emerson College with emphases on animation, experimental media, and ethnography. Hendrix has edited short documentaries and concert videos for Smithsonian Folklife, Smithsonian Folkways, and The Roadwork Center, and has written screenplays and non-fiction prose pieces for various publications such as Smithsonian Folklife.

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    Madness - Heather Cassano
    (2022, Three-channel 16m, 24m & 24m loop, Color, Sound, Digital, USA)

    MADNESS is a three-channel video installation featuring archival video, moving imagery from mental institution cemeteries, and text-on-screen detailing the number of graves present at each gravesite. The archival video is taken from a series of films produced in the early 1950s featuring Dr. Heinz Lehmann describing eight forms of "mental symptoms" as they appear in the mentally ill. Mental institutions and state school cemeteries exist in every state in the contiguous United States.

    Heather Cassano is a documentary film and media artist working at the intersection of observational and poetic documentary. Her work often frames narratives through her personal experiences, exploring the idea of “otherness” as it relates to mental health, disability, and established social norms. She has presented work in the form of documentary films, multi-channel video installations, and still photography.

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    Still Life with Woman, Tea and Letter - Tess Martin
    (2022, 2:14m loop, Color, Sound, Digital, Netherlands)

    A photograph is a window into the past, but sometimes the border between the past and the present is not entirely clear. This stop-motion animation invites us to think about our relationship to time by portraying one woman caught in the middle.

    Tess Martin is a filmmaker/visual artist based in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Her work is informed by hand-made animation techniques and their potential to explore the human condition. Persistent themes are our place in nature, our relationship to the past, and how memory and perception inform identity. She creates short films, interactive installations and paintings/prints.

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    Invisible World - Kym McDaniel
    (2022, 4:51m loop, Color, Sound, Digital, USA)

    To apply for an accessible or Crip parking placard, a doctor within the state must approve the application. As part of the application, there are six medical conditions which qualify a person for a placard. These conditions include: (1) cannot walk two hundred feet without stopping to rest; (2) cannot walk without the use of an assistance device; (3) is restricted by lung disease; (4) uses portable oxygen; (5) has a cardiac condition; (6) is severely limited in their ability to walk due to an arthritic, neurological, or orthopedic conditions. Many people with disabilities are included in these categories, and many are not.

    Kym McDaniel (she/her) is queer, invisibly disabled, experimental filmmaker, choreographer, and performer. She began working in video after a head injury changed her relationship to her body, dance, and choreography. She uses image collages, text, gesture, and the body to explore chronic illness, queerness/disability, and structural dissociation. She is an AmSAT Alexander Technique teacher and has an MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

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    Immaculate Generations no. 1 - Vito A. Rowlands
    (2022, 11m loop, Color, Sound, Digital, Belgium/USA)

    If the eyes are the window to the soul, "Immaculate Generations no. 1" presents its viewer with a singular look into thousands of souls. Equal parts Carl Sagan and William Blake, this flicker film is composed of tens of thousands of individual retinal photographs from public databases. Animated between 12 and 24 frames per second, they make for a dazzling rush into the maelstrom of life as we perceive it. Every retinal exposure is a galaxy, replete with its own sun, star-studded clouds, and light refracted through time and space.

    Vito A. Rowlands(Antwerp / 1986) is a Belgian filmmaker and scholar whose films have toured internationally. His feature script "Elvis, We Like Your Music," was a finalist at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival Development Track, and his short "Into the Silver Ether" (2020) was in competition at the Raindance, Brooklyn and HollyShorts film festivals. Vito has taught in Amsterdam, Brussels, and Copenhagen, as well as at Columbia University. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Experimental Film and Media at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, and a 16mm film instructor at Mono No Aware in Brooklyn.

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    Wednesday
    Sept. 27
    7PM
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    • Wednesday
      Sept. 27th, 7PM
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge MA
      617-876-6837
    RPM Solo Artist:
    Vincent Grenier

    While Revolved

    We are delighted to announce the upcoming mini retrospective program for solo artist Vincent Grenier at the Brattle Theatre in Cambridge on September 27th at 7pm. This event will showcase a total of 11 pieces spanning Grenier's impressive five-decade-long cinematic practice.

    The program will commence with Mend, an early piece shot on 16mm film in 1979, and will extend to his more recent creations, Moonrise (2022) and Wishbone (2021), which is in Grenier's signature style: the simple gestures of everyday life (Nicole Gingras, La revue de la Cinémathèque, Montréal). Throughout his career, Grenier has deeply explored the fundamental aspects of the moving image; light and shadows, stillness and movements, and durations.

    We sincerely hope you can join us for this event honoring the exceptional contribution of Vincent Grenier to experimental cinema.

    Tabula Rasa
    Orig: 16 mm. 1993-2004, originally edited on DV, Video, 7:30 min. color, sound.
    Re-scanned to FHD /2K format 8-20-2018


    Mend
    Orig: 16mm, 1979, 5 min. b&w / silent.

    Time’s Wake
    Orig: 16mm, 1987, 12 min. color/B&W, silent.

    Tremors
    16mm, 1984, 13 min. color, sound.

    You
    Orig: 16mm, 1990 (revised 2014), 11:45 min. color, sound.

    Surface Tension
    Orig: 16 mm, 1995, 4.5 min. color, mono.

    Color Study
    Orig: Mini DV, 2000, 4:30 min. color, stereo.

    Wishbone
    HD Cinema (4:3), 2021, 1:10 min. color, stereo.

    Moonrise
    HD Video, 2022, 4:40 min. B&W, sound.

    Commute
    HD Cinema (4:3), 2018, 6:10 min. color, stereo.

    While Revolved
    (Orig 16mm, 1976, 18fps silent) HD Digital, 2022, 9:22 min. color, sound.


    Screening format: DCP
    total: 71 mins

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    Vincent Grenier is a native of Quebec City, Canada. He has lived largely in the US, mostly New York City and upstate New York. In spite of this, he was a frequent contributor to the Montreal art scene of the 70’s and 80’s and the San Francisco bay areas where he received an MFA at the San Francisco Art Institute in the early 70's.
    Grenier's experimental films and videos have earned numerous awards and have shown in North America, Europe and China at major museums, showcases and festivals.
    Grenier has made over two dozens films and since 1990 as many videos. His work was the subject of retrospectives at Media City film Festival, Windsor, Ontario and Images Film & Video Festival's Canadian Images Spotlight, in Toronto.
    One of his video, Tabula Rasa, was screened in the “Best Avant Garde Films & Videos of the Decade” (2000-2010) program at the Lincoln Center, NYC and his recent work Watercolor received the Stellar award for Experimental Works at the Black Maria Film & Video Festival and the First Prize, experimental category, at the Athens Film Festival, Ohio.
    For many years one of his video has screened each year at Views from the Avant Garde section of the New York Film Festival.
    He has received a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in 2010 and the Stan Brakhage Vision Award in 2019. He lives in Ithaca NY and teaches at nearby Binghamton University.

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    Tabula Rasa
    Orig: 16 mm. 1993-2004, originally edited on DV, Video, 7:30 min. color, sound.
    Re-scanned to FHD /2K format 8-20-2018

    Filmed in a South Bronx high-school, Tabula Rasa attempts through sound image juxtapositions, digital manipulation and layering to deal at once with the propensity to mislead and eloquence of the recorded image. The ambiguous qualities of appearances, so assiduously cultivated by institutions, the motivations found in the clues that tells the history of objects, colors, textures, architecture and ultimately, psychological states of mind are but some of the players in this poetic and cultural happening.

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    Mend
    Orig: 16mm, 1979, 5 min. b&w / silent.

    Is it happening in the screening room or on the screen; in a snowstorm or inside; what isn't surrounding and what is? From filming Ann sewing, on a grey winter day.

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    Time’s Wake
    Orig: 16mm, 1987, 12 min. color/B&W, silent.

    A collection of 'windows' on a personal past, TIME'S WAKE (once removed) is made from home movie and other types of footage I collected through the years when I went back to visit my parents at l'Ile d'Orléans, Québec. Through the use of the double exposure, fragmentation, motion and stillness are linked with memory. -VG.

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    Tremors
    16mm, 1984, 13 min. color, sound.

    Tall buildings and cars are filmed through the Kinemacolor process, variable color filters and a water lens. Sturdiness jousts with fragility, past with present, alienation with tenderness, abrasiveness with sensuality, red with green. (The Kinemacolor process was used in 19l5 to obtain fairly illusionistic colors from black and white films by filming and projecting them through synchronized, red and green filters.) -VG.

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    YOU
    Orig: 16mm, 1990 (revised 2014), 11:45 min. color, sound.

    No I? Should separate worlds be mixed? Knowing what one wants. The absurd and the hurt. Images for what you did.

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    Surface Tension
    Orig: 16 mm, 1995, 4.5 min. color, mono.

    This film was shot in color but using the Kinemacolor process, a process which was used in 1915 to obtain fairly illusionistic colors from black and white films by filming and projecting them through synchronized red and green filters.

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    Color Study
    Orig: Mini DV, 2000, 4:30 min. color, stereo.

    “It is interesting to think about Color Study in relation to the purely cinematic-photochemical nature of a work like Kurt Kren’s Asyl with its multiplicity of delicate composite imagery and overlapping seasons that create a feeling of all time being simultaneous. In Asyl, solar light cohabitates with the film - the emulsion receives singes and burns that inscribe the image and are reconstituted in projection as muted radiance. In Color Study, a cat’s eye like chatoyancy of splattered color, the precise mimicry of natural color combined with unnatural color fields, creates and breaks illusion. Color manufactures a kind of implied time lapse where it does not technically exist. A spatial jigsaw, combining the autumnal and the verdant. The invented light and color of the digital process creating an acid wash.” -- Mark McElhatten

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    Wishbone
    HD Cinema (4:3), 2021, 1:10 min. color, stereo.

    The basis of Wishbone is a still life on a tabletop near a window. In addition to a small figurine of a Buddha-like weightlifter, and a nondescript glass prism, the composition is anchored by the titular wishbone. It is situated inside two different drinking glasses, its branches contained as it tapers into a juncture that hovers between both containers. But this still life doesn't remain still for long. Grenier overlays the tabletop with a flowing river, complete with a rower in a tiny kayak.
    – Michael Sicinski

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    Moonrise
    HD Video, 2022, 4:40 min. B&W, sound.

    A wild montage of everyday sounds that impersonate rain drops, anthropomorphize eyeballs floaters.

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    COMMUTE
    HD Cinema (4:3), 2018, 6:10 min. color, stereo.

    Distinct fields on the same screen, foreground each other, invite comparisons, between different times and spaces, and the constructed and natural processes that inescapably defines us thru textures and emotional spaces. Commute does refer to regular travels between one place and an other, but also to substitutions, and exchanges.

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    While Revolved
    (Orig 16mm, 1976, 18fps silent) HD Digital, 2022, 9:22 min. color, sound.

    Restored version with soundtrack by Etienne Grenier An elusive film that highlights, in a series of movements, the magnified chemical soup of the emulsion as the camera lens is trained on both a closely foregrounded granular surface and a complex set of sinking, rising and emerging spaces behind it, subtly shaped by the focusing abilities of shadows. Sound introduce other layers and ideas about movement and space bringing new understandings and articulations to this sculpture like cinema.

    Thursday
    Sept. 28
    7PM
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    Thursday
    Sept. 28th, 7PM
    Goethe-Institut Boston
    170 Beacon Street
    Boston, MA 02116

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    Program 01
    Illuminations


    Rhythm 23(Rhythmus 23)
    Hans Richter
    3mins, 1923, Germany, B/W, sound, 16mm (prints from the Film-makers' Coop)
    RED HOUSE
    Barry Doupé
    3mins, 2022, Canada, color, sound, digital
    Just Untitled
    Alessandra Vorontsova
    2mins, 2023, USA, color/B&W, sound, 16mm to HD
    Under the Midnight Sun
    Mélissa Faivre
    9mins52secs, 2022, France, B/W, Sound, HD
    Like a Lighthouse
    Richard Tuohy
    12mins, 2023, Australia, color, sound, 16mm
    Grain Cloud Atmosphere
    Martin Moolhuijsen
    6mins38secs, 2023, Germany, color, sound, 35mm to HD
    Arcalis
    Youjin Moon
    12mins58secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, digital
    Parts
    Michael Lyons
    4mins47secs, 2023, Japan, B/W, silent, 16mm to HD
    Water Mining (Eaton Canyon)
    Kate Lain
    5mins10secs, 2021, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD
    In the Wind
    Yue Hua
    5mins36secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD
    Potemkin Piece
    Justin Clifford Rhody
    1min35secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 35mm to 4K

    total: 73 mins

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    Rhythm 23 (Rhythmus 23)
    Hans Richter
    3mins, 1923, Germany, B/W, silent, 16mm

    "More complex than RHYTHM 21, the film is nonetheless a logical extent of Richter's conviction that film is modern art. Again, the orchestration of basic geometric forms according to precise rhythmical ...

    Hans Richter was a German abstract painter, filmmaker and avant-gardist. He was a member of the Dada art movement and created one of the early and influential examples of abstract film, Rhythmus 21.

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    RED HOUSE
    Barry Doupé
    3mins, 2022, Canada, color, sound, digital

    RED HOUSE is an animation that playfully explores metamorphosis in relation to the stability and structure of housing. Created using the AMIGA computer console and Deluxe Paint IV software, hand drawn sequences delight in the constant reconfiguration of images, characters and forms.

    Barry Doupé (b. 1982 Victoria, BC) is a Vancouver based artist primarily working with computer animation. His films use imagery and language derived from the subconscious; developed through writing exercises and automatic drawing. His films have been screened throughout Canada and Internationally including the Ann Arbor Film Festival (Ann Arbor, Michigan), International Film Festival Rotterdam (Rotterdam, the Netherlands), Anthology Film Archives (NY, New York), Lyon Contemporary Art Museum (Lyon, France), Pleasure Dome (Toronto, ON), MOCCA (Toronto, ON), Whitechapel Gallery (London, UK), Centre Pompidou (Paris, France), the Vancouver Art Gallery (Vancouver, BC), and the Tate Modern (London, UK).

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    Just Untitled
    Alessandra Vorontsova
    2mins, 2023, USA, color/B&W, sound, 16mm to HD

    16mm cameraless handmade film. The soundtrack is the materials used to create this film.

    Alessandra Vorontsova is a multidisciplinary artist mainly working in stills, film and installation pieces. Analog and digital methods are often used to pose questions about the way we do things and why. The work seeks to be a source of contemplation of media consumption in current times.

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    Under the Midnight Sun
    Mélissa Faivre
    9mins52secs, 2022, France, B/W, Sound, HD

    "Under the Midnight Sun" is a dance of light and shadows, textured grayscale expanding across the landscape of an apocalyptic city. The sun is moon and light. It unveils itself by means of visual pulsating dynamics, unstable frequencies and vibrating rhythms; until it disintegrates into particles and pixels, and vanishes into darkness. This visual-musical piece is dark, worrying and calls to sensorial explorations into deeper energies.

    Mélissa Faivre, born 1989 in France, is an experimental video artist based in Berlin. Her rhythmic and mesmerizing work seeks to provoke questions on the nature of perception. The images she creates present blended and distorted realities that test the temporal and spatial coordinates foundational to the perceptive experience. Working only in digital format, her practice often pushes the aesthetic boundaries between film and video.

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    Like a Lighthouse
    Richard Tuohy
    12mins, 2023, Australia, color, sound, 16mm

    A blinding beam of light. The piercing sound of ships. Everything - the land, plants, the sky - shouts for attention. Perceptions assail us with their demands to be noticed.

    Richard Tuohy is one of the most active experimental film artists currently working on celluloid in Australia. His film IRON-WOOD won first prize (ex aequo) at Abstracta 2009 experimental film festival in Rome. He runs Nanolab in Australia – the specialist small gauge film processing laboratory. He actively encourages other artists to work with cine film through his Artist Film Workshop initiative (see artistfilmworkshop.org). He is also a founding director of the Australian International Experimental Film Festival.

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    Grain Cloud Atmosphere
    Martin Moolhuijsen
    6mins38secs, 2023, Germany, color, sound, 35mm to HD

    Many grains make a cloud. many clouds form an atmosphere.
    120 meters of handpainted 35mm film were digitized as single pictures and fed into a self developed editing software that shuffles the individual images according to certain parameters such as painterly technique and color. the film is the result of one hour of improvisation with that software. grain cloud atmosphere explores the perception of time through the eye and through the ear.

    martin moolhuijsen is an italian intermedia artist based in berlin. his work is situated at the threshold of sound art, experimental film and experimental poetry and has taken the form of installations, fixed-media pieces, conceptual artworks, poems, signs, films and of any combination of the aforementioned. his work has been presented at akademie der künste, deutschlandfunk kultur, ZKM – zentrum für kunst und medien and CTM vorspiel among others. he is a member of the analog film lab LaborBerlin

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    Arcalis
    Youjin Moon
    12mins58secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, digital

    A cosmic panorama of dazzling silver forms and specks of light unfolds, conjuring a utopian vision. The viewer is led on a quest for paradise in shades of green and fantasies of unknown space.

    Youjin Moon is a South Korean artist based in Boston. Moon has shown her work at national and international film festivals and exhibitions, including the deCordova New England Biennial, the 56th Ann Arbor Film Festival, Hamburg International Short Film Festival, and the Biennial of the Moving Image, Buenos Aires. Moon received the Korean EXiS Award at the 12th and 16th Seoul International Experimental Film and Video Festival. Her works have been featured in the Boston Globe and Art New England, among others.

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    Parts
    Michael Lyons
    4mins47secs, 2023, Japan, B/W, silent, 16mm to HD

    This camera-less silent film examines parts and wholes. Electronic components were photogrammed on 16mm print stock. Displacements in time and space assemble the parts into an abstract dynamic gestalt.

    Michael Lyons is a researcher and artist based in Kyoto, Japan.

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    Water Mining (Eaton Canyon)
    Kate Lain
    5mins10secs, 2021, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    Water Mining (Eaton Canyon) is a nature document(ary) made *with* a stream, rather than about it. Its images come from a combination of cyanotype, a blue-and-white photographic process dating back to the 1840s, and actual plant material adhered to physical film. I hand-coated clear 16mm leader with cyanotype chemicals, then used sunlight to make photogram-style, cameraless exposures of plant matter I had gathered in and around the stream in Eaton Canyon. Cyanotypes are processed using water, and for this film, I used stream water that I had also collected from the canyon. I approached the film as though the stream, what was in it, its surroundings, the film, the chemicals, and I were all extensions of one another.

    Kate Lain is a Los Angeles–area multidisciplinary artist working in film, video, clay, and other media. Her experimental film and video work verges on documentary and spans a wide range—from essay film to stopmotion collage to impressionist portraiture. Her works have screened at festivals, microcinemas, museums, and other spaces across North America and Europe.

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    In the Wind
    Yue Hua
    5mins36secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    “In the wind” is a thought experiment on Found footage attempts to decipher myself and my experience of the physical world around me. By linking my senses through sound and images, I establish my connection to this diverse and ever-changing world. Walking In the wind is also a state that I try to maintain in the post-epidemic era, a state of confronting the world and maintaining myself - "everything happens, dissipates in the wind, and I observe, experience, feel, and keep walking.

    Yue Hua/华越 is an emerging artist and filmmaker based in Boston, focusing on visual storytelling and intermedia artwork. She loves using celluloid films to explore themes of the female, identity, spiritual and physical world. She holds a BFA from the China Academy of Art and is currently completing an MFA in Film and Media Art at Emerson College.

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    Potemkin Piece
    Justin Clifford Rhody
    1min35secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 35mm to 4K

    A collaborative deconstruction/destruction of a Battleship Potemkin 35mm trailer created through the mail during lockdown with nearly 100 participants. Each person was sent half-second long strips of the film to manipulate as they saw fit. Once returned, they were spliced together in a new sequence creating a chance-driven score from the optical soundtrack. A messy and exciting experiment in montage and cut up techniques made by a diverse cast including found footage maestro Craig Baldwin and my high school girlfriend.

    Justin Clifford Rhody (b. 1984, Flint Michigan) is a fine art photographer, filmmaker and sound artist based in Santa Fe, New Mexico.




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    Thursday
    Sept. 28
    9PM
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    Thursday
    Sept. 28th, 9PM
    Goethe-Institut Boston
    170 Beacon Street
    Boston, MA 02116

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    Program 02
    RECOLLECTIONS


    A Companion for Amateur Cinematographers: Vol. I
    Federico Di Corato
    20mins, 2022, Italy, B/W & Color, sound, HD
    Golden Headacher
    Niina Suominen
    17mins, 2022, Finland, color, sound, digital
    Broadcasting from home
    Mariano Ramis
    3mins, 2022, Argentina, color, sound, HD
    The Winter of Eternity
    Patrick Müller
    8mins10secs, 2022, Germany, Color, Sound, Super8 to HD
    The End of the World
    Ali Aschman
    3mins, 2023, UK, color, sound, Digital & 16mm to HD
    Postlude
    Roger Deutsch
    6mins, Hungary, 2023, color, sound , 8mm & 16mm to HD
    Khorosho
    Dominic Angerame
    3mins23secs, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm to HD
    Tarantula
    Tomás Orrego
    3mins20secs, 2023, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm to HD
    White Shoes
    Simone Bethancourt
    6mins30secs, USA, 2022, color, sound , 8mm & HD to HD total: 71 mins

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    A Companion for Amateur Cinematographers: Vol. I
    Federico Di Corato
    20mins, 2022, Italy, B/W & Color, sound, HD

    Set against the backdrop of Italy in the years of the fascist dictatorship, a man of means, yet unknown to history, scrutinises the world through his small cine camera. Guiding him and teaching him is a manual; the buds of ideology are detectable beneath the seemingly impartial tone it uses to describe technique. But in his films, the ineffable signs of resistance still rise to the surface.

    Production Companies: Enece Film, Lab 80 Film Made with: Footage from the Augusto Gandini Collection (Archivio Cinescatti – Lab 80 Film) Development supported by: Re-framing Home Movies, Vidéadoc

    Born in Andria in 1991, he lives in Milan. He graduated from the Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti (NABA), where he now teaches film editing. He is one of the founding partners of the Re-framing Home Movies association, which works to safeguard and promote amateur film heritage. He has directed three short films. “The Shack” and “(s)words” both explore the theme of private memory, through the aesthetic of video tape devices; both were presented in competition at the Locarno Film Festival. “A Companion for Amateur Cinematographers: Vol. I” is the result of his research into Fascist-era manuals for amateur cine enthusiasts; it was presented in competition at the Venice Film Festival.

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    Golden Headacher
    Niina Suominen
    17mins, 2022, Finland, color, sound, digital

    An experimental animation documentary about women’s hate and aggression and the culturally sanctioned ways to express or suppress these uneasy feelings. The film was created by animating textile and décor waste and beautiful glossy pictures of children that were popular in Scandinavia in the last century. The work brings to the fore the irritation and exhaustion felt by women and the thoughts often left unsaid outside the walls of home, as well as reflecting on the remorse and the shame felt after the bursts of anger.

    Niina Suominen graduated from the Arts Academy at Turku in 2004. She also has an education of a blacksmith, animal nurse and a forest worker. She works as a film director and media artist using traditional animation techniques requiring hand-work. Her works have been shown widely at the festivals both in Finland and abroad. She lives and works in Southwest Finland.

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    Broadcasting from home
    Mariano Ramis
    3mins, 2022, Argentina, color, sound, HD

    Broadcasting from home, was created while reflecting about the perplexity of loss and the human desire to communicate with the afterlife.
    The video was manufactured using frame-by-frame analog transfer technique and digital post-production.

    Born in San Pedro, Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1979.
    Mariano Ramis is an Image and Sound Designer from the Faculty of Architecture and Design of the Universidad de Buenos Aires, preparing thesis on video montage through Artificial Intelligence. As an artist he specializes in frame by frame experimentation on moving image recording, mixed image transfer techniques and music. His work has been exhibited in festivals, museums and salons in Argentina, America and Europe.

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    The Winter of Eternity
    Patrick Müller
    8mins10secs, 2022, Germany, Color, Sound, Super8 to HD

    What's the meaning of life? How do I find my way? In his existential philosophy work CITADELLE, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry posthumously gives us uncomfortable answers.
    A few years ago I visited the citadel on the island of Gozo and immediately remembered Antoine de St. Exupéry's posthumously published existential philosophy work CITADELLE. I had read the text fifteen years ago and, because of its radical nature and mysterious beauty, I never forgot one passage in particular that dealt with the meaning of life. I took my Super 8 camera and filmed my associations. The soundtrack finally succeeded in 2022: Valérie Hendrich spoke the text and four young musicians based in Chemnitz, Germany, composed the music (In 2023 they even won the first prize at "Jugend musiziert" festival in Berlin for their score).

    Patrick Müller, born in 1981 in Frankenberg, GDR, has made more than 40 short films, primarily with 8 and 16mm film, seeking to explore poetry within moving images. His experimental works have screened at numerous film festivals around the world and won several awards.

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    The End of the World
    Ali Aschman
    3mins, 2023, UK, color, sound, Digital & 16mm to HD

    How do we relate to the concept of climate catastrophe on a personal level? The filmmaker draws a parallel between various threats of climate change and her own visceral and emotional experience of grieving after an immense and sudden loss, questioning her capacity to care about humanity yet nonetheless showing a glimmer of hope for the future.

    Ali Aschman is a London-based artist from South Africa and the United States, making experimental animated short films. Her work has been exhibited in numerous galleries in the US and screened at festivals worldwide. She has studied at the University of Cape Town, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Royal College of Art. She is the Pathway Leader for Animation & Film at Cambridge School of Visual and Performing Arts.

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    Postlude
    Roger Deutsch
    6mins, Hungary, 2023, color, sound , 8mm & 16mm to HD

    "Would I lie to you? All I do is dream of you."
    "Don't"

    Roger Deutsch is an American who lives in Hungary. He entered the realm of film 40 years ago as the producer of the punk classic “Blank Generation” featuring Richard Hell and the Voidoids.

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    Khorosho
    Dominic Angerame
    3mins23secs, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm to HD

    In June 1999 dear friends Agnetta Falk and Jack Hirschman were married at Matt Gonzales' place in the Mission. I was there with my 16mm Bolex and filmed part of the ceremony and crowd. After almost 30 years I finally made this footage into a finished film. It features many of our dear friends both living and deceased. In honor of Jack and Aggie's wedding anniversary I finished the film over the weekend.

    Dominic Angerame's works search for unfamiliar views of seemingly familiar things: cities, landscapes, faces, and bodies. The filmmaker's desire to make everyday images "strange" at the editing table, to learn to see them fresh and to estrange them from our senses, makes his films seem-in all the different social realities they contain-always distanced as well, as if they led to another world beyond the concrete, beyond time and defined space. In Angerame's films, which pay homage to films from early cinema and the classic avant garde to American underground films of the 1960s and 70s and non-narrative films of the present day, an amazingly comprehensive history of the "visionary" moving image is always present. It may be that precisely his refusal to adopt a signature style has diminished the immediate influence of Angerame's films; however, Angerame's decision to work "universally," not to be swayed by considerations of the art market, and to experiment with very different styles increases the pedagogical worth of his films. It's not surprising to learn that Angerame, born in 1949, teaches at several American schools in addition to having served as the executive director of the American avant garde distribution center Canyon Cinema from 1980 to 2012.

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    Tarantula
    Tomás Orrego
    3mins20secs, 2023, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm to HD

    When hungry, the black gloved tarantula crawls out of its crypt to feed. The pale flesh of innocent bodies it takes into dark corners to ejaculate.

    Tomás Orrego (Lima 1991) is a filmmaker, designer, visual artist, and musician with studies in architecture. Through digital animation, sound design and video installation, his work embraces the drowsy consciousness of dreams.

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    White Shoes
    Simone Bethancourt
    6mins30secs, USA, 2022, color, sound , 8mm & HD to HD

    A memory told from the perspective of a little girl meeting her father for the first time, and the gift he gives her before disappearing.

    Simone Bethancourt graduated from the Calarts in 2022. White shoes is her thesis project.




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    Friday
    Sept.29
    6PM
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    Friday
    Sept. 29th, 6PM
    University Hall 2300
    University Hall
    UMass-Boston (JFK/UMass)
    University Drive North
    Boston (Dorchester)
    MA 02125

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    Program 03
    DECOMPOSITION


    “And when I die let me be buried in a Hemlock coffin, so I’ll go through hell snapping.”
    Sarah Ema Friedland
    7mins54secs, 2022, USA, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm&HD to HD
    Sea of Sighs
    J.M. Martínez
    5mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, 18fps, Super8 to HD
    Salute to the Sun
    Darko Masnec
    8mins50secs, 2022, Croatia, Color, Sound, HD
    Radiant Forms
    Ryan Marino
    7mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD
    Exaggerations
    Charles de Agustin
    20mins, 2022, UK&USA, color, sound, digital
    Konstantin
    Hogan Seidel
    3mins, USA, 2023, B/W & color, sound , 16mm to HD
    Ill Composto
    Moviate (Josh Drake, James Hollenbaugh, Jeremy Moss, Caleb Smith)
    3mins38secs, 2023, USA, color, sound, 16mm
    electric moonlight & the language within the leaves
    Takahiro Suzuki
    8mins, USA, 2023, B/W & color, sound , Super8 to HD
    de-composition
    Laura Kraning
    2mins40secs, USA, 2023, color, sound , HD

    total: 74 mins

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    “And when I die let me be buried in a Hemlock coffin, so I’ll go through hell snapping.”
    Sarah Ema Friedland
    7mins54secs, 2022, USA, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm&HD to HD

    Combining fantastical hand-painted and computer animations with 16mm film, a Hemlock forest in Western Massachusetts that is dying due to beetle infestation tells a larger story about climate collapse and the interconnections between the natural and the built environments.

    Sarah Ema Friedland received her BA from Sarah Lawrence College and the International School of Film and Television in Cuba and her MFA from the Integrated Media Art Program at Hunter College.
    Friedland’s works have been supported by grants and fellowships from the Jerome Foundation, the Paul Newman Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Palestine American Research Center, the LABA House of Study, and the MacDowell Colony.Friedland is a member of the Meerkat Media Collective and the Director of the MDOCS Storyteller’s Institute at Skidmore College.

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    Sea of Sighs
    J.M. Martínez
    5mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, 18fps, Super8 to HD

    Oceanic patterns come in waves of chroma blurs and ultraviolet light, illuminating marine life in states of change.
    Washed-up pieces of bleached coral, urchins, and abalone enter tide pools offering evidence of acidification in the warming waters of the Pacific Ocean. Imagery and color were manipulated with found sea glass and diachronic glass. The sound was made with hydrophones placed inside tide pools, within layers of sea foam, and the surrounding waters capturing the sounds of whales, sonar, container ships, cruise ships, and mining. An ocean soundscape of increasing noise.

    J.M. Martínez is an artist based in the Santa Cruz Mountains of California working with photography, film, video, and sculpture. His work utilizes the properties of light with the intention of abstracted visions and biomorphic forms that reveal the evolving landscape. Works of his have been exhibited at SFMoMA, CROSSROADS, Chicago Underground, Festival ECRÃ, EXiS, Crater-Lab, Cámara Lúcida, Antimatter, and the San Francisco Cinematheque.

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    Salute to the Sun
    Darko Masnec
    8mins50secs, 2022, Croatia, Color, Sound, HD

    An astronaut in love orbits around the sun absorbing its energy. But the sun is too big, causing their connection to break, and the astronaut must continue on his own. As he tries to return to his source of energy, he realizes there are others like him. What started out as a game, slowly turns into a love triangle. Shapes change, but their needs remain the same.

    Darko Masnec (1985, Celje) graduated from the Faculty of Education (Department of Visual Arts) in Maribor in 2009 and in 2012 completed his MA studies at the Academy of Fine Arts in Zagreb, Department of Animation and New Media. In 2017 he obtained a PhD degree from the Academy of Fine Arts in Zagreb with the thesis “The Zagreb School of Animated Film: Art and Market Practices in the Context of Videogames”. He has worked as an animator on a few short animated film projects and published several articles on the topic of animation and videogames. He regularly cooperates with Animafest and other festivals. He currently works as an assistant professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Zagreb.

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    Radiant Forms
    Ryan Marino
    7mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm

    Luminous forms merging in time.

    Ryan Marino is an interdisciplinary artist working with film, sound, and collage. His 16mm films explore the ethereality of time, light, and space. His 16mm films have screened at film festivals and venues including: Anthology Film Archives, New York Film Festival, San Francisco International Film Festival, Milwaukee Underground Film Festival, Uplink (Tokyo), Venice Biennale, Fracto Experimental Film Encounter, Spectacle Theater,​ and Pacific Film Archive. In addition to creating the soundtracks for his own films, his sound work includes original compositions and commissioned soundtracks for short films and theater productions. By day he works as an audiovisual archivist.

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    Konstantin
    Hogan Seidel
    3mins, USA, 2023, B/W & color, sound , 16mm to HD

    Konstantin is an experimental film shot on high-contrast black and white 16mm film using a single 100ft reel. The film is an in-camera edit with triple exposures, creating a layered and complex visual language. Through this aesthetic, the piece explores themes of queer love and queer ecology. It invites the viewer to enter a unique and poetic world, where the boundaries between the human and natural realms blur and merge. Pushing against human exceptionalism & into a world where there is no ‘natural’ or ‘unnatural.’
    Can a walk in the forest, a kiss between lovers, a roll of film, the touch lichen, liberate ourselves from these hierarchies?

    Born and raised in the American South, Hogan Seidel is an interdisciplinary artist with a creative presence in Boston and Seattle. Their moving image art has been featured in prestigious festivals, including Alchemy, Analogica, Onion City, and Istanbul Experimental. Their work has been shown at museums and galleries such as the Belvedere Contemporary Art Museum, The Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Boston Center for the Arts, Cyber Arts New Media Gallery, Fountain Street Gallery, and the Clemente. Hogan has received funding and support for their work from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, Collective Futures, and the United States Artists Grant. They are a recent alum of the Studios at MASS MoCA Artist Residency.

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    Ill Composto
    Moviate (Josh Drake, James Hollenbaugh, Jeremy Moss, Caleb Smith)
    3mins38secs, 2023, USA, color, sound, 16mm

    A collaborative Dadaist/exquisite corpse film on the theme of waste by four members of the Harrisburg-based collective Moviate.
    Process: A found, expired 100’ roll of 16mm color negative film was split into four parts and photographed separately by each participant. Then each section was developed in a homemade b&w developer from the participant’s own compostable waste. The negative was then printed to 16mm color print stock on a makeshift DIY contact printer along with found optical sound. Lastly, it was assembled in the Dadaist poetry method by cutting the printed film into pieces, placing them into a large wooden box with holes, randomly pulling strips of film out through the holes one at a time and splicing them together in that order.

    Moviate is a filmmaker-run curatorial collective based in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

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    Exaggerations
    Charles de Agustin
    20mins, 2022, UK&USA, color, sound, digital

    A supernatural road trip in the Scottish village of Foyers, the American hamlet of Grovers Mill, and reading breaks in an Amsterdam film library. We try to pick at belief and clarity. Difficulties between loving your work, working at loving, making a living. Language piles up, crashes down, and maybe becomes something else.

    Charles de Agustin is an artist primarily making films, performances, and texts which playfully scavenge in the ruins of critique and complicity. Influenced by essay/diary cinema traditions, de Agustin finds value in making a caricature out of the didactic, working toward better questions about the insidious forms of violence that impact our attempts at leading ethical lives.

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    electric moonlight & the language within the leaves
    Takahiro Suzuki
    8mins, USA, 2023, B/W & color, sound , Super8 to HD

    a modern re-telling of the japanese tale of the bamboo cutter and the moon princess. the moon princess listens to the untold intelligence of the cosmos as observed by the trees to become closer with and eventually return home.

    Takahiro Suzuki (he/him/his) is an artist currently residing in Portland, ME (USA). He completed his BA in Studio Art from the University of Virginia concentrating in the media of photography and cinematography, and received his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

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    de-composition
    Laura Kraning
    2mins40secs, USA, 2023, color, sound , HD

    A textural macro collage of a rust belt landscape- scratched, splattered, dripping, cracking, and bursting to the surface. Photographed and meticulously edited over one year in Buffalo, NY, the reverberant tones of the New York Central rail line provide the rhythmic pulse to a rapid cascade of multi-hued material decay and metallic de-composition.

    Laura Kraning’s moving image work navigates landscape as a repository for memory, cultural mythology, and the technological sublime. Exploring absence and the fluidity of time, she evokes liminal spaces of neither past, nor present, but a landscape of the imagination. Laura’s work has screened widely at international film festivals, such as New York, Rotterdam, London, Edinburgh, San Francisco, Ann Arbor, Antimatter, Visions du Réel, and Festival du Nouveau Cinema, among others. She is a recipient of the Princess Grace Foundation John H. Johnson Film Award, the Leon Speakers Award and Jury Awards at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, the Film House Award at the Athens International Film and Video Festival and the Jury Award for Short Film at Rencontres Internationales Sciences et Cinémas.




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    Friday
    Sept.29
    8PM
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    Friday
    Sept. 29th, 8PM
    University Hall 2300
    University Hall
    UMass-Boston (JFK/UMass)
    University Drive North
    Boston (Dorchester)
    MA 02125

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    Program 04
    Bodies in Motion


    Three Approaches
    Ethan Osman
    4mins48secs, 2022, USA, Color, sound, digital
    Virtual Spectres
    Sarah Boo
    5mins12secs, 2022, Canada, color, sound, HD
    Busy
    Jan Otto Ertesvåg
    6mins52secs, 2021, Norway, color, sound, HD
    Two Boys and a Dream
    Casey Carter
    20mins45secs, 2023, USA, Color, Sound, HD&16mm to HD
    Three Pride Flags
    Tom Bessoir
    2mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, digital
    The Only Photograph of Emily Dickinson, American Poet
    Dennis Tupicoff
    7mins43secs, Australia, 2023, color, sound , digital
    Site of Passage
    Lucy Kerr
    7mins, 2023, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD
    Endearing Insanity
    Poyen Wang
    8mins36secs, 2022, USA, Color, sound, digital
    Bodies #1: Milwaukee Waters
    Michelle Trujillo
    5mins5secs, USA, 2022, B/W , sound , 16mm to HD

    total: 68 mins

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    Three Approaches
    Ethan Osman
    4mins48secs, 2022, USA, Color, sound, digital

    Three Approaches is collection of three animated dance performances by Ethan Osman, with sound by Carrie Neumayer. Each piece explores a different process or approach. Ethan uses the human form to explore movement without visual references or dance experience, embodying the 'dancers' to somatically explore the possibilities of movement, one frame at a time. While working on the first approach, Ethan met musician and visual artist, Carrie, who shared love for process oriented artwork and ‘chance’ operation, particularly the collaborations between John Cage and Merce Cunningham. Ethan and Carrie's collaboration began with the mantra, “whatever you make will be perfect.” This climate of safety also formed an intentional practice of allowing the other person to become the ‘chance’ element in each other’s process. For the second approach, Carrie made the music first for Ethan to ‘dance’ to. For the third approach, Carrie and Ethan developed a time code adapted from a text message conversation to compose/choreograph to.

    "I make handmade animated films and studies. By intuitively following each film's process without preliminary sketches or editing out mistakes, the films serve as a document of their own process. Ideas, mood, and focus shift each time I enter the studio. These subtleties are evident when each image is sequenced at 12 frames per second, and months of work can be condensed into moments. Similar to AI generated art, my work starts with following a process (algorithm) that often uses prompts, but the work holds all its meaning in being made by hand with life wrapped up in its process." -- Ethan Osman

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    Virtual Spectres
    Sarah Boo
    5mins12secs, 2022, Canada, color, sound, HD

    Virtual Spectres combines scrolling social media feeds with incomplete body scans, situating them together in 3D space. Moving patterns emerge when layers of TikTok footage are superpositioned and the silhouettes of their creators briefly occupy the same time and space, being swiped together and then away. The video ruminates on our existence as cyborgs in a state of the in-between and everywhere. How does it feel to have body-consciousness that is stretched between macro spaces and virtual spaces, duplicated between flesh organs and corporately owned data centers across the world?

    Sarah is a Toronto-based multimedia artist who spent her formative years immersed in virtual worlds of various shapes and sizes. Her internet and video works aim to make sense of her experiences of memory, space, and time in a techno-capitalist society. Recently, she has spent much of her time thinking about online sound environments and their ability to foster digital intimacy. She is currently in the Digital Futures program at OCAD University.

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    Busy
    Jan Otto Ertesvåg
    6mins52secs, 2021, Norway, color, sound, HD

    The reality of beach snails is not that much different from human lives, filled with an intricate interplay of social interaction and solitude, curiosity about the world and its rigid rules, fleetingness of life and the resilience to go on.

    Jan Otto Ertesvåg (Norway, 1969) holds an MA in Animation from the Royal College of Art in London (1997). His films have been screened and awarded worldwide. After 12 years of animating and directing in a variety of animation styles in Oslo, he is now based in Aalesund on the northwest coast of Norway where he continues developing and producing his own abstract stories. He now makes both animated and live action films outdoors in the scenery. Over the recent years he has made a trilogy "from the shore", directing awareness towards lifeforms and civilization.

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    Two Boys and a Dream
    Casey Carter
    20mins45secs, 2023, USA, Color, Sound, HD&16mm to HD

    Two young boys on a small farm explore the woods, tell stories about monsters on the moon, and recount their scariest dreams, while their father and mother take care of the garden and chickens, reflecting on their own fears and convictions. Recorded on HD, mini-dv, and super-8 cameras, the imagery slips formats as the film follows a dreamlike structure that morphs from an observational portrait to a psychological family diary - meditating on the tensions between familial intimacy, sentimentality, fear, and vulnerability. The mini-dv and super-8 formats invoke generations of home-movie making, collapsed into a portrait detached in time. A curious intimacy suggests the filmmaker may be part of the family too.

    CASEY CARTER is a filmmaker and interdisciplinary designer and researcher whose work engages nonfiction storytelling in film, photography, data visualization, and cartography. His photographs have been published and exhibited in the U.S., Ecuador, and China. He was a 2017-2018 UnionDocs Collaborative Studio Fellow. He holds bachelors degrees in both physics and photography from Middle Tennessee State University and a Master of Architecture from the University of Michigan.

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    Three Pride Flags
    Tom Bessoir
    2mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, digital

    Inspired by the joint Jasper Johns retrospective exhibitions at The Whitney Museum of American Art and The Philadelphia Museum of Art, I created three permutating pride flags.

    Tom Bessoir’s experimental films often use mathematics and randomness to explore perception and the structure of cinema.
    Tom was born and raised in the Astoria section of Queens in New York City in 1957. From there he commuted by subway to attended The Bronx High School of Science. Tom studied mathematics and electrical engineering at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. While attending the Engineering School, he took advantage of Art School classes, focusing on film theory and studying experimental filmmaking with Robert Breer. In the late 1970s, he started photographing the downtown music scene. His photographs have appeared on dozens of records as well as in films, books, magazines, and newspapers.

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    The Only Photograph of Emily Dickinson, American Poet
    Dennis Tupicoff
    7mins43secs, Australia, 2023, color, sound, digital

    As the "slant of light" comes and goes in a Massachusetts studio c1850, Emily summons up an English poet from an earlier age. Her playful vision of love and life ends in the unique photograph of Dickinson that survives today.

    Dennis has made many award-winning films as writer, director, producer, and animator: fiction and documentary, animated and live-action, comedy and drama – and often inventive combinations. He has also been a full-time lecturer at the VCA School of Film and Television in Melbourne, and has taught and conducted workshops in Europe, North America, Asia and Australia.

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    Site of Passage
    Lucy Kerr
    7mins, 2023, USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    In a mysterious room shrouded in darkness, six young women, through the possibilities of their imaginations, conjure a series of ritual games. By the end of their playful rite, the interwoven bodies, levitating, appear to become one.

    Lucy Kerr (b. Houston, Texas 1990) is a filmmaker, artist, choreographer, and educator. Her work is rooted in questions of image-making and performance and how both of these are tied up with ritual and transformation. Kerr received and MFA in Film/Video and Art from California Institute of the Arts in 2020. In 2022, she was named one of the 25 New Faces of Independent Film in Filmmaker Magazine. Her debut feature film, Family Portrait, premiered at the Locarno Film Festival in 2023 and garnered her the Locarno Boccalino d'Oro for Best Director, the feature film grant from Austin Film Society and the AirFrance Prize from FIDLab, and the New Horizons Award from US in Progress at the American Film Festival in Wroclaw, Poland. Her short film, Crashing Waves, is in the permanent collection of Frac Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in Marseille, France. Kerr’s projects have been presented by International Film Festival Rotterdam, FIDMarseille, San Sebastian International Film Festival, Reykjavik International Film Festival, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, REDCAT, Anthology Film Archives, Francois Ghebaly Gallery, The McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, and others.

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    Endearing Insanity
    Poyen Wang
    8mins36secs, 2022, USA, Color, sound, digital

    Employing the genres of horror and erotica, Endearing Insanity navigates the threshold where sensuality and terror meet. Staged within a small apartment kitchen, the seemingly ragged protagonist constrained in various enclosed spaces such as a cabinet, microwave, and sink, performs a monologue waiting for someone to visit. By utilizing the sensual as a tool, the protagonist calls the viewer to enter their intimate realm, gaining agency in a displaced environment. Hovering between the sincere and the absurd, the seductive and the repellant, Endearing Insanity reflects the longing for connection and the desire for visibility.

    Poyen Wang is an artist and filmmaker, born and raised in Taiwan and currently based in New York City. Informed by his queer and immigrant experience, his recent work employs the languages of performance art and cinema, and uses 3D computer graphics to create still and moving images, grappling with issues of identity, sexuality and masculinity through a psychological lens.
    He has had solo exhibitions at Essex Flowers, New York; Taipei Digital Art Center, Taiwan; 18th Street Arts Center, Los Angeles; Flux Factory, New York; and the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts. He teaches full-time at the Hunter College Department of Film and Media Studies.

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    Bodies #1: Milwaukee Waters
    Michelle Trujillo
    5mins5secs, USA, 2022, B/W , sound , 16mm to HD

    Bodies 1: Milwaukee Waters is the first installation in a series shot on 16mm film that explores the magic and life of public bodies of water. Images for this film were collected from the Milwaukee River, a community pond and the shoreline of Lake Michigan (Milwaukee Bay area). Throughout the 1800s, the Milwaukee River was used to carry sewage into Lake Michigan. The many tanneries, breweries and other industries lining the water, poured their waste into the river without any water treatment. Much work has gone into cleaning the water in the past decades and into removing dams, and flow barriers to increase fish passage. Much progress has been made and the water is much cleaner and safer than it used to be. However, the Milwaukee River Basin is still considered an area of concern (AOC). The main concern is the contaminants in the riverbed sediment such as PCBs, PAHs and heavy metals. My film focuses on the beauty found and restored within this area. My acknowledgement of this dirty past and work to be done stands in the recurring smoke stacks found within the film.

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    Michelle Trujillo received her BA in Multimedia Studies from Florida Atlantic University and her MFA in Film from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is currently working and living in Boston, MA where she is a Visiting Assistant Professor in Film and Video at MassArt.
    The focus of her practice is to question and explore representations of Latinx culture, gender and identity creation. Her work stems from an intersectional feminist perspective but does not always offer solutions to the problems it engages with. Instead, she is concerned with upsetting power structures and notions of normality through disorientation. She works in Spanish, English and Spanglish as a mirroring of her lived experience. She also works in various mediums such as eco and hand-processed 16mm film, digital video, 35mm still film and cyanotypes.




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    Saturday
    Sept.30
    2PM
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    Saturday
    Sept. 30th, 2PM
    Harvard FAS CAMLab
    Lower Level
    485 Broadway Cambridge
    MA 02138
    Harvard University

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    Program 05
    Traces


    Dehumanized
    Louis Brückner
    47secs, 2021, Germany, Color, sound, digital
    Here where everything ends
    Cláudia CÁRDENAS & JUCE FILHO
    19mins, 2023, Brazil, color, sound, 16mm to HD
    This World
    George Ferrandi
    6mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, HD
    Ashes of Roses
    Sasha Waters
    11mins30secs, 2023, USA, Color, Sound, HD&16mm to HD
    Bye Bye Now
    Louise Bourque
    8mins27, 2022, Canada, color, sound, 16mm to HD
    Living Lessons in the Museum of Order
    Malic Amalya
    20mins, USA, 2022, color, sound , 16mm to HD
    My beloved, grey-haired
    Anastasiia Kirii
    1mins17secs, 2023, Ukraine, color, sound, digital
    Tlaloc (Lines Drawn in Water)
    Abinadi Meza
    8mins38secs, 2023, USA, Color, sound, 16mm


    total: 72 mins

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    Dehumanized
    Louis Brückner
    47secs, 2021, Germany, Color, sound, digital

    "Dehumanized" is an experimental short film, in which the peace of the dead in a military cemetery is disturbed with loud war noises. The camera itself becomes a weapon.
    "The truth of war in a nutshell. Without words, but everything is said."
    Holger Janke, Pastor

    Louis Brückner has been making films since 2013, starting in high school. Afterwards, he completed an apprenticeship as a Technical Design Assistant. During the traininghe developed his obsession with experimental and animated films. Since 2020 he is studying "Film & Sound" at the FH Dortmund.
    My vision is to break new ground with passion and experimentation. - Louis Brückner

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    Here where everything ends
    Cláudia CÁRDENAS & JUCE FILHO
    19mins, 2023, Brazil, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    Here where everything ends is a poetic and experimental short-film, that travels in between documentary and fiction to approach a culture faced with extinction: the indegeonous peoples of Brazil. It is particularly about the sharing of knowledge of the Bugio village, and made in a collective way in every stage of 16mm footage, botanical revelation and sound caption. It tries to reactivate the memories of the origins of the Laklãnõ/Xokleng people, while observing what is lost with the alienation of their knowledge and culture practiced by colonialism.

    Cláudia Cárdenas (Rio de Janeiro, 1961) is an experimental audiovisual artist. Cláudia develops research work in video, film and experimental audio, as well as in the creation of experimental audiovisual works at Duo Strangloscope. She is also the creator and curator of Strangloscope – International Conference on Audio, Video / Film and Experimental Performance, which this year was in its 14th edition. Cláudia and Rafael, as Duo Strangloscope, started to carry out workshops and tutorials in experimental residencies in video both in Brazil and abroad for festivals around the world. They research has currently focused on experimental works with video art, expanded cinema and installation performances of different natures and in different supports.

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    This World
    George Ferrandi
    6mins, 2022, USA, color, sound, HD

    During a visit to the National Aquarium in Baltimore, my 90 year-old mom attempts to repeat after me the lines of Mary Oliver’s “This World,” a poem about the impossibility of writing a poem focusing on something in the world that isn’t special—because as soon as we focus on anything in the natural world, its special-ness becomes evident. My mom’s endearing fumbles in front of starfish and sharks demonstrate—with charming humor and poignancy— another level of truth in the premise of the poem.

    George Ferrandi is an American interdisciplinary artist known for her performance, installation and participatory projects that address issues of vulnerability, impermanence, fallibility and spectacle, often through experimental approaches to narrative.

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    Ashes of Roses
    Sasha Waters
    11mins30secs, 2023, USA, Color, Sound, HD&16mm to HD

    This movie is about loving things that are embarrassing and people who are inappropriate. It's an essay film reflection on popular trash; football parties; older men; adolescent desire and the outrageous yet mundane humiliations of being a teenage girl in the 1980s. With sound design by Kevin T. Allen and performance cameos by filmmakers Roger Beebe and Jason Livingston.

    As a moving image artist, I am committed to a feminist cinema of opposition that re-imagines personal and social histories in the spirit of engagement with an earlier age of radical-romantic image making. Using anachronistic strategies of cinematic collage, I stitch together original 16mm footage, found/archival films, images, music and text into lyrical, unsentimental (and hopefully sometimes funny) films that mine the tension between the subjective, lived experiences of women / artists / mothers with our interior lives of fantasy and projection, mourning and dread. —Sasha Waters

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    Bye Bye Now
    Louise Bourque
    8mins27, 2022, Canada, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    Waving hello to the filming cameraperson, the subjects through this very gesture, are also providing a future viewer with the acknowledgment of a constant good-bye to a fleeting moment.
    Yet when the film is projected and the captured gesture is seen, it's as if the subjects are saying hello again from the past.
    This film is an homage to the artist's father, the man behind the camera in these personal family archives.

    The filmmaker Louise Bourque recently moved back to Montréal after spending 30 years in the United States and elsewhere. Her films have been screened in more than forty-five countries and broadcast on PBS and the Sundance Channel in the US as well as on Télé-Québec in Canada and SBS in Australia. Her work has been presented by major galleries and museums worldwide, including the Musée de la Civilisation and the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec in Québec city, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

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    Living Lessons in the Museum of Order
    Malic Amalya
    20mins, USA, 2022, color, sound , 16mm to HD

    Living Lessons in the Museum of Order examines the carceral logics of the Orca Encounter at SeaWorld San Diego and the “Doing Time” tour of the former Alcatraz prison in the San Francisco Bay. Juxtaposing original 16mm footage, promotional VHS and 16mm footage, and analog video feedback, Living Lessons in the Museum of Order explores the tensions between public fantasies and exploitative practices, as well as between rhetorical and cultural changes, within the two California entertainment empires.

    Malic Amalya (b. 1980. Burlington, VT) is an experimental filmmaker living and working in Boston. Malic is an Assistant Professor of Experimental Media and Film Production at Emerson College. His films have screened widely and are distributed by Canyon Cinema in San Francisco and Collectif Jeune Cinema in Paris.

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    My beloved, grey-haired
    Anastasiia Kirii
    1mins17secs, 2023, Ukraine, color, sound, digital

    When the war started in Ukraine, I moved to Barcelona, got there by 9 trains with my dog Penka. This is the first film I created as a reflection to this experience.

    Born and raised in Kyiv, Anastasiia Kirii always loved books and used to play them out in my room, with dialogues and accents.

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    Tlaloc (Lines Drawn in Water)
    Abinadi Meza
    8mins38secs, 2023, USA, Color, sound, 16mm

    Tlaloc (Lines Drawn in Water) is a handmade cameraless 16mm film of materiality and transformation; an enigmatic otherworld where hues of water evolve into prismatic blooms. Tlaloc is the deity of waters, rain, lightning, and growth in the Aztec pantheon. This film explores the membrane of film itself - a moving skin marked by fluid, punctured by light. The protean soundtrack was entirely composed with contact microphones to capture handmade surface markings and gestures. The motion picture was made with direct animation, scratching, hand-painting, and contact-printing techniques.

    Abinadi Meza (US/MX) is a Latinx-Indigenous artist who studied creative writing, art and architecture, and whose practice includes experimental film, sound art, and installation. Meza’s films are made with found and original footage, hand-painted film, and original soundtracks.
    Meza's award-winning films have been presented at: Anthology Film Archives, New York; Antimatter, Victoria BC; Athens International Film & Video Festival; Atlanta Film Festival; Aurora Picture Show, Houston; Blaffer Art Museum, Houston; Bogotá Experimental Film Festival; Festival de Cine Radical, La Paz; Cosmic Rays, Chapel Hill; Crossroads Festival, San Francisco; Festival ECRÃ, Rio de Janeiro; Esto Es Para Esto, Monterrey; Filmmakers’ Cooperative, New York; Flatpack Festival, Birmingham; Houston Cinema Arts Festival; Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; Istanbul International Experimental Film Festival; Kassel Dokfest, Germany; Mientras Tanto Cine, Montevideo; Minneapolis Institute of Art; non-syntax Festival, Taipei; ULTRAcinema, Tepoztlán; Weisman Art Museum, Minneapolis; and Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus among other places.

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    Saturday
    Sept.30
    4PM
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    Saturday
    Sept. 30th, 4PM
    Harvard FAS CAMLab
    Lower Level
    485 Broadway Cambridge
    MA 02138
    Harvard University

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    Program 06
    Chronicles


    River
    Penny McCann
    2mins57secs, 2023, Canada, B/W, sound, 16mm to digital
    Bezuna
    Saif Alsaegh
    7mins30secs, 2023, USA, color, sound, HD
    Fleshwork
    Lydia Cornett
    7mins, 2022, USA, B/W&color, sound, 16mm to HD
    Daybook
    Alfred Guzzetti
    23mins30secs, 2022, USA, Color, Sound, HD
    Exquisite Corpse Trilogy
    Seokyoung Yang
    17mins, 2023, Korea, color, sound, digital, 16mm & Super8 to HD
    Fathers' Land
    Francesco Di Gioia
    11mins24secs, Italy, 2021, B/W, sound , found footage to HD
    How to Build a House out of Wreckage and Rags
    Bernd Lützeler
    8mins, 2022, Germany, color, sound, Super8 & 16mm to digital


    total: 75 mins

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    River
    Penny McCann
    2mins57secs, 2023, Canada, B/W, sound, 16mm to digital

    A hand-processed black and white study of the Ottawa River in winter. Commissioned by the Lightproof Film Collective with sound design by Eric Walker.

    Canadian media artist Penny McCann's body of work spans thirty years and encompasses both narrative and experimental films and video. Since 2000, she has been engaged in creating a body of experimental films that journeys through an abstract and poetic terrain marked by half-glimpsed memories and fragments of the past, forming a sustained poetic meditation on landscape, place and time. According to Cecilia Araneda in her essay commissioned by Gallery 101 to accompany her 2020 exhibition, Land Lines (of time and place) in no particular order: “McCann intervenes with our sense of the familiar with her use of hand-crafted analogue filmmaking approaches … purposefully setting it back into a kind of suspension that we immediately associate with the dream state of processing memories.”

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    Bezuna
    Saif Alsaegh
    7mins30secs, 2023, USA, color, sound, HD

    Bezuna explores the complexities of fleeing a war-zone through the analysis of peripheral details. Through interweaving different narratives, the film presents the raw and broken feelings of a child and a cat whose lives will never be the same.

    Saif Alsaegh is a United States-based filmmaker from Baghdad. Much of Saif’s work deals with the contrast between the landscape of his youth in Baghdad growing up as part of the Chaldean minority in the nineties and early 2000s, and the U.S. landscape where he currently lives. His films have screened in festivals including Cinéma du Réel, Kurzfilm Hamburg, Kassel Dokfest, and in galleries and museums including the Wisconsin Triennial at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art and Rochester Contemporary Art Center. He received his MFA in film from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

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    Fleshwork
    Lydia Cornett
    7mins, 2022, USA, B/W&color, sound, 16mm to HD

    At a butcher shop in Jeromesville, Ohio, four meat processors situate their labor within their own minds and bodies.

    Lydia Cornett (she/her/hers) is filmmaker based between Columbus, Ohio and Brooklyn, New York. As a former musician turned filmmaker, she makes work that unites the restraint of observational storytelling with the physicality and connective qualities she associates with music-making. Her work has screened at AFI Fest, BAMCinemaFest, Sheffield Doc Fest, AspenShortsFest, Hamptons International Film Festival, and DOC NYC, where she received a Special Jury Mention for her film Yves & Variation. She was awarded fellowships to the Jacob Burns Film Center’s Creative Culture program and the UnionDocs’ Collaborative Studio, and she has received support from the Tribeca Film Institute, IF/Then Shorts, the Princess Grace Foundation, and the NYC Women's Fund for Media, Music and Theatre. Her work has been distributed and featured by The New Yorker, PBS (POV and Reel South) Nowness, and Vimeo Staff Picks.

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    Daybook
    Alfred Guzzetti
    23mins30secs, 2022, USA, Color, Sound, HD

    October, 2019 to August, 2021. Fragments of remembered music, poems, glimpses of objects, recorded day by day, as if a chronicle— or elements of imaginary films yet to be made about a time that needs to be remembered but resists comprehension.

    Alfred Guzzetti is a filmmaker and Professor of Visual Arts at Harvard University. His work has been shown at the New York and Berlin film festivals and other festivals in London, Rotterdam, Germany, Spain and France, as well as in installation settings in New York, Copenhagen, Houston and Santa Monica. Guzzetti is the author of the book Two or Three Things I Know about Her: Analysis of a Film by Godard (1981) and a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

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    Exquisite Corpse Trilogy
    Seokyoung Yang
    17mins, 2023, Korea, color, sound, digital, 16mm & Super8 to HD

    Through three unsuccessful attempts and trials, a filmmaker seeks to reconcile with the death of her father. This film explores the strength of persevering through multiple attempts, even when the outcome is likely to be failure.

    Seokyoung Yang (she/they) is a curator, poet, and filmmaker dedicated to artistic experimentation. Born and raised in South Korea, she investigates the correlation between anomaly of language, diasporic bodies, and internal loss through moving images and texts. She received her BFA in film and video program at California Institute of the Arts. She currently resides in Los Angeles, California.

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    Fathers' Land
    Francesco Di Gioia
    11mins24secs, Italy, 2021, B/W, sound , found footage to HD

    1910s. Poems with alternate rhymes narrate a journey by sea and by rail. These are the verses of Fadil Hasin Ash-Shalmani who witness a historical fact often forgotten: the deportation of numerous civilians during the first years of the Italian occupation in Libya. The short film follows the poet's experiences and memories using only archive footage, thus subverting the original propaganda function of the images.

    Francesco Di Gioia (Gorizia, 1993) achieved a BA (Hons) at the Politecnico of Milan in Communication Design, after which he began a course at the Civica Scuola Luchino Visconti in Documentary Cinema. He then studied Video Editing at the Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia in Rome. He currently works as an archive researcher for several productions.

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    How to Build a House out of Wreckage and Rags
    Bernd Lützeler
    8mins, 2022, Germany, color, sound, Super8 & 16mm to digital

    Found footage: California in the 1950's and 60's. A young Indian couple enjoys their personal American dream come true in their home somewhere in the suburbs of San Francisco. In great detail they demonstrate their newly achieved wealth in front of their Super-8 camera. Like postcards, they would send these film rolls to their families back in India. Around the same time, an American missionary couple visits the city of Calcutta to shoot a Christian propaganda film. The drastic reality of poverty and famine in the streets of the Indian metropolis fits perfectly into their wicked plan: To promote the believe in Christ by showing the misery that pagan believers are doomed to suffer from.

    Artist and filmmaker Bernd Lützeler lives and works between Berlin and Mumbai. His films have been shown at venues and festivals worldwide, including Centre Pompidou, Berlinale International Film Festival, Rotterdam, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Views from the Avant-Garde and many more. Bernd is an active member of the artist-run analogue filmlab LaborBerlin.

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    Saturday
    Sept.30
    6PM
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    Saturday
    Sept. 30th, 6PM - 8PM
    Harvard FAS CAMLab
    Lower Level
    485 Broadway Cambridge
    MA 02138
    Harvard University

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    RPM23
    Festival Reception
    Saturday
    Sept.30
    8PM
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    Saturday
    Sept. 30th, 8PM
    Harvard FAS CAMLab
    Lower Level
    485 Broadway Cambridge
    MA 02138
    Harvard University

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    Program 07
    THRESHOLDS


    (r)evolution
    Vanessa Cardui
    1min, 2022, Germany, Color, sound, digital
    2cent / 10coil
    Monteith Mccollum
    10mins, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, HD
    A throwing forth
    Xiao Zhang
    6mins, 2023, China/USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD
    Rheme maining sources
    Ж
    17mins, 2022, Brazil, B/W & color, sound, digital
    Vision of Paradise
    Leonardo Pirondi
    16mins, 2022, Brazil, color, sound, digital, 16mm to HD
    Case Study One: The Shrink
    Mila Rae Mancuso
    5mins35secs, USA, 2022, B/W&Color, sound , 16mm to HD
    Babbler, Fairy and Thrush
    Karel Doing
    3mins44secs, 2022, UK, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm to HD
    Everything Comes Full Circle
    Lilan Yang
    13mins44secs, 2022, USA, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm


    total: 73 mins

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    (r)evolution
    Vanessa Cardui
    1min, 2022, Germany, Color, sound, digital

    (R)EVOLUTION is a 1- minute object animation film that explores the impact of plastic on wildlife. Researchers found that more than 1500 wildlife species worldwide have eaten plastic in the environment. 100 million marine animals die each year from plastic waste. And a recent study found that people eat five grams of micro and nano plastics every week. (R)EVOLUTION visualizes the increasing danger of plastic - it shows the extinction of animal species and how plastic takes over the body.

    Vanessa Cardui, born in 1987, is a Berlin based video artist. She studied art and media at university Hildesheim in Germany. Her work is characterized by artistic metamorphoses. She transforms everyday objects into pieces of art by exploring the different techniques of animation to bring the objects to life. She works with meaningful color contrasts and creates an imaginative world that arises from the texture of the material.

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    2cent / 10coil
    Monteith Mccollum
    10mins, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, HD

    Part science, part history, 2cent / 10coil is an exploration into the physical properties of a U.S. postage stamp and the anomalies it presents when subjected to the beam of an electron microscope. Integrated within, are the philosophical musings and speeches of a man in his last weeks of life on a quest entitled, “The Voyage of Understanding.”

    I like to say this subject found me. At the Analytic Diagnostics lab at Binghamton University I received training over many months culminating in access to a Scanning Electron Microscope. I was enamored with the unique possibilities the SEM offered despite its difficulties. I brought in a small stamp collection to give myself border limitations. The 1932 Harding stamp was the first to come to life. Using the SEM is a slow process, after sealing the stamp in the chamber and composing a shot there was only time for approximately 120 consecutive scans per session. This particular stamp reacted in a way the others hadn’t, fibers came to life and the ink danced. None of these images are animated with software. The mysterious movement stems from the scanning process itself and the build up of heat from the electrons rendering the object.
    – monteith mccollum

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    A throwing forth
    Xiao Zhang
    6mins, 2023, China/USA, color, sound, 16mm to HD

    A time remnant inhabits a personal space with a secret, private, unspoken word of one's being. Sliding planes of window and time, throwing drifts of the inner and the outer self, the film seeks in the interval of memory for a transitory reunion with my family.

    Xiao Zhang is an artist-filmmaker from China living in Los Angeles. She received her BFA at Beijing Film Academy in 2020 and currently holds an MFA in Film/Video at CalArts. Her practice centers on personal poetics which derives from cross-generation memory and diaristic approaches. It continues by employing methods drawn from handcrafted celluloid film and expanded cinema. Her work often offers a complex fluctuation between material reality and subjective experience.

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    Rheme maining sources
    Ж
    17mins, 2022, Brazil, B/W & color, sound, digital

    A place-specific film-excavation of Bixiga neiborhood-São Paulo.
    Choreography of forces that cross present time.
    Filmancy, clairvoyance is the vision of what is taking shape.
    Allegory: lobby-color, speculates.
    Hollow in the heart of the city, a rock. A bird ‘rappina’ lands.
    Novelty: Quilombo, alley, dealers:step. Vai-Vai samba school’s black and white banner. Pictograms from Benjamin’s “The Arcades project”.
    Progress: pluging a river while it’s possible.
    Commodity: Matarazzo & Metro. The real state of things, real estate: banning organic. Ground- quotation, blue taroes, water tanks, oxum: (cosmo) political reaction. Rheme maining sources: life asking for passage.

    Ж is a film-designer, educator and programmer. His films, video-installations and texts have been exhibited in festivals, galleries and museums such as: SFMoma -Cinemateque (Crossroads 2018)- EUA; Pantalla Global CCCB-Barcelona; Museo San Telmo -San Sebastián-Espanha; EAC (Espacio de Arte Contemporaneo)-Uruguay; Microscope Gallery; Bienal SURb2021-Buenos Aires, 13 Bienal de Artes Mediales (Temblor)- Chile; Berwick Film & Media Fesitival-Reino Unido; Programa de Exposições CCSP-SP-Brazil (solo); Revista ArtContexto- Brazil; 19 Fest CurtasBH-Brazil; 13 CineOP-Brazil; CantorGallery, Massachusetts - USA; VisArts– Frame & Frequency 3– Rockville- USA; CCEG- Centro Cultural España-Guatemala; La Darsena - Argentina; Sala Nordeste -MinC- Brazil; Museu da Imagem e do Som (MIS)- Brazil; Dobra Festival Internacional do Cinema Experimental- Cinemateca MAM- Rio de Janeiro, Blitz#27: Ж Economia/Ecologia _ Zumzeig Cinema-Barcelona, among many others.

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    Vision of Paradise
    Leonardo Pirondi
    16mins, 2022, Brazil, color, sound, digital, 16mm to HD

    The great voyages to the "New World" were seen as expanding the frontiers of the visible and displacing those of the invisible, therefore, maps from that time render the real and imaginary. The film follows a voyage of the Brazilian Military in search of an imaginary island with the same name as their country. The myth from 1483 Brazil, or Hy-Brazil, is known to exist to the west of Ireland and above the Fortunate Islands. Vision of Paradise is an examination of the capacity of the human imagination and computer simulations to construct environments. Amidst the fine threshold of the real, simulated, and imagined, the film analyzes the contemporary ideas of virtual reality and their ambition to expand the frontiers of the physical world into a "New World".

    LEONARDO PIRONDI is a Brazilian filmmaker based in Los Angeles. His films explore the infinite abyss between the multiple derived versions of reality through documentary, experimental, and narrative modes. Much of his work uses analog and digital manipulations on celluloid to examine the sociopolitical unfoldings of the intersections between imagination, science, myth, and technology. His films have been exhibited at various film festivals, institutions, and venues internationally, such as the International Film Festival Rotterdam, New York Film Festival, Viennale, BFI London, Melbourne, Edinburgh, Guanajuato, True/False, Ambulante, Curtas Vila do Conde, Wexner Center, REDCAT, and others. Some of his work exists in the collection of the UCLA Film & Television Archive, Cinematheque of the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro, and The Film-Makers' Coop. in New York. He holds a Film/Video degree from CalArts, is a Sundance Ignite Fellow, and is the recipient of the Allan Sekula Social Documentary Fund and the Tim Disney Prize for Excellence in the Storytelling Arts.

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    Case Study One: The Shrink
    Mila Rae Mancuso
    5mins35secs, USA, 2022, B/W&Color, sound , 16mm to HD

    A short poetry thesis film surveying transitory object-life and permanence. Concepts arose from games of exquisite corpse & practices of automatic writing —part one of a series of vignettes. Shot on 500T 16mm, hand processed.

    Mila Rae Mancuso is a writer and interdisciplinary artist whose creative work is driven by the subconscious. Writing poetry since the age of 14, her work is fueled by self-discovery and contemporary feminist surrealism which explores the complex intersection of fairytales, girlhood, and the macabre. Mancuso’s work often entwines the worlds of literature, art, filmmaking, and experimental processes to create an occupancy of its own kind.

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    Babbler, Fairy and Thrush
    Karel Doing
    3mins44secs, 2022, UK, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm to HD

    An unfiltered stream of perception: small objects and grand panoramas appear simultaneously. The certainties of near and far, detail and overview, inside and outside are deliberately thrown into confusion. Aided by ‘in camera’ superimposition and travelling mattes a near abstract experience is created. Sunlight filters through semi-transparent surfaces, while small holes and cracks allow the light to travel unrestrained. The work was conceived and shot within a few hundred yards from my house, focusing on the plants, flowers, trees and ferns that grow around me.The soundtrack is composed with noises and voices from that same area, revealing a further abundance of life.

    Karel Doing is an independent artist, filmmaker and researcher whose practice investigates the relationship between culture and nature by means of analogue and organic process, experiment and co-creation.

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    Everything Comes Full Circle
    Lilan Yang
    13mins44secs, 2022, USA, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm

    Following Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas (1984) filming locations from Houston, Texas to Los Angeles, California, I use a 16mm Bolex camera to capture the vastness of the American West. The footage draws me to reminisce about snippets of my everyday life. I contemplate how we perceive the world through analog optical apparatuses and how memories are multidimensional yet fragile. Our recollections of people and places can be distorted, unrecognizable, and fictitious. These memories would eventually diminish with the passing of time. Everything Comes Full Circle is a personal attempt to remember things that will soon be forgotten.
    The original footage was shot in Kodak 16mm film stocks during the summer of 2021 and edited digitally with voiceover. Later the digital moving images were inkjet printed on clear film spliced together with perforations cut out with a laser cutter. Each run of the projection makes the printer ink slowly melt, and the film will eventually fall into decay over the course of time.

    Lilan Yang is an artist and experimental filmmaker from Chongqing, China. Her practice explores the myth of cities and landscapes, ways of seeing and unseeing, and sentiments of remembering and forgetting, through lens-based analog media such as 16mm filmmaking and 35mm photography, as well as digital technologies such as machine learning and data visualization. She received a BS in Computer Engineering from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an MFA in Digital + Media from Rhode Island School of Design.

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    Sunday
    Oct. 1
    2PM
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    Sunday
    Oct. 1, 2pm
    Harvard FAS CAMLab
    Lower Level
    485 Broadway Cambridge
    MA 02138
    Harvard University

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    Program 08
    Unknown Languages


    A Thousand Years Ago
    Edgar Jorge Baralt
    20mins, 2022, USA, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm to digital
    Damp Moss
    Christopher Thompson
    4mins22secs, 2023, USA, color, sound, super8 to HD
    Dear Monster
    Stefano P. Testa
    15mins, 2023, Italy, Color, Sound, HD
    In Littleness
    Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu
    8mins15secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 8mm to HD
    istén:'a
    KJ Edwards
    5mins12secs, Canada, 2023, Color, sound, 16mm to HD
    Language Unknown
    Janelle VanderKelen
    6mins10secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm to digital
    Pump
    Charles Cadkin
    4mins42secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm to digital
    This Is How I Felt
    Josh Weissbach
    1mins35secs, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm
    With The Tide, with the tide
    Anna Kipervaser
    2mins49secs, 2022, USA, Color, sound, 16mm to digital

    total: 71 mins

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    A Thousand Years Ago
    Edgar Jorge Baralt
    20mins, 2022, USA, B/W & Color, sound, 16mm to digital

    (In an imaginary look back at the present from the year 2049, an exile returns to Los Angeles decades after being displaced by large scale social and environmental collapse. Once back, he recreates his past (our present), and imagines the lives of those who inhabited his apartment during his absence. His sense of displacement leads to a meditation on place, memory, and dreams.

    Edgar Jorge Baralt (b. 1988) is a Venezuelan-born filmmaker based in Chicago, whose personal work tackles questions of memory and temporality, incorporating multiple formats in his practice. He obtained an MFA in Film and Video from the California Institute of the Arts. His work has been programmed at different international venues and festivals, including the Berlinale, LA Filmforum, Chicago Underground Film Festival, Kasseler Dokfest, Bucharest International Experimental Film Festival, among others. His films attempt to destabilize rigid ways of understanding identity, perception, and landscape.

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    Damp Moss
    Christopher Thompson
    4mins22secs, 2023, USA, color, sound, super8 to HD

    Glittering illusions of vectorized providence attempt to emulate an inherited physical realm of diminishing significance.

    Christopher Thompson (1990) is a contemporary American artist and filmmaker whose work examines desire, capital, and the seemingly supernatural forces that govern its acceleration. His films and video works have been featured in film festivals and exhibitions worldwide, including San Francisco Cinematheque’s CROSSROADS Film Festival, Prismatic Ground, Mimesis Documentary Film Festival, the 5th Odessa Biennale at the Odessa Museum of Contemporary Art, and “Late capitalism, it's like, almost over” at The Luminary in St. Louis. He holds a B.A. from the University of Southern Indiana and an M.F.A. from Washington University in St. Louis, where he studied video art and performance. He is also the director of HATERS, an online moving image journal. Thompson lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

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    Dear Monster
    Stefano P. Testa
    15mins, 2023, Italy, Color, Sound, HD

    A fragmented collection of letters tells the story of Elio’s passage from adolescence to adulthood. Elio is a restless and disobedient Italian 18-year-old fellow who lives his youth between cheating and betrayals during the swinging 60s.

    “Dear Monster” is a collection of authentic documents. However, there are few historical and biographical references to the characters. Voices and handwriting are the only elements useful to draw the senders’ psychological profiles. The texts are read and interpreted by actors; the voices are inserted into sound environments, as if hypothetically present at the time of writing. The film develops visually through a slow overlap of symbolic and evocative images of the inner universe of the young Elio. Through the use of fade effects, the pages of the letters merge with photographs, magazine clippings and some amateur films of the time. The result is a stratification of worn-out textures and faded colours. “Dear Monster” is a backward journey in memories, in search of lost affections.

    Stefano P. Testa was born in 1988. He lives and works in Bergamo (Italy) as a camera operator, video editor, colorist and post-production technician. Since 2010 he has been collaborating with Lab 80 film in documentary films production and with Bergamo Film Meeting, in charge of the festival audiovisual communication.

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    In Littleness
    Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu
    8mins15secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 8mm to HD

    The film was shot on a regular 8mm camera and is presented in unslit form as 16mm, a screening format commonly referred to as double 8mm. When I first came into contact with this medium, I was deeply attracted by its miniature size. Eight millimeters is a very small space on which to store images. It reminds me of all kinds of things from childhood: ephemeral, wonderful, changeable. Recalling that as a child I spent most of my time with my nanny, I decided to zoom in on daily life, especially trivial household chores. At the same time, the particles and dust of the childhood world are magnified.

    Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu (b. 1982, Kaohsiung, Taiwan) is an interdisciplinary artist, filmmaker and writer whose work is grounded in literature and the conceptual avant-garde. Cherlyn’s creative activity often starts from a life event or curiosity concerning an anomaly in language or in the material world. It continues by employing methods drawn from both Eastern and Western practices and philosophies. Her working method at various times involves handcrafted material, mixed media, and experimental interchange between new and old technologies.

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    istén:'a
    KJ Edwards
    5mins12secs, Canada, 2023, Color, sound, 16mm to HD

    A poetic retelling of a visit from the artist’s mother, istén:'a looks to dreamspace as a meeting place for us and our late loved ones who we are always tethered to.

    KJ Edwards is a Kanien’kehá:ka,mixed-settler filmmaker and media artist. Their family is from Kahnawa:ké and Longueuil, Quebec, Canada; while KJ was born and raised in Treaty 6 Territory, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Holding a BFA in Film Production from the Toronto Metropolitan University, KJ is trained in narrative, documentary and experimental filmmaking techniques, using both analogue and digital hybrid workflows. They are a 2023 MFA graduate from Emily Carr University of Art + Design, located on unceded traditional Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Territory in Vancouver. KJ's thesis work involved eco processing analogue film, reflecting on the unpredictability of the medium as that of a collaborator, and the ways that dreams and memory can offer creative pathways toward content creation.

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    Language Unknown
    Janelle VanderKelen
    6mins10secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm to digital

    This film embraces plant sentience as fact and speculates how beings of the vegetal variety might approach interspecies communication with humans (who are far more sensorially limited). Leaves, mycelium, and roots playfully examine how humans experience the world, and the (supposedly) silent watchers consider what language those swift blurs of human might possibly understand.

    Janelle VanderKelen is an artist, curator, and educator currently based in Knoxville, TN. Her films and intermedia installations imagine alternative acts of relation between imperfect bodies (human, vegetal, geological, or otherwise) and make visible the agency of plants through experimental time-based media processes. VanderKelen’s work has been exhibited at institutions including the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art in Boulder, CO; Anthology Film Archives in New York; and Bow Arts in London, England. Her films have screened at Ann Arbor Film Festival, True/False, Athens International Film + Video Festival, Revelation Perth International Film Festival, IC DOCS, San Diego Underground Film Festival, and Antimatter [Media Art] Film Festival.

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    Pump
    Charles Cadkin
    4mins42secs, 2022, USA, color, sound, 16mm to digital

    On the Northwest side of Chicago, large swaths of people have been gathering for decades to fill their containers with water from a magical water pump.

    Charles Cadkin is a visual artist concerned with documenting and preserving neglected personal and local histories through topography, landscape and body. He holds a BS in Cinema and Photography from Ithaca College and resides in Chicago, IL.

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    This Is How I Felt
    Josh Weissbach
    1mins35secs, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm

    This Is How I Felt was filmed in a twenty-four period while the filmmaker was wearing a heart monitor to investigate possible arrhythmias.

    Josh Weissbach is an experimental filmmaker. He lives in a house with his wife, two daughters, three cats, and six chickens next to a once abandoned village. His films and videos have been shown worldwide in such venues as Ann Arbor Film Festival, Slamdance Film Festival, European Media Art Festival, Mono No Aware, Chicago Underground Film Festival, 25 FPS Festival, and Alchemy Film and Moving Image Festival. He has won jury prizes at Videoex, ICDOCS, $100 Film Festival, Onion City Experimental Film and Video Festival, Berlin Revolution Film Festival, and Haverhill Experimental Film Festival.

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    With The Tide, with the tide
    Anna Kipervaser
    2mins49secs, 2022, USA, Color, sound, 16mm to digital


    I know, you're a seasonal beast
    Like the starfish that drift in with the tide
    With the tide
    So until your blood runs
    To meet the next full moon
    Your madness fits in nicely with my own
    With my own
    Your lunacy fits neatly with my own
    My very own
    - from Sea Song by Robert Wyatt

    Anna Kipervaser is a Ukrainian-born artist whose practice engages with a range of topics including human and animal bodies, ethnicity, religion, colonialism, and environmental conservation. Her engagement with these topics is informed by a commitment to formal experimentation, DIY and alternative processes, spanning disciplines including experimental and documentary moving image works in both 16mm film and digital video.

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    Sunday
    Oct. 1
    4PM
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    Sunday
    Oct. 1, 4pm
    Harvard FAS CAMLab
    Lower Level
    485 Broadway Cambridge
    MA 02138
    Harvard University

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    Program 09
    Drifts and Detours


    From Here
    Flor Marmolejo
    2mins, 2023, USA, Color, sound, digital
    Reclamation Project No. 1
    Tyler Bohm
    1min13secs, 2022, USA, Color, sound, HD
    In these rows of hurried lines
    Michel Boulanger
    9mins9, 2022, Canada, B/W, sound, HD
    Panorama
    Djuly Gava & Daniel Leão
    17mins, 2023, Brazil, Color, Sound, 4k
    Show de bleu
    Antoine Larocque
    2mins, 2022, Canada, color, sound, HD
    Continental Drifts
    Georg Koszulinski
    12mins, USA, 2022, Color, sound, HD
    I Gave It To You
    Claire Maske
    2mins45secs, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm to digital
    Homesick Lungs
    Felix Klee
    15mins, 2022, Germany, B/W, sound, digital

    total: 76 mins

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    From Here
    Flor Marmolejo
    2mins, 2023, USA, Color, sound, digital

    Thoughts about belonging, cultural symbols, and personal loss.

    This short essay film grew out of my inability to reconcile with the distance that separates me (as a hyphenated-American) from my country of origin. Rather than a lived, embodied knowledge of Mexico, I walk around with myths and symbols that are my access to a country that should be so familiar. Entwined with this subjective experience is the objective reality that these same cultural myths and symbols shroud a palpable violence that lurks beneath the surface in Mexico. When faced with the disappearance of someone close to me, the distance shrouds them in a mythic story for me as well. Flor Marmolejo

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    Reclamation Project No. 1
    Tyler Bohm
    1min13secs, 2022, USA, Color, sound, HD

    Reclamation Project No. 1 is an AI-driven experimental short which explores an urban environment reverting to its natural state. The work represents both a reversion to an earlier era, and, potentially a progression through climatic upheaval into a future state where nature has reclaimed the city.

    Ty Bohm is a new media artist and filmmaker who spent several years working in the architectural industry, where he adopted the tools of digital modeling to create experimental works exploring the impact of technological advancement. In recent years, his work has been shown at FILE Festival (São Paulo), CineAutopsia (Bogotá), Cue Art Foundation (New York), Museum of Science Boston, Science Gallery Atlanta, NURTUREart (Brooklyn), Equity Gallery (New York), Boston Cyberarts Gallery, Terrault Contemporary (Baltimore), Proto Gomez (New York), Icebox Project Space (Philadelphia), Trestle Gallery (Brooklyn), Weston Art Gallery (Cincinnati), Gallery Madison Park (New York), Proto Gallery (Hoboken, NJ), Plexus Projects (Brooklyn) and Ann Street Gallery (Newburgh, NY). He is a graduate of Kenyon College and University of Oxford and lives in San Diego.

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    In these rows of hurried lines
    Michel Boulanger
    9mins9, 2022, Canada, B/W, sound, HD

    This video depicts the torment of a farm worker who ends up sabotaging his watering plan and abandoning his tractor to better enter into a sensual relationship with the earth and the vegetation. The character questions the disembodied relationship to time and space in his work. As a challenge to break with his work schedule, our farmer performs a kind of ballet on his powerful machine before running in the fields, stopping, or rolling on the ground getting better interest in the details of the ground, following the sinuous line of a grass snake on a ground marked by the straightness of the lines. On a poetic tone, his voice is an ode to the reappropriation of time and space, a return to a form of existence where the movement of the body in itself is a strong moment.

    Michel Boulanger, born in Montmagny, Québec, is a multidisciplinary artist that lives and works in Montréal. He holds a master’s degree in Visual Arts from Université du Québec à Montréal (1992). Michel Boulanger has participated in several exhibitions in Canada and in countries overseas, such as the United-Kingdom, France, Spain, the United-States and Mexico. In 2004, his work was featured in a solo exhibition at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal. His works furthermore belong to a number of public and private collections. Founding member of Galerie B-312, he has been professor at the École des arts visuels et médiatiques de l’UQAM from 2001 to 2020 where he started Grupmuv, a research-creation laboratory dedicated to drawing and moving images with professors Gisèle Trudel and Thomas Corriveau.

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    Panorama
    Djuly Gava & Daniel Leão
    17mins, 2023, Brazil, Color, Sound, 4k

    Panorama is a marginal film like Panorama, one of the largest housing projects in southern Brazil. Located on the side of a highway on the outskirts of Florianópolis, the Panorama Housing Project was built in 1989, the year of the first Brazilian presidential election after the end of the military dictatorship. Through the appropriation of archival footage of the residents, the film narrates the passage of time in community life. Directed and edited by residents of the complex, Panorama is both an ode to possible joys of everyday life and a subtle reflection about what leads us to photograph, the ways of permanence of the past and the migration of images from familiar contexts to the public and common territory of the cinematic space.

    Djuly Gava (Florianópolis, 1995) holds a master's degree in Contemporary Artistic Processes and is graduated in Visual Arts by the State University of Santa Catarina. She participates in exhibitions and art fairs since 2013, such as: 11th National Salon Victor Meirelles, 2022; 15th National Salon of Itajaí, 2021; Tijuana Printed Art Fair, Casa do Povo, São Paulo/SP, 2019; Microutopias - Feria de Arte Impreso de Montevideo, Centro Cultural España, Montevideo/Uruguay, 2019. Her photographic work is part of the collection of Santa Catarina Art Museum. She has been working with cinema since 2015.
    Daniel Leão (Rio de Janeiro, 1984) is a documentary filmmaker, visual artist, professor and book editor. Graduated in cinema from Fluminense Federal University (2010), Master in Image and Sound Analysis from the same institution, Doctor in Visual Arts from State University of Santa Catarina with a sandwich period at New York University (2020) and is currently carrying out post-doctoral research in the area of Literature about the Brazilian documentaries about the coup d’état against former president Dilma Rousseff. Daniel has been working as documentarist and visual artist since 2013, works that have been exhibited in several Brazilian and international institutions, such as the Museum of Modern Art in New York (MoMA).

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    Show de bleu
    Antoine Larocque
    2mins, 2022, Canada, color, sound, HD

    Show de bleu (2022) is a short film shot in Tingwick, in the Centre-du-Québec region. The title of the work comes from a Quebec expression which refers to burnout. Tire squealing (burnout) occurs when motorists cause their vehicles to lose traction so that the accelerated rolling of the wheels generates blue smoke. This practice, deemed illegal by the road safety code, highlights life in rural areas and the leisure activities that constitute it. The video thus highlights automobile culture through the encounter between its followers. By trying to “leave their mark”, they participate in a form of filial ritual. The sequence of images is taken from scenes found and filmed by Antoine Larocque. It is accompanied by a soundtrack created by the composer Charles Barabé.

    Born in Arthabaska in 1995, Antoine Larocque is a visual artist. His work is characterized by a personal, raw and experimental approach to the image. He favors rudimentary means and elements found in his daily life, with the aim of transfiguring the aesthetic codes of the popular culture of the region where he grew up. He mainly uses photography, painting, video and writing. His video works are distributed by Vidéographe and have been broadcast in Canada and internationally.

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    Continental Drifts
    Georg Koszulinski
    12mins, USA, 2022, Color, sound, HD

    A fictional account of David Koresh’s last words, a cursory analysis of the pantheon of Icelandic sagas, a home movie taking into account 20 years of filming on an old Bolex 16mm camera, a series of reflections on the destructive nature of industrialized societies: a collage film, metaphysical road trip movie in time of pandemic and social uprising. A point-and-shoot epistolary fever dream collage film made in times of multiple crises.

    Georg has been making films and videos since 1999. His recent work engages issues of the Anthropocene and merges his interests in science, poetry, and radical forms of non-fiction filmmaking. His award-winning works have been presented at hundreds of film festivals around the world. Georg is an associate professor of film studies at the University of North Carolina - Wilmington where he teaches courses in documentary & experimental modes of filmmaking.

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    I Gave It To You
    Claire Maske
    2mins45secs, 2022, USA, B/W, sound, 16mm to digital

    Two friends discuss guilt and personal responsibility after one transmits covid to another during an already hard time in her life.

    Claire Maske is an artist and filmmaker currently based in boston: Her work largely revolves around themes of illness, grief, and death- She is interested in the body and all the ways it can fail. Much of Her work is informed by own experiences of grief and loss, and Her anxieties surrounding these topics fuel its form and content.

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    Homesick Lungs
    Felix Klee
    15mins, 2022, Germany, B/W, sound, digital

    You can't bring back a dead horse, but there are ways to step into a place that was lost. "Homesick Lungs" is an experimental farewell. The film delves into the lungs of Sheila, the dying horse, and the history of a sold family farm. 3D animations, screen recordings and documentary footage combine to form an essay on reconstructed memory. In the end, the wind brushes through virtual nettles.

    Felix Klee (*1990) lives and works in Munich where he currently studies directing for documentary film at University of Television and Film Munich. From 2020 – 2022 he serves as an advisory board member at Locarno Film Festival. Together with Gisela Carbajal Rodríguez he received the 12-month media art scholarship by Kirch foundation and HFF Munich for 2022. In 2019 he received Kirch foundation's project founding grant. He is a graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts Munich where he studied time-based media under Prof. Julian Rosefeldt and painting under Prof. Pia Fries. He studied painting under Prof. Thomas Hartmann at the Academy of Fine Arts Nuremberg and was a guest student at Universidad de las Artes Aguascalientes Mexico.

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    Tuesday
    Oct. 17
    8PM
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    • Tuesday
      Oct. 17th, 8PM
      Brattle Theatre
      40 Brattle Street
      Cambridge MA
      617-876-6837
    RPM Solo Artist:
    Michael Snow

    Waiting for Snow

    RPM Festival and the Brattle Theatre are excited to announce our co-presentation of "Waiting for Snow," a long-awaited tribute to the avant-garde filmmaker Michael Snow. This special event will showcase three of Snow's classic films, namely "New York Eye and Ear Control" (1964), "Wavelength" (1967), and "Standard Time" (1967), in their original 16mm format. The screening is scheduled for October 17th at 8:00 PM at the historic Brattle Theatre in Cambridge.

    Michael Snow (1928 -2023), a trailblazer in the world of experimental cinema, once stated, "My paintings are done by a filmmaker, sculpture by a musician, films by a painter, music by a filmmaker, paintings by a sculptor, sculpture by a filmmaker, films by a musician, music by a sculptor." This encapsulates his multidisciplinary approach to art, which has had a lasting impact on film, music, and visual arts.

    The soundtrack of "New York Eye and Ear Control" (1964) was recorded by the Jazz Improvisations group led by avant-garde jazz saxophonist Albert Ayler, featuring trumpeter Don Cherry, drummer Sonny Murray, and other notable figures in New York's free jazz scene. One of the highlights of this event is the rare screening of Michael Snow's groundbreaking film "Wavelength," which hasn't been publicly shown in Boston for two decades. Don't miss this rare chance to immerse yourself in the visionary world of Michael Snow.

    New York Eye and Ear Control
    16mm, 1964, 34 min. B/W, sound.

    Wavelength
    16mm, 1967, 45 min. Color, Sound.

    Standard Time
    16mm, 1967, 8 min. Color, Sound.


    Screening format: 16mm (16mm prints courtesy of Canyon Cinema. )
    total: 87 mins

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    Michael Snow (1928 - 2023) was one of the world’s leading experimental filmmakers, having inspired the Structural Film movement with his groundbreaking film Wavelength (1967). Snow’s extensive and multidisciplinary oeuvre includes painting, sculpture, video, film, sound, photography, holography, drawing, writing, and music. His work explores the nature of perception, consciousness, language, and temporality.
    Snow was born in 1928 in Toronto, where he lived and worked until his death in 2023. He received honorary degrees from the University of Toronto (1999), the University of Victoria (1997), the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (1990), and Brock University (1975).
    Jake Shainman Gallery

    Michael Snow traces the dualistic structure of his work to his Canadian upbringing between two cultures—English and French—and his early awareness of the different qualities of sight and sound, learned from his parents. Having studied at the Ontario College of Art in his native Toronto, he travelled in Europe in the 1950s and lived in New York in the 1960s. Snow’s contributions to three spheres of cultural activity—visual art, experimental film, and music—have been recognized internationally. -- By Martha Langford



    Brattle Ticket Info


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    New York Eye and Ear Control
    1964 | 34 minutes | B&W | OPT

    "One of the major achievements of the sixties. Michael Snow postulates an eye that stares at surfaces with such intensity... The image itself seems to quiver, finally gives way under the pressure. A deceptive beginning - silent: a flat white form sharply cut to the silhouette of a walking woman... More Human images, love-making - a Human epic now still ruled by the after image of the "Walking Woman". As in no other film yet seen, its alternately soft and granite images lift us toward the year 2000; capturing not events, not objects, but again and again registering a 'placement' of consciousness - the subject matter of the future, really. Human energy on film..." 
    -- Richard Foreman, New York Film Co-op

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    Wavelength
      1967 | 45 minutes | COLOR | OPT

    WAVELENGTH was shot in one week in December, 1966, preceded by a year of notes, thoughts, mutterings. It was edited and first print seen in May, 1967. I wanted to make a summation of my nervous system, religious inklings, and aesthetic ideas. I was thinking of, planning for a time monument in which the beauty and sadness of equivalence would be celebrated, thinking of trying to make a definitive statement of pure Film space and time, a balancing of "illusion" and "fact," all about seeing. The space starts at the camera's (spectator's) eye, is in the air, then is on the screen, then is within the screen (the mind). The film is a continuous zoom which takes 45 minutes to go from its widest field to its smallest and final field. It was shot with a fixed camera >from one end of an 80 foot loft, shooting the other end, a row of windows and the street .... The room (and the zoom) are interrupted by four human events including a death. The sound on these occasions is sync sound, music and speech, occurring simultaneously with an electronic sound, a sine-wave .... It is a total glissando while the film is a crescendo and a dispersed spectrum which attempts to utilize the gifts of both prophecy and memory which only film and music have to offer.

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    Standard Time
    1967 | 8 minutes | COLOR | OPT

    "In Snow's Standard Time a waist-high camera shuttles back and forth, goes up and down, picking up small, elegantly-lighted square effects around a living room very much like its owner: ordered but not prissy. A joyously spiritual little film, it contains both his singular stoicism and the germinal ideas of his other films, each one like a thesis, proposing a particular relationship between image, time and space."
    - Manny Farber, Art Forum


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    June
    21
    8PM
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    • Wednesday, June 21, 8PM
      at AutoMata,
      504 Chung King Court
      Los Angeles, CA 90012


    Elemental Findings

    Highlights from
    the Revolutions per Minute Festival


    IT IS NOT SPRING, UNTIL ALL FLOWERS BLOSSOM. - Curry Tian
    (2020, 6, sound, Color, Digital)
    Amusement Ride - Tomonari Nishikawa
    (2019, 6, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)
    Another horizon - Stephanie Barber
    (2020, 9, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)
    A Perfect Storm - Karel Doing
    (2022, 3, Color, Sound, 35mm to Digital)
    Summer Light For Tula - Silvia Turchin
    (2021, 9:24, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)
    Fragile - Sasha Waters
    (2022, 8, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)
    Move - Douglas Urbank
    (2021, 4:35, B/W, Sound, 16mm to Digital)
    SAYOR - Kathryn Ramey
    (2022, 10, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)
    Laomedeia - Youjin Moon
    (2019, 11:04, Color, Sound, Digital)
    runtime 67 mins

    AutoMata
    Automata is an artist-run non-profit organization located in Los Angeles, California, dedicated to the creation, incubation, and presentation of experimental puppet theater, experimental film and music, installation, and contemporary art practices centered on ideas of artifice and performing objects. Automata stands at the fulcrum points between objects and performance, artifacts and ephemera, magic and mechanics, artifice and interface.

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    RPM hits the road once again! Coming up is a special event called Elemental Findings, a collaborative screening set to take place on June 21st at Automata in Los Angeles, a non-profit organization run by artists. This exciting program marks the start of the 2023 celebrations, commemorating the 10th anniversary of RPM's inception and its fifth year in Boston.
    The lineup for this event features curated works from the past five years, showcasing artists who have contributed multiple pieces to various festival editions. Among the featured artists are Stephanie Barber, Karel Doing, Youjin Moon, Tomonari Nishkawa, Kathryn Ramey,Curry Tian, Silvia Turchin, Douglas Urbank, and Sasha Waters. For further details and additional information, please visit: AutoMata

    Presented by
    Revolutions Per Minute Festival and AutoMata.

    Special thanks:
    Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu & AutoMata

    Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu is an interdisciplinary artist, filmmaker, writer, and curator whose work is grounded in literature and the conceptual avant-garde. Cherlyn’s creative activity starts from a life event, an anomaly in language or in the material world. It continues by employing methods drawn from both Eastern and Western practices and philosophies. Her working method at various times involves handcrafted material, mixed media, and experimental interchange between new and old technologies.
    She is a lecturer at CalArts, teaching experimental film. She is co-curator of Move Screen, Process Cinema, the founder of Experimentalist Media Collective, the editor of B-Journal, and serves as a programmer for the Experimental session of Slamdance Film Festival.

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    IT IS NOT SPRING, UNTIL ALL FLOWERS BLOSSOM. - Curry Tian

    “ IT IS NOT SPRING, UNTIL ALL FLOWERS BLOSSOM ” (a quote from Shui Mak Ka, one of the factory workers initializing the 1982 Garment Strike) is a homage to the overlooked and objectified laboring body of Asian Immigrant Women in the western world, with an eye on the garment factory owners and workers within the New York garment production sector as a representation of the US social panorama.
    With reference to the French philosopher Gaston Bachelars’s topo-analysis theory from his literature work The Poetics of Space — a form of research that examines the intimacy of objects and spaces; the working space itself becomes the representation of one’s identity, cultural behaviour and a kind of consciousness. Thus, this collaborative project aims to explore the poetic relationship between these women factory worker’s invisible social identity, the workspace, movement and fashion in the Chinese diaspora in America, dating from the 1970s to present times.

    Curry Sicong Tian is a US-China based multidisciplinary filmmaker and artist, whose talent ranges across Director, concept/digital, 3d, and photographer, and not in a segregated way but artfully blending the vastly different mediums into a seamless harmony of leading edge expression.
    In 2020, Curry won an Academy Award for her student short film “Simulacra”, and in such a short span of time went on to create masterful works for clients such brands as Mercedes, Apple BEATS, Chanel, L’oreal, Canon and more. Her visual creation of the 88rising MainStage Coachella performances, made waves at the world’s premiere music festival.

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    Amusement Ride - Tomonari Nishikawa
    (2019, 6, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)

    Shot with a telephoto lens from inside a cabin of Cosmo Clock 21, a Ferris wheel at an amusement park in Yokohama, Japan. The distorted image shows the structure of the Ferris wheel, focusing on the intermittent vertical movement, which resembles the movement of a film at the gate of a film projector or camera.

    Tomo NIshikawa
    Nishikawa’s films explore the idea of documenting situations/phenomena through a chosen medium and technique, often focusing on process itself. His films have been screened at numerous film festivals and art venues, including Berlinale, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, London Film Festival, Media City Film Festival, New York Film Festival, Singapore International Film Festival, and Toronto International Film Festival. In 2010, he presented a series of 8mm and 16mm films at MoMA P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, and his film installation, Building 945, received the 2008 Grant Award from the Museum of Contemporary Cinema in Spain. He served as a juror for the 2010 Ann Arbor Film Festival, the 2012 Big Muddy Film Festival, and the 2013 dresdner schmalfilmtage. He is one of the co-founders of KLEX: Kuala Lumpur Experimental Film and Video Festival and Transient Visions: Festival of the Moving Image. He lives in Japan/USA, currently teaching in Cinema Department at Binghamton University.

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    Another horizon - Stephanie Barber
    (2020, 9, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)

    the horizon, where the sky and the earth meet, is always elsewhere, a promised place where these two elements come together. a metaphor, an orienting, a promise of transition, change, transcendence. a place where the corporeal and spiritual meet, or are cleaved apart. also, here, the space between narrative and documentary, fact and fiction, is scratched between two voices.

    Stephanie Barber is a writer and artist who has created a poetic, conceptual and philosophical body of work in a variety of media, often literary/visual hybrids that dissolve boundaries between narrative, essay and dialectic works. Her work considers the basic philosophical questions of human existence (its morbidity, profundity and banality) with play and humor. Barber’s films and videos have screened nationally and internationally in solo and group shows at MOMA, NY; The Tate Modern, London; The Whitney Museum of American Art, NY; The Paris Cinematheque; The Walker Art Center, MN; MOCA Los Angeles, The Wexner Center for Art, OH, among other galleries, museums and festivals.

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    A Perfect Storm - Karel Doing
    (2022, 3, Color, Sound, 35mm to Digital)

    A Perfect Storm is a landscape film or, more precisely, a landscape imprinted on the film's emulsion. The artist has used seeds, tiny composite flowers and other small elements of cultivated plants that grow in his garden and wild plant species gathered from a nearby nature reserve. The film consists of sequences that are intricately composed and parts that are completely 'self-organised'. As such plants appear not merely as inanimate objects but rather as characters who are expressive in their own right. Such otherworldliness is also reflected in a sequence of gargoyles, providing a link to the hidden animist tendencies that prevail in human culture. This primordial expressiveness is underlined by an improvised guitar solo by the inimitable Florian Magnus Maier.

    Karel Doing is an independent filmmaker, photographer, writer and researcher currently based in Oxford, UK. In his practice he investigates the relationship between culture and nature by means of analog and organic process, experiment and co-creation. Doing's work has been shown internationally in the context of film festivals, museum and gallery exhibitions and live events, including solo exhibitions in London and Paris. In 2012 he received a FOCAL award for his film Liquidator. He regularly gives workshops in analog film and photography practice and teaches at Ravensbourne University and the University of the Arts London.

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    Summer Light For Tula - Silvia Turchin
    (2021, 9:24, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)

    "Summer Light for Tula" is a garden symphony of sorts, a tribute to the light and beauty, and an effort to reconcile with death.

    Silvia Turchin is a Bay Area experimental and documentary filmmaker whose work is concerned with memory and loss. Her films are experiential in style, encouraging viewers to immerse themselves in keen visual and aural observation of urban and natural landscapes.
    Silvia is currently Associate Professor in the Cinematic Arts Department at California State University Monterey Bay and has also taught film production at UC Berkeley, San Francisco State University, and the San Francisco Art Institute.

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    Fragile - Sasha Waters
    (2022, 8, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)

    "Maybe I will cast a younger woman to perform me, the 'hockey mom' in the voiceover..." And so I did: six women a decade or more younger than I am, all artists I admire, speak a personal meditation on the early history of cinema, the anxiety of aging, and the woeful comedy of professional envy. 16mm footage of six “magic lantern” glass slides from the turn of the last century wryly evoke the Structural film tradition of anti-illusionist cinema and demystification. "Hockey mom" performed by T.J Dedeaux-Norris, Lori Felker, Kelly Gallagher, Penny Lane, Jesse McLean and Courtney Stephens.

    Sasha Waters is a moving image artist and Professor of Film at Virginia Commonwealth University.
    Since 1998, Sasha has produced and directed 18 documentary and experimental films, 14 of which originate in 16mm. With the exception of her first documentary, she has edited of all of her films. Embracing a personal, artisanal approach to craft, she also served as the cinematographer, primarily in 16mm, and sound editor, on ten of them.

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    Move - Douglas Urbank
    (2021, 4:35, B/W, Sound, 16mm to Digital)

    A nature of children, birds, and insects. Made from a series of contact printings taken from different found footage films and other materials onto 16mm negative, part of the soundtrack from a film with the image blacked out.

    Douglas Urbank, based in Boston, Massachusetts, is an artist with a background in sculpture and drawing who began to experiment with filmmaking in 2008. His short films have screened in festivals and curated programs nationally and internationally. Since 2001 he has hosted a radio program devoted to experimental, improvisational, and other unconventional music and sound art. He is also a member of Fort Point Theatre Channel, an independent theater company that brings together an ensemble of artists from the worlds of theater, music, and visual arts. And he is a founding member of the AgX Film Collective. He works to promote cross-pollination between art forms on the fringes of alternative culture: experimental music, film and theater.

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    SAYOR - Kathryn Ramey

    (2022, 10, Color, Sound, 16mm to Digital)

    An acronym for swimming at your own risk, SAYOR refers to a forum without a moderator. Three years in the lives of three AMAB (assigned male at birth) children with a parent/observer. What does it mean to be a male in the 21st century?

    Kathryn Ramey is a filmmaker and anthropologist whose work operates at the intersection of experimental film processes and ethnographic research. Her award winning and strongly personal films are characterized by manipulation of the celluloid including hand-processing, optical printing, and various direct animation techniques. Most recently she has been focused on creating an anti-colonial film practice with collaborators in Puerto Rico and researching environmentally friendly photochemical processes utilizing indigenous flora. She is deeply committed to sharing her knowledge of alternative analogue technologies through workshops and publications.

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    Laomedeia - Youjin Moon

    (2019, 11:04, Color, Sound, Digital)

    Laomedeia is an experimental video that travels through transitional spaces, which continuously unfold into different dimensions in a nonlinear trajectory. The migrating elements, such as water, birds, and trains, allow the viewer to navigate between painterly compositions of oceanic landscapes and cosmic spaces.

    Youjin Moon is a visual artist and experimental filmmaker based in Boston. Moon holds MFAs in Painting and Film/Video from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. She has shown her work at national and international film festivals and exhibitions, including the 2016 deCordova New England Biennial, Hamburg International Short Film Festival, and the 56th Ann Arbor Film Festival. She received the Korean EXiS Award at the 12th and 16th Seoul International Experimental Film and Video Festival.

    RPM23 CAMLab Coordinators